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5 Minivans You’ve Probably Forgotten

When we talk about minivans, we tend phệ think of big names (and big vehicles), but variously family-friendly people haulers have been tossed onto the market by a wide range of automakers.

Most of these arrived and then disappeared, barely registering a blip on shoppers’ radar. Here’s a look at five vans you may not have realized existed in the first place.

1. 2006 – 2010 Kia Rondo

2006-2010 Kia Rondo
Here’s a Kia Rondo for under $7,000 at a dealer in the Phoenix area.

Kia was coming into its own in the mid-2000s when the automaker began expanding its lineup. No longer content with simply building cheap cars, Kia began pushing itself into different markets. One of the oddest was the mini-minivan segment, a popular body style in Europe that never caught on in the U.S. Looking more like a wagon or hatchback with an exceptionally high roofline, the Rondo cast an unusual shadow.

The model arrived here in 2006 and lasted through 2010. One thing it had in its favor was a low price: just $16,995 for the base 4-cylinder version in 2007. While not exactly lavish, it had six airbags, anti-lock brakes, alloy wheels, and a CD player. Families on a budget could add air conditioning and a small third-row seat for just $2,000 more. That money bought it on par with a base Dodge Caravan, which had crank windows and no side airbags.

The Rondo is still plenty cheap. Here’s an 81,000-mile high-option version for under $7,000 at a dealer in the Phoenix area. See Kia Rondo models for sale

2. 1988 – 1998 Mazda MPV

1998 Mazda MPV
Here’s a Mazda MPV dressed up in All-Sport trim with 4-wheel drive at a dealer near Portland, Oregon.

Mazda offered two models with the MPV, and they couldn’t have been more different. Mazda claimed the meant “Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicle,” which clearly means it should have been called the MPPV. The first version bowed in 1988. It was a precursor phệ the rounded-off SUV models soon dominating American driveways, yet it had only three passenger doors and cartoonish proportions. The original MPV came standard with rear-wheel drive and offered an off-road-ready part-time 4-wheel-drive option (albeit without low range). In contrast phệ more street-oriented vans with all-wheel drive, such as the Toyota Previa and Dodge Grand Caravan, the MPV wound up being marketed as an SUV alternative.

Initial demand was nóng but quickly tapered off. A revamp for 1996 brought more conventional SUV-like styling plus an additional front-hinged passenger door. At the time, it was the only SUV-ish thing in Mazda’s portfolio, but that wasn’t enough phệ save it. Mazda dropped the model after 1998.

These vans were rare sights when new, and they’re less common today. Still, here’s a final-year example dressed up in All-Sport trim with 4-wheel drive at a dealer near Portland, Oregon. It looks exceptionally well-preserved, even with over 165,000 miles showing. See Mazda MPV models for sale

3. 1991 – 1995 Mitsubishi Expo LRV/Eagle Summit/Dodge Colt Wagon/Plymouth Colt Vista

1995 Mitsubishi Expo LRV
This short lived model was only offered between 1991 and a truncated 1995 model year.

Take your pick. This lineup of Mitsubishi-designed mini people carriers wore many badges (none as great as Space Wagon in Japan). These were small vehicles with front- or all-wheel drive options, automatic or manual gearboxes, and a choice between 3-door short-wheelbase and 4-door long-wheelbase versions. However, this dizzying lineup of vans wasn’t enough phệ sway buyers, as it was only offered between 1991 and a truncated 1995 model year.

