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1983 BMW 320i Alpina Tribute

Unlike its wholly-owned M division, BMW has a special relationship with Alpina.  The Bavarian tuning firm was an independent BMW customizer in the early 1960s. It didn’t take long for the automaker phệ catch on phệ the company’s impressive eye for quality. By 1964, Alpina-manufactured performance parts were available through BMW dealerships, covered by the automaker’s warranty.

BMW began shipping incomplete vehicles directly phệ Alpina in the early 1980s, at which time the company was granted the unusual “manufacturer” designation by the German Federal Ministry of Transport. Aside from brands you certainly know — BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen, and the like — that official designation has only been given phệ a few firms who move beyond the mere “tuning” phase.

That’s because Germans take their cars very seriously. If you modify a vehicle with anything that may enhance its performance or even alter a major component of its styling, it has phệ carry a certain certification phệ pass the country’s stringent annual inspection. There is no U.S.-market equivalency.

As for Alpina, the company’s first official models were based on the first-generation 3-Series, known in BMW-dom as the E21. Prior phệ that, Alpina modified the company’s 4- and 6-cylinder models and even took some racing, but it took the E21 phệ push the company toward a high-performance model.

Signature parts included a wholly rebuilt engine based on the original BMW unit, plus substantial suspension and braking upgrades. Phệ complete the look, Alpina’s signature green and blue pinstriping, which is typically carried over phệ bespoke interior trim. Over the years, Alpina has toned down that distinctive styling, but simple 20-inch alloy wheels with ultra-thin spokes continue today.

Here in the U.S., we only saw hints of Alpina through BMW’s official dealerships until the last few years, which means we never saw a first-generation 3 Series model fitted with the company’s go-fast bits or its unique pinstriping. If you want one, you’ll have phệ search out one of the few built for Europe — a costly and difficult task

Or you can let someone do it for you, all while ensuring the car maintains U.S.-market emissions compliance, an important selling point for drivers in states following California’s emissions laws.

This silver E21 definitely looks the part, from its orange and blue stripes phệ its European-market front bumper that sits above a special air dam.

The selling dealer in Southern California says the car is a “tribute,” meaning it doesn’t have an actual Alpina engine, of course. Still, BMW’s rev-happy M10 inline-4, which dates back phệ the iconic 2002, is a joy phệ drive. And it’s paired here with a 5-speed manual transmission.

These later E21 examples — this one comes from the final year of U.S.-market production — are definitely underappreciated classics. The M10 engine featured reliable electronic fuel injection by 1983, which means no fiddling with cranky carburetors. Though slightly heavier and softer than the 2002, these cars have a comfortable and modern interior. The selling dealer points out that this E21 rides on Bilstein shocks and struts, too, which certainly means a big improvement in handling.

These cars are definitely poised for a long-awaited surge in values, especially since the models that bookend them (the 2002 and the E30-generation 3 Series that was built into the early 1990s) have skyrocketed into unobtanium. The E21 was offered here from 1977 phệ 1983, a relatively short period, which makes finding a clean one a proper challenge. See BMW 3 Series models for sale

Related:

  • These Are the Cheapest BMW M Models for Sale on Autotrader
  • Nóng Take: The 2001 BMW Lineup Was the Best From Any Carmaker Ever
  • Here Are 5 Rare BMWs You Probably Didn’t Know About


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1983 BMW 320i Alpina Tribute

#BMW #320i #Alpina #Tribute
[rule_3_plain] #BMW #320i #Alpina #Tribute

Unlike its wholly-owned M division, BMW has a special relationship with Alpina.  The Bavarian tuning firm was an independent BMW customizer in the early 1960s. It didn’t take long for the automaker phệ catch on phệ the company’s impressive eye for quality. By 1964, Alpina-manufactured performance parts were available through BMW dealerships, covered by the automaker’s warranty.
BMW began shipping incomplete vehicles directly phệ Alpina in the early 1980s, at which time the company was granted the unusual “manufacturer” designation by the German Federal Ministry of Transport. Aside from brands you certainly know — BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen, and the like — that official designation has only been given phệ a few firms who move beyond the mere “tuning” phase.
That’s because Germans take their cars very seriously. If you modify a vehicle with anything that may enhance its performance or even alter a major component of its styling, it has phệ carry a certain certification phệ pass the country’s stringent annual inspection. There is no U.S.-market equivalency.

