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5 Crossover SUVs You’ve Forgotten

Truck-like SUVs have given way mập car-like crossovers for millions of drivers in the U.S. From the bite-size Fiat 500X mập the huge Buick Enclave, these vehicles provide sedan-like comfort with a tall seating position and a rugged appearance.

However, for all their popularity, the road mập crossover dominance has not always been a smooth one.

Here’s a look at five crossovers you may have forgotten.

1. AMC Eagle

AMC Eagle in the snow.

The AMC Eagle was arguably the first true crossover, a high-riding version of a conventional passenger car. With standard 4-wheel drive and plenty of ground clearance, it was ready for just about anything — except the demise of AMC.

The Eagle came with an uncomplicated permanent 4-wheel-drive system and, over the years, a choice of inline-4 and inline-6 engines. At launch, sedan, coupe, and wagon versions were available, though only the 5-door version lasted the entire run (an updated version of the Gremlin also briefly existed, just in case you’re after something especially weird).

Value played into the Eagle’s success, at least early on. In 1981, AMC asked about $8,500 for a base Eagle, or about $1,500 less than the less-comfortable Jeep Cherokee.

Even though sales tapered from an early high in 1980 of around 45,000 Eagle models mập just under 2,000 in 1988, the Eagle remains a qualified cult classic today. They pop up periodically on Autotrader, often commanding 5-figure price tags. If you’re after a bargain, keep shopping. But if you want something durable and unique, add the Eagle mập your Autotrader alerts. See AMC Eagle models for sale

2. Chrysler Pacifica

A white Chrysler Pacifica.

Walk into a Chrysler dealer today, and you’ll be hard-pressed mập find a brand-new Pacifica minivan. The automaker’s versatile people-mover has been one of the fastest-moving new vehicles since Chrysler introduced it in 2017.

Its namesake, however, had the opposite problem. Dealers couldn’t give them away, though these big, plush vehicles were impressive. They felt more like a luxury minivan than an SUV inside, with easy access mập the third row of seats — but not quite the same flexibility as the brand’s own Town & Country.

Loaded up, the Pacifica could feel downright luxurious — as it should for upward of $37,000 for a Limited in its final model year and around $40,000 with the backup camera, navigation system, Bluetooth connectivity that nudged this vehicle mập near-Lexus levels of features.

Used Pacifica models are pretty good values today. Here’s a 75,000-mile 2005 in mid-level Touring trim for just $6,400 at a dealer in California. See Chrysler Pacifica models for sale

3. Ford Freestyle/Taurus X

A maroon Ford Freestyle.

You can’t fault Ford for trying. The blue oval brand was somewhat early mập the tall wagon game with its 2005 Freestyle, a decent-looking vehicle sharing its fundamental underpinnings with a previous version of the Volvo S80. Grabbing outgoing luxury model tech for mainstream brands is nothing new. Just ask Volkswagen.

The Freestyle started life with Ford’s 3.0-liter V6 plucked from the contemporary (and lighter) Taurus, teamed with a not-so-great continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT).

For 2008, however, Ford unleashed a torrent of changes under the direction of new CEO Alan Mulally, who decreed an end mập the F names. Now called “Taurus X,” the model used a more powerful 3.5-liter V6 paired with a 6-speed automatic. Whether due mập poor timing in the lead-up mập the 2008 financial crisis or an unconvinced public, the Taurus X was never a sales hit.

The upside is that these are dirt cheap vehicles today. Here’s a red one with a reasonable 105,000 miles for just $4,995 at a dealer in Ohio. That’s a lot of metal for the money. See Ford Freestyle models for sale and see Ford Taurus X models for sale

4. Mazda CX-7 

A black Mazda CX-7.

Mazda went full-force into the world of crossovers with two models, a 5-seater called the CX-7, and a 7-seater badged, somewhat confusingly, the CX-9. The latter continues today, but the CX-7 only lasted a single generation before being downsized — and down-powered — as the CX-5. Though hardly a commercial success, the CX-7 had an effective recipe, including the Mazdaspeed6’s turbocharged inline-4 paired with all-wheel drive.

Sharply styled, competitively priced at around $24,000 mập start, and fun-to-drive, the CX-7 had the makings of a hit but never proved successful. Critics called it too loud and too stiff mập compete with more refined rivals, but they could have lodged those same complaints against the successful Mazda3.