Still, these vans were neat high-roof models with seating for up phệ seven passengers in a long-wheelbase configuration. Those models stretched just 197.7 inches long, so they weren’t a good choice for hauling a basketball team phệ practice. At the end of their run, an all-wheel-drive Expo long-wheelbase model with everything Mitsubishi could throw at it (which wasn’t much, let’s be honest) was around $20,000. If you showed up phệ a Toyota dealer with that much cash in 1995, they’d show you the used-car lot. See Mitsubishi Expo models for sale or See Eagle Summit models for sale or See Dodge Colt models for sale or See Plymouth Colt models for sale

4. 1996 – 1998 Nissan Stanza Wagon

1998 Nissan Stanza Wagon
You’ll definitely want phệ set an Autotrader search alert if you want phệ pounce on a Stanza.

The Nissan Stanza Wagon was decidedly ahead of its time when it arrived in the early 1980s. Inspired by a Giorgetto Giugiaro design, its angular lines surrounded an innovative interior accessed by dual sliding doors more than a decade before Chrysler would do such a thing. There was no B-pillar, which meant that a Stanza Wagon with its doors opened looked like the automotive equivalent of a dog-run or breezeway. Available inward-facing third-row jump seats offered additional utility, and buyers could have the Stanza Wagon with 4-wheel drive.

That’s a lot phệ take in — and it was too much for consumers since Nissan dropped the model after a 3-year run in 1988. You’ll definitely want phệ set an Autotrader search alert if you want phệ pounce on a Stanza. See Nissan Stanza models for sale

5. 2008 – 2014 Volkswagen Routan

2014 Volkswagen Routan
This VW Routan has the 3.6-liter V6, and Chrysler’s MyGig touchscreen infotainment system.

Everyone knows that VW has a long history of building people-carriers dating back phệ the original Type 2 (the quintessential 1960s hippie van). Those vans evolved into more purposeful (and rugged) Vanagon and Eurovan models, but VW was out of the people-hauler scene in the U.S. by the early 2000s. What phệ do? Talk phệ Chrysler, which churned out hundreds of thousands of vans annually.

Thus was born the VW Routan, the least-German vehicle ever phệ wear the most-German vehicle badge. Truthfully, the Routan wasn’t all that bad. While the 2008 Chrysler vans used as a basis reeked of DaimlerChrysler-era cost-cutting, they were still plenty spacious. And, with a 2011 update, they gained a strong 3.6-liter V6. By 2013, though, VW was essentially done. The automaker only ordered Routan minivans for fleet buyers.

Here’s a final-year one that escaped rental-fleet duty. It’s got an easy-clean vinyl interior, the 3.6-liter V6, and Chrysler’s decent (for the time) MyGig touchscreen infotainment system (which VW rebranded as, curiously, the “Joybox”). See Volkswagen Routan models for sale

Related:

  • 5 Unique, Obscure, and Weird Vans for Sale on Autotrader
  • Check Out This 1990 Chevrolet G20 Conversion Van With Under 20,000 Miles
  • The Sheer Number of Minivans GM Offered Is Astounding


Thông tin thêm

5 Minivans You’ve Probably Forgotten

#Minivans #Youve #Forgotten
[rule_3_plain] #Minivans #Youve #Forgotten

When we talk about minivans, we tend phệ think of big names (and big vehicles), but variously family-friendly people haulers have been tossed onto the market by a wide range of automakers.
Most of these arrived and then disappeared, barely registering a blip on shoppers’ radar. Here’s a look at five vans you may not have realized existed in the first place.

1. 2006 – 2010 Kia Rondo
Here’s a Kia Rondo for under $7,000 at a dealer in the Phoenix area.Kia was coming into its own in the mid-2000s when the automaker began expanding its lineup. No longer content with simply building cheap cars, Kia began pushing itself into different markets. One of the oddest was the mini-minivan segment, a popular body style in Europe that never caught on in the U.S. Looking more like a wagon or hatchback with an exceptionally high roofline, the Rondo cast an unusual shadow.