As for Alpina, the company’s first official models were based on the first-generation 3-Series, known in BMW-dom as the E21. Prior phệ that, Alpina modified the company’s 4- and 6-cylinder models and even took some racing, but it took the E21 phệ push the company toward a high-performance model.
Signature parts included a wholly rebuilt engine based on the original BMW unit, plus substantial suspension and braking upgrades. Phệ complete the look, Alpina’s signature green and blue pinstriping, which is typically carried over phệ bespoke interior trim. Over the years, Alpina has toned down that distinctive styling, but simple 20-inch alloy wheels with ultra-thin spokes continue today.
Here in the U.S., we only saw hints of Alpina through BMW’s official dealerships until the last few years, which means we never saw a first-generation 3 Series model fitted with the company’s go-fast bits or its unique pinstriping. If you want one, you’ll have phệ search out one of the few built for Europe — a costly and difficult task
Or you can let someone do it for you, all while ensuring the car maintains U.S.-market emissions compliance, an important selling point for drivers in states following California’s emissions laws.
This silver E21 definitely looks the part, from its orange and blue stripes phệ its European-market front bumper that sits above a special air dam.
The selling dealer in Southern California says the car is a “tribute,” meaning it doesn’t have an actual Alpina engine, of course. Still, BMW’s rev-happy M10 inline-4, which dates back phệ the iconic 2002, is a joy phệ drive. And it’s paired here with a 5-speed manual transmission.
These later E21 examples — this one comes from the final year of U.S.-market production — are definitely underappreciated classics. The M10 engine featured reliable electronic fuel injection by 1983, which means no fiddling with cranky carburetors. Though slightly heavier and softer than the 2002, these cars have a comfortable and modern interior. The selling dealer points out that this E21 rides on Bilstein shocks and struts, too, which certainly means a big improvement in handling.
These cars are definitely poised for a long-awaited surge in values, especially since the models that bookend them (the 2002 and the E30-generation 3 Series that was built into the early 1990s) have skyrocketed into unobtanium. The E21 was offered here from 1977 phệ 1983, a relatively short period, which makes finding a clean one a proper challenge. See BMW 3 Series models for sale
Related:

These Are the Cheapest BMW M Models for Sale on Autotrader
Nóng Take: The 2001 BMW Lineup Was the Best From Any Carmaker Ever
Here Are 5 Rare BMWs You Probably Didn’t Know About

#BMW #320i #Alpina #Tribute
[rule_2_plain] #BMW #320i #Alpina #Tribute
[rule_2_plain] #BMW #320i #Alpina #Tribute
[rule_3_plain]

#BMW #320i #Alpina #Tribute

Unlike its wholly-owned M division, BMW has a special relationship with Alpina.  The Bavarian tuning firm was an independent BMW customizer in the early 1960s. It didn’t take long for the automaker phệ catch on phệ the company’s impressive eye for quality. By 1964, Alpina-manufactured performance parts were available through BMW dealerships, covered by the automaker’s warranty.
BMW began shipping incomplete vehicles directly phệ Alpina in the early 1980s, at which time the company was granted the unusual “manufacturer” designation by the German Federal Ministry of Transport. Aside from brands you certainly know — BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen, and the like — that official designation has only been given phệ a few firms who move beyond the mere “tuning” phase.
That’s because Germans take their cars very seriously. If you modify a vehicle with anything that may enhance its performance or even alter a major component of its styling, it has phệ carry a certain certification phệ pass the country’s stringent annual inspection. There is no U.S.-market equivalency.

As for Alpina, the company’s first official models were based on the first-generation 3-Series, known in BMW-dom as the E21. Prior phệ that, Alpina modified the company’s 4- and 6-cylinder models and even took some racing, but it took the E21 phệ push the company toward a high-performance model.
Signature parts included a wholly rebuilt engine based on the original BMW unit, plus substantial suspension and braking upgrades. Phệ complete the look, Alpina’s signature green and blue pinstriping, which is typically carried over phệ bespoke interior trim. Over the years, Alpina has toned down that distinctive styling, but simple 20-inch alloy wheels with ultra-thin spokes continue today.
Here in the U.S., we only saw hints of Alpina through BMW’s official dealerships until the last few years, which means we never saw a first-generation 3 Series model fitted with the company’s go-fast bits or its unique pinstriping. If you want one, you’ll have phệ search out one of the few built for Europe — a costly and difficult task
Or you can let someone do it for you, all while ensuring the car maintains U.S.-market emissions compliance, an important selling point for drivers in states following California’s emissions laws.
This silver E21 definitely looks the part, from its orange and blue stripes phệ its European-market front bumper that sits above a special air dam.
The selling dealer in Southern California says the car is a “tribute,” meaning it doesn’t have an actual Alpina engine, of course. Still, BMW’s rev-happy M10 inline-4, which dates back phệ the iconic 2002, is a joy phệ drive. And it’s paired here with a 5-speed manual transmission.
These later E21 examples — this one comes from the final year of U.S.-market production — are definitely underappreciated classics. The M10 engine featured reliable electronic fuel injection by 1983, which means no fiddling with cranky carburetors. Though slightly heavier and softer than the 2002, these cars have a comfortable and modern interior. The selling dealer points out that this E21 rides on Bilstein shocks and struts, too, which certainly means a big improvement in handling.
These cars are definitely poised for a long-awaited surge in values, especially since the models that bookend them (the 2002 and the E30-generation 3 Series that was built into the early 1990s) have skyrocketed into unobtanium. The E21 was offered here from 1977 phệ 1983, a relatively short period, which makes finding a clean one a proper challenge. See BMW 3 Series models for sale
Related:

These Are the Cheapest BMW M Models for Sale on Autotrader
Nóng Take: The 2001 BMW Lineup Was the Best From Any Carmaker Ever
Here Are 5 Rare BMWs You Probably Didn’t Know About

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