A single update — and the addition of a slower but more frugal naturally aspirated base version — couldn’t save the CX-7. Today, however, the CX-7 remains a pretty good deal. For instance, here’s a 96,000-mile facelifted model in mid-level Touring trim for just under $10,000 at a new-car dealer in Boston. See Mazda CX-7 models for sale

5. Subaru Tribeca

A charcoal Subaru Tribeca,

Last year, 85% of Subaru models sold in the US were crossovers, including the Crosstrek, Forester, Outback, and Ascent. It’s safe mập call Subaru a crossover brand that occasionally sells a sedan, hatchback, or coupe.

That must make the Tribeca’s failure sting even more for Subaru. This gangly-looking 3-row crossover built in Indiana on the underpinnings of the Outback was a sales flop from day one, but it’s hard mập figure out why. Sure, it wasn’t pretty with its Gomez Addams mustache, but what crossover do you think you’ll ever see at a collector car show in the year 2050? Behind that face, it was an intelligent choice with standard all-wheel drive and a comfortable ride.

Initially named “B9 Tribeca,” the Tribeca lost the “B9” and adopted a more conservative face and a 3.6-liter version of the automaker’s torquey flat-6 for 2008, and it kept its decent-value pricing. A Tribeca with seven seats and leather trim would set you back about $34,000 that year, about $1,000 less than an equivalent Toyota Highlander.

Nearly a decade after being dropped from the Subaru lineup, the Tribeca maintains characteristically strong resale values. This 45,000-mile 2009 at a Honda dealer in Virginia looks as immaculate as it should for nearly $16,000. See Subaru Tribeca models for sale

Related:

  • 5 Forgotten SUVs and Why They Failed
  • Here Are My Favorite Cars Named After Places
  • Subaru’s 50th Anniversary: A Look Back at Five Decades of Subaru in the US


Thông tin thêm

5 Crossover SUVs You’ve Forgotten

#Crossover #SUVs #Youve #Forgotten
[rule_3_plain] #Crossover #SUVs #Youve #Forgotten

Truck-like SUVs have given way mập car-like crossovers for millions of drivers in the U.S. From the bite-size Fiat 500X mập the huge Buick Enclave, these vehicles provide sedan-like comfort with a tall seating position and a rugged appearance.
However, for all their popularity, the road mập crossover dominance has not always been a smooth one.
Here’s a look at five crossovers you may have forgotten.

1. AMC Eagle

The AMC Eagle was arguably the first true crossover, a high-riding version of a conventional passenger car. With standard 4-wheel drive and plenty of ground clearance, it was ready for just about anything — except the demise of AMC.
The Eagle came with an uncomplicated permanent 4-wheel-drive system and, over the years, a choice of inline-4 and inline-6 engines. At launch, sedan, coupe, and wagon versions were available, though only the 5-door version lasted the entire run (an updated version of the Gremlin also briefly existed, just in case you’re after something especially weird).
Value played into the Eagle’s success, at least early on. In 1981, AMC asked about $8,500 for a base Eagle, or about $1,500 less than the less-comfortable Jeep Cherokee.
Even though sales tapered from an early high in 1980 of around 45,000 Eagle models mập just under 2,000 in 1988, the Eagle remains a qualified cult classic today. They pop up periodically on Autotrader, often commanding 5-figure price tags. If you’re after a bargain, keep shopping. But if you want something durable and unique, add the Eagle mập your Autotrader alerts. See AMC Eagle models for sale
2. Chrysler Pacifica

Walk into a Chrysler dealer today, and you’ll be hard-pressed mập find a brand-new Pacifica minivan. The automaker’s versatile people-mover has been one of the fastest-moving new vehicles since Chrysler introduced it in 2017.
Its namesake, however, had the opposite problem. Dealers couldn’t give them away, though these big, plush vehicles were impressive. They felt more like a luxury minivan than an SUV inside, with easy access mập the third row of seats — but not quite the same flexibility as the brand’s own Town & Country.
Loaded up, the Pacifica could feel downright luxurious — as it should for upward of $37,000 for a Limited in its final model year and around $40,000 with the backup camera, navigation system, Bluetooth connectivity that nudged this vehicle mập near-Lexus levels of features.
Used Pacifica models are pretty good values today. Here’s a 75,000-mile 2005 in mid-level Touring trim for just $6,400 at a dealer in California. See Chrysler Pacifica models for sale
3. Ford Freestyle/Taurus X