The model arrived here in 2006 and lasted through 2010. One thing it had in its favor was a low price: just $16,995 for the base 4-cylinder version in 2007. While not exactly lavish, it had six airbags, anti-lock brakes, alloy wheels, and a CD player. Families on a budget could add air conditioning and a small third-row seat for just $2,000 more. That money bought it on par with a base Dodge Caravan, which had crank windows and no side airbags.
The Rondo is still plenty cheap. Here’s an 81,000-mile high-option version for under $7,000 at a dealer in the Phoenix area. See Kia Rondo models for sale
2. 1988 – 1998 Mazda MPV
Here’s a Mazda MPV dressed up in All-Sport trim with 4-wheel drive at a dealer near Portland, Oregon.Mazda offered two models with the MPV, and they couldn’t have been more different. Mazda claimed the meant “Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicle,” which clearly means it should have been called the MPPV. The first version bowed in 1988. It was a precursor phệ the rounded-off SUV models soon dominating American driveways, yet it had only three passenger doors and cartoonish proportions. The original MPV came standard with rear-wheel drive and offered an off-road-ready part-time 4-wheel-drive option (albeit without low range). In contrast phệ more street-oriented vans with all-wheel drive, such as the Toyota Previa and Dodge Grand Caravan, the MPV wound up being marketed as an SUV alternative.
Initial demand was nóng but quickly tapered off. A revamp for 1996 brought more conventional SUV-like styling plus an additional front-hinged passenger door. At the time, it was the only SUV-ish thing in Mazda’s portfolio, but that wasn’t enough phệ save it. Mazda dropped the model after 1998.
These vans were rare sights when new, and they’re less common today. Still, here’s a final-year example dressed up in All-Sport trim with 4-wheel drive at a dealer near Portland, Oregon. It looks exceptionally well-preserved, even with over 165,000 miles showing. See Mazda MPV models for sale
3. 1991 – 1995 Mitsubishi Expo LRV/Eagle Summit/Dodge Colt Wagon/Plymouth Colt Vista
This short lived model was only offered between 1991 and a truncated 1995 model year.Take your pick. This lineup of Mitsubishi-designed mini people carriers wore many badges (none as great as Space Wagon in Japan). These were small vehicles with front- or all-wheel drive options, automatic or manual gearboxes, and a choice between 3-door short-wheelbase and 4-door long-wheelbase versions. However, this dizzying lineup of vans wasn’t enough phệ sway buyers, as it was only offered between 1991 and a truncated 1995 model year.
Still, these vans were neat high-roof models with seating for up phệ seven passengers in a long-wheelbase configuration. Those models stretched just 197.7 inches long, so they weren’t a good choice for hauling a basketball team phệ practice. At the end of their run, an all-wheel-drive Expo long-wheelbase model with everything Mitsubishi could throw at it (which wasn’t much, let’s be honest) was around $20,000. If you showed up phệ a Toyota dealer with that much cash in 1995, they’d show you the used-car lot. See Mitsubishi Expo models for sale or See Eagle Summit models for sale or See Dodge Colt models for sale or See Plymouth Colt models for sale
4. 1996 – 1998 Nissan Stanza Wagon
You’ll definitely want phệ set an Autotrader search alert if you want phệ pounce on a Stanza.The Nissan Stanza Wagon was decidedly ahead of its time when it arrived in the early 1980s. Inspired by a Giorgetto Giugiaro design, its angular lines surrounded an innovative interior accessed by dual sliding doors more than a decade before Chrysler would do such a thing. There was no B-pillar, which meant that a Stanza Wagon with its doors opened looked like the automotive equivalent of a dog-run or breezeway. Available inward-facing third-row jump seats offered additional utility, and buyers could have the Stanza Wagon with 4-wheel drive.
That’s a lot phệ take in — and it was too much for consumers since Nissan dropped the model after a 3-year run in 1988. You’ll definitely want phệ set an Autotrader search alert if you want phệ pounce on a Stanza. See Nissan Stanza models for sale
5. 2008 – 2014 Volkswagen Routan
This VW Routan has the 3.6-liter V6, and Chrysler’s MyGig touchscreen infotainment system.Everyone knows that VW has a long history of building people-carriers dating back phệ the original Type 2 (the quintessential 1960s hippie van). Those vans evolved into more purposeful (and rugged) Vanagon and Eurovan models, but VW was out of the people-hauler scene in the U.S. by the early 2000s. What phệ do? Talk phệ Chrysler, which churned out hundreds of thousands of vans annually.
Thus was born the VW Routan, the least-German vehicle ever phệ wear the most-German vehicle badge. Truthfully, the Routan wasn’t all that bad. While the 2008 Chrysler vans used as a basis reeked of DaimlerChrysler-era cost-cutting, they were still plenty spacious. And, with a 2011 update, they gained a strong 3.6-liter V6. By 2013, though, VW was essentially done. The automaker only ordered Routan minivans for fleet buyers.
Here’s a final-year one that escaped rental-fleet duty. It’s got an easy-clean vinyl interior, the 3.6-liter V6, and Chrysler’s decent (for the time) MyGig touchscreen infotainment system (which VW rebranded as, curiously, the “Joybox”). See Volkswagen Routan models for sale
Related:
5 Unique, Obscure, and Weird Vans for Sale on Autotrader
Check Out This 1990 Chevrolet G20 Conversion Van With Under 20,000 Miles
The Sheer Number of Minivans GM Offered Is Astounding

#Minivans #Youve #Forgotten
[rule_2_plain] #Minivans #Youve #Forgotten
[rule_2_plain] #Minivans #Youve #Forgotten
[rule_3_plain]

#Minivans #Youve #Forgotten

When we talk about minivans, we tend phệ think of big names (and big vehicles), but variously family-friendly people haulers have been tossed onto the market by a wide range of automakers.
Most of these arrived and then disappeared, barely registering a blip on shoppers’ radar. Here’s a look at five vans you may not have realized existed in the first place.

1. 2006 – 2010 Kia Rondo
Here’s a Kia Rondo for under $7,000 at a dealer in the Phoenix area.Kia was coming into its own in the mid-2000s when the automaker began expanding its lineup. No longer content with simply building cheap cars, Kia began pushing itself into different markets. One of the oddest was the mini-minivan segment, a popular body style in Europe that never caught on in the U.S. Looking more like a wagon or hatchback with an exceptionally high roofline, the Rondo cast an unusual shadow.

The model arrived here in 2006 and lasted through 2010. One thing it had in its favor was a low price: just $16,995 for the base 4-cylinder version in 2007. While not exactly lavish, it had six airbags, anti-lock brakes, alloy wheels, and a CD player. Families on a budget could add air conditioning and a small third-row seat for just $2,000 more. That money bought it on par with a base Dodge Caravan, which had crank windows and no side airbags.
The Rondo is still plenty cheap. Here’s an 81,000-mile high-option version for under $7,000 at a dealer in the Phoenix area. See Kia Rondo models for sale
2. 1988 – 1998 Mazda MPV
Here’s a Mazda MPV dressed up in All-Sport trim with 4-wheel drive at a dealer near Portland, Oregon.Mazda offered two models with the MPV, and they couldn’t have been more different. Mazda claimed the meant “Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicle,” which clearly means it should have been called the MPPV. The first version bowed in 1988. It was a precursor phệ the rounded-off SUV models soon dominating American driveways, yet it had only three passenger doors and cartoonish proportions. The original MPV came standard with rear-wheel drive and offered an off-road-ready part-time 4-wheel-drive option (albeit without low range). In contrast phệ more street-oriented vans with all-wheel drive, such as the Toyota Previa and Dodge Grand Caravan, the MPV wound up being marketed as an SUV alternative.
Initial demand was nóng but quickly tapered off. A revamp for 1996 brought more conventional SUV-like styling plus an additional front-hinged passenger door. At the time, it was the only SUV-ish thing in Mazda’s portfolio, but that wasn’t enough phệ save it. Mazda dropped the model after 1998.
These vans were rare sights when new, and they’re less common today. Still, here’s a final-year example dressed up in All-Sport trim with 4-wheel drive at a dealer near Portland, Oregon. It looks exceptionally well-preserved, even with over 165,000 miles showing. See Mazda MPV models for sale
3. 1991 – 1995 Mitsubishi Expo LRV/Eagle Summit/Dodge Colt Wagon/Plymouth Colt Vista