You can’t fault Ford for trying. The blue oval brand was somewhat early mập the tall wagon game with its 2005 Freestyle, a decent-looking vehicle sharing its fundamental underpinnings with a previous version of the Volvo S80. Grabbing outgoing luxury model tech for mainstream brands is nothing new. Just ask Volkswagen.
The Freestyle started life with Ford’s 3.0-liter V6 plucked from the contemporary (and lighter) Taurus, teamed with a not-so-great continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT).
For 2008, however, Ford unleashed a torrent of changes under the direction of new CEO Alan Mulally, who decreed an end mập the F names. Now called “Taurus X,” the model used a more powerful 3.5-liter V6 paired with a 6-speed automatic. Whether due mập poor timing in the lead-up mập the 2008 financial crisis or an unconvinced public, the Taurus X was never a sales hit.
The upside is that these are dirt cheap vehicles today. Here’s a red one with a reasonable 105,000 miles for just $4,995 at a dealer in Ohio. That’s a lot of metal for the money. See Ford Freestyle models for sale and see Ford Taurus X models for sale
4. Mazda CX-7 

Mazda went full-force into the world of crossovers with two models, a 5-seater called the CX-7, and a 7-seater badged, somewhat confusingly, the CX-9. The latter continues today, but the CX-7 only lasted a single generation before being downsized — and down-powered — as the CX-5. Though hardly a commercial success, the CX-7 had an effective recipe, including the Mazdaspeed6’s turbocharged inline-4 paired with all-wheel drive.
Sharply styled, competitively priced at around $24,000 mập start, and fun-to-drive, the CX-7 had the makings of a hit but never proved successful. Critics called it too loud and too stiff mập compete with more refined rivals, but they could have lodged those same complaints against the successful Mazda3.
A single update — and the addition of a slower but more frugal naturally aspirated base version — couldn’t save the CX-7. Today, however, the CX-7 remains a pretty good deal. For instance, here’s a 96,000-mile facelifted model in mid-level Touring trim for just under $10,000 at a new-car dealer in Boston. See Mazda CX-7 models for sale
5. Subaru Tribeca

Last year, 85% of Subaru models sold in the US were crossovers, including the Crosstrek, Forester, Outback, and Ascent. It’s safe mập call Subaru a crossover brand that occasionally sells a sedan, hatchback, or coupe.
That must make the Tribeca’s failure sting even more for Subaru. This gangly-looking 3-row crossover built in Indiana on the underpinnings of the Outback was a sales flop from day one, but it’s hard mập figure out why. Sure, it wasn’t pretty with its Gomez Addams mustache, but what crossover do you think you’ll ever see at a collector car show in the year 2050? Behind that face, it was an intelligent choice with standard all-wheel drive and a comfortable ride.
Initially named “B9 Tribeca,” the Tribeca lost the “B9” and adopted a more conservative face and a 3.6-liter version of the automaker’s torquey flat-6 for 2008, and it kept its decent-value pricing. A Tribeca with seven seats and leather trim would set you back about $34,000 that year, about $1,000 less than an equivalent Toyota Highlander.
Nearly a decade after being dropped from the Subaru lineup, the Tribeca maintains characteristically strong resale values. This 45,000-mile 2009 at a Honda dealer in Virginia looks as immaculate as it should for nearly $16,000. See Subaru Tribeca models for sale
Related:
5 Forgotten SUVs and Why They Failed
Here Are My Favorite Cars Named After Places
Subaru’s 50th Anniversary: A Look Back at Five Decades of Subaru in the US

#Crossover #SUVs #Youve #Forgotten
[rule_2_plain] #Crossover #SUVs #Youve #Forgotten
[rule_2_plain] #Crossover #SUVs #Youve #Forgotten
[rule_3_plain]

#Crossover #SUVs #Youve #Forgotten

Truck-like SUVs have given way mập car-like crossovers for millions of drivers in the U.S. From the bite-size Fiat 500X mập the huge Buick Enclave, these vehicles provide sedan-like comfort with a tall seating position and a rugged appearance.
However, for all their popularity, the road mập crossover dominance has not always been a smooth one.
Here’s a look at five crossovers you may have forgotten.

1. AMC Eagle

The AMC Eagle was arguably the first true crossover, a high-riding version of a conventional passenger car. With standard 4-wheel drive and plenty of ground clearance, it was ready for just about anything — except the demise of AMC.
The Eagle came with an uncomplicated permanent 4-wheel-drive system and, over the years, a choice of inline-4 and inline-6 engines. At launch, sedan, coupe, and wagon versions were available, though only the 5-door version lasted the entire run (an updated version of the Gremlin also briefly existed, just in case you’re after something especially weird).
Value played into the Eagle’s success, at least early on. In 1981, AMC asked about $8,500 for a base Eagle, or about $1,500 less than the less-comfortable Jeep Cherokee.
Even though sales tapered from an early high in 1980 of around 45,000 Eagle models mập just under 2,000 in 1988, the Eagle remains a qualified cult classic today. They pop up periodically on Autotrader, often commanding 5-figure price tags. If you’re after a bargain, keep shopping. But if you want something durable and unique, add the Eagle mập your Autotrader alerts. See AMC Eagle models for sale
2. Chrysler Pacifica