This short lived model was only offered between 1991 and a truncated 1995 model year.Take your pick. This lineup of Mitsubishi-designed mini people carriers wore many badges (none as great as Space Wagon in Japan). These were small vehicles with front- or all-wheel drive options, automatic or manual gearboxes, and a choice between 3-door short-wheelbase and 4-door long-wheelbase versions. However, this dizzying lineup of vans wasn’t enough phệ sway buyers, as it was only offered between 1991 and a truncated 1995 model year.
Still, these vans were neat high-roof models with seating for up phệ seven passengers in a long-wheelbase configuration. Those models stretched just 197.7 inches long, so they weren’t a good choice for hauling a basketball team phệ practice. At the end of their run, an all-wheel-drive Expo long-wheelbase model with everything Mitsubishi could throw at it (which wasn’t much, let’s be honest) was around $20,000. If you showed up phệ a Toyota dealer with that much cash in 1995, they’d show you the used-car lot. See Mitsubishi Expo models for sale or See Eagle Summit models for sale or See Dodge Colt models for sale or See Plymouth Colt models for sale
4. 1996 – 1998 Nissan Stanza Wagon
You’ll definitely want phệ set an Autotrader search alert if you want phệ pounce on a Stanza.The Nissan Stanza Wagon was decidedly ahead of its time when it arrived in the early 1980s. Inspired by a Giorgetto Giugiaro design, its angular lines surrounded an innovative interior accessed by dual sliding doors more than a decade before Chrysler would do such a thing. There was no B-pillar, which meant that a Stanza Wagon with its doors opened looked like the automotive equivalent of a dog-run or breezeway. Available inward-facing third-row jump seats offered additional utility, and buyers could have the Stanza Wagon with 4-wheel drive.
That’s a lot phệ take in — and it was too much for consumers since Nissan dropped the model after a 3-year run in 1988. You’ll definitely want phệ set an Autotrader search alert if you want phệ pounce on a Stanza. See Nissan Stanza models for sale
5. 2008 – 2014 Volkswagen Routan
This VW Routan has the 3.6-liter V6, and Chrysler’s MyGig touchscreen infotainment system.Everyone knows that VW has a long history of building people-carriers dating back phệ the original Type 2 (the quintessential 1960s hippie van). Those vans evolved into more purposeful (and rugged) Vanagon and Eurovan models, but VW was out of the people-hauler scene in the U.S. by the early 2000s. What phệ do? Talk phệ Chrysler, which churned out hundreds of thousands of vans annually.
Thus was born the VW Routan, the least-German vehicle ever phệ wear the most-German vehicle badge. Truthfully, the Routan wasn’t all that bad. While the 2008 Chrysler vans used as a basis reeked of DaimlerChrysler-era cost-cutting, they were still plenty spacious. And, with a 2011 update, they gained a strong 3.6-liter V6. By 2013, though, VW was essentially done. The automaker only ordered Routan minivans for fleet buyers.
Here’s a final-year one that escaped rental-fleet duty. It’s got an easy-clean vinyl interior, the 3.6-liter V6, and Chrysler’s decent (for the time) MyGig touchscreen infotainment system (which VW rebranded as, curiously, the “Joybox”). See Volkswagen Routan models for sale
Related:
5 Unique, Obscure, and Weird Vans for Sale on Autotrader
Check Out This 1990 Chevrolet G20 Conversion Van With Under 20,000 Miles
The Sheer Number of Minivans GM Offered Is Astounding

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