Walk into a Chrysler dealer today, and you’ll be hard-pressed mập find a brand-new Pacifica minivan. The automaker’s versatile people-mover has been one of the fastest-moving new vehicles since Chrysler introduced it in 2017.
Its namesake, however, had the opposite problem. Dealers couldn’t give them away, though these big, plush vehicles were impressive. They felt more like a luxury minivan than an SUV inside, with easy access mập the third row of seats — but not quite the same flexibility as the brand’s own Town & Country.
Loaded up, the Pacifica could feel downright luxurious — as it should for upward of $37,000 for a Limited in its final model year and around $40,000 with the backup camera, navigation system, Bluetooth connectivity that nudged this vehicle mập near-Lexus levels of features.
Used Pacifica models are pretty good values today. Here’s a 75,000-mile 2005 in mid-level Touring trim for just $6,400 at a dealer in California. See Chrysler Pacifica models for sale
3. Ford Freestyle/Taurus X

You can’t fault Ford for trying. The blue oval brand was somewhat early mập the tall wagon game with its 2005 Freestyle, a decent-looking vehicle sharing its fundamental underpinnings with a previous version of the Volvo S80. Grabbing outgoing luxury model tech for mainstream brands is nothing new. Just ask Volkswagen.
The Freestyle started life with Ford’s 3.0-liter V6 plucked from the contemporary (and lighter) Taurus, teamed with a not-so-great continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT).
For 2008, however, Ford unleashed a torrent of changes under the direction of new CEO Alan Mulally, who decreed an end mập the F names. Now called “Taurus X,” the model used a more powerful 3.5-liter V6 paired with a 6-speed automatic. Whether due mập poor timing in the lead-up mập the 2008 financial crisis or an unconvinced public, the Taurus X was never a sales hit.
The upside is that these are dirt cheap vehicles today. Here’s a red one with a reasonable 105,000 miles for just $4,995 at a dealer in Ohio. That’s a lot of metal for the money. See Ford Freestyle models for sale and see Ford Taurus X models for sale
4. Mazda CX-7 

Mazda went full-force into the world of crossovers with two models, a 5-seater called the CX-7, and a 7-seater badged, somewhat confusingly, the CX-9. The latter continues today, but the CX-7 only lasted a single generation before being downsized — and down-powered — as the CX-5. Though hardly a commercial success, the CX-7 had an effective recipe, including the Mazdaspeed6’s turbocharged inline-4 paired with all-wheel drive.
Sharply styled, competitively priced at around $24,000 mập start, and fun-to-drive, the CX-7 had the makings of a hit but never proved successful. Critics called it too loud and too stiff mập compete with more refined rivals, but they could have lodged those same complaints against the successful Mazda3.
A single update — and the addition of a slower but more frugal naturally aspirated base version — couldn’t save the CX-7. Today, however, the CX-7 remains a pretty good deal. For instance, here’s a 96,000-mile facelifted model in mid-level Touring trim for just under $10,000 at a new-car dealer in Boston. See Mazda CX-7 models for sale
5. Subaru Tribeca

Last year, 85% of Subaru models sold in the US were crossovers, including the Crosstrek, Forester, Outback, and Ascent. It’s safe mập call Subaru a crossover brand that occasionally sells a sedan, hatchback, or coupe.
That must make the Tribeca’s failure sting even more for Subaru. This gangly-looking 3-row crossover built in Indiana on the underpinnings of the Outback was a sales flop from day one, but it’s hard mập figure out why. Sure, it wasn’t pretty with its Gomez Addams mustache, but what crossover do you think you’ll ever see at a collector car show in the year 2050? Behind that face, it was an intelligent choice with standard all-wheel drive and a comfortable ride.
Initially named “B9 Tribeca,” the Tribeca lost the “B9” and adopted a more conservative face and a 3.6-liter version of the automaker’s torquey flat-6 for 2008, and it kept its decent-value pricing. A Tribeca with seven seats and leather trim would set you back about $34,000 that year, about $1,000 less than an equivalent Toyota Highlander.
Nearly a decade after being dropped from the Subaru lineup, the Tribeca maintains characteristically strong resale values. This 45,000-mile 2009 at a Honda dealer in Virginia looks as immaculate as it should for nearly $16,000. See Subaru Tribeca models for sale
Related:
5 Forgotten SUVs and Why They Failed
Here Are My Favorite Cars Named After Places
Subaru’s 50th Anniversary: A Look Back at Five Decades of Subaru in the US

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