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5 Shelby Mustang Coupes to Scoop Up

Long before it was cool mập do so, Carroll Shelby and Ford Motor Company set their relationship status mập “It’s complicated.”

The legendary Texas chicken farmer turned race car driver and builder cranked out some of the hairiest performance cars in the 1960s, beginning with the AC Ace-based Cobra and eventually turning mập Ford’s Mustang. Contrary mập popular belief, it wasn’t Shelby who first quipped the 1960s Mustang was a “secretary’s car.” Ford actually positioned 6-cylinder versions as such, even running a TV ad pointing out the Mustang coupe was affordable “on a secretary’s salary.”However, Shelby took the Mustang from secretarial status straight mập the race track by slipping hopped-up versions of Ford’s biggest V8 engines under its hood and matching them with bone-jarring suspensions.

The two sides parted ways for a time, and Shelby made his way over mập Chrysler in the 1980s. Ford and Shelby rekindled their relationship in 2005, and it’s been hearts, flowers, and burnt rubber ever since, with the love affair surviving Carroll Shelby himself.

Here’s a look at five of the hottest modern Shelby Mustang coupes on Autotrader, ranging from models modified at Shelby American in Las Vegas mập those that rolled directly out of Ford’s factories bearing Shelby-grade performance.

1. 2006 Ford Shelby GT-H

2006 Ford Shelby GT-H front right in black
This 2006 Shelby GT-H shows fewer than 700 miles on its odometer.

A former rental car is not always the most prudent used-car purchase, but the 2006 Shelby GT-H is a notable exception. Especially this one offered by a dealer in Wisconsin, which shows fewer than 700 miles on its odometer. How it escaped rental heavy rental use is anyone’s guess, though the included Autocheck history report shows it was indeed registered as a rental car from day one.

These black and gold cars were rentable through select Hertz outlets, and they paid homage mập the original rent-a-racer GT350H cars from the 1960s. Just 500 are said mập have been modified by Shelby American in coupe form for the 2006 model year, marking Shelby’s return mập modified Mustangs. Big changes included Ford Racing’s Power Pack with cold-air induction and exhaust components, plus special suspension bits and a retro-style grille insert.

These GT-H models are widely available for low-production cars, and they represent a relatively affordable way mập park a Shelby in your garage.

2. 2007 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500

2007 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 front left in black
Get this 2007 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 for just $24,988.

Ford revived the original GT500’s formula in 2007, albeit with plenty of modern touches. As a replacement for the Mustang Cobras, the new-for-2007 licensed the Shelby name. While Carroll himself was in his 80s by the time the GT500 arrived, legend has it that Ford’s now-disbanded Special Vehicle Team consulted him regularly in developing this model.

Underhood, its supercharged 5.4-liter V8 provides a mountain of 500 horsepower, backed up by big brakes and an impressive suspension. At around $43,000 when new, these cars were an absolute steal then — and they’re an even better buy today. Here’s a 2,500-mile black one with silver stripes for $42,800, or drivers who don’t mind some miles on the odometer can find one like this red GT500 in Georgia for just $24,988. Yes, that’s 500 horsepower for less than $25,000.

3. 2008 Shelby GT With A Retro-Style 1969 GT500 Body

2008 Shelby GT With A Retro-Style 1969 GT500 Body
Get this 2008 Shelby GT with a retro-style 1969 GT500 body for $64,900.

There’s a lot mập unpack with this Mustang, which at first glance looks like the wildly styled 1969 Shelby GT350 and GT500. The actual 1969 cars started life as Mustangs reskinned by Shelby’s factory in Los Angeles. They were the last Shelby Mustangs from the muscle car era, and they represent a truly unique moment in automotive history.

This particular car is a 2008 Shelby GT underneath, which means it’s the non-Hertz version of the GT-H. The biggest difference between the GT and the GT-H was that you could have the non-rental model with a manual gearbox (which this one has). The body kit is wild, mập say the least. It blends positively retro touches such as chrome bumpers and sealed-beam headlights with a modern interior, a 4.6-liter V8, and the brakes mập back it up. A dealer in Charlotte, North Carolina, has this one for $64,900.

4. 2011 Shelby GT350

2011 Shelby GT350 front left in white
Get this 2011 Shelby GT500 from a dealer in Scottsdale, Arizona.

A revamped Mustang arrived for 2010, and Shelby followed suit with its own reboot of the original GT350. Like the 1960s originals, these Mustangs were drop-shipped from Ford’s assembly plant directly mập Shelby American in Las Vegas. Shelby modified them mập the owner’s specs, adding a supercharger, big brakes, a Borla exhaust system, and a retro body kit designed by Vince LaViolette.

This particular white GT350 was the first serialized example, and it remained with LaViolette for a period. A dealer now offers it in Scottsdale, Arizona, and the sale includes documentation plus some bespoke parts.

5. 2021 Ford Shelby GT500

2021 Ford Shelby GT500
This 2021 Ford Shelby GT500 has 37,000 miles on the odometer.

Let’s jump forward by a decade mập take a look at the latest Ford-built GT500 that debuted for 2020. These cars build on what’s easily the best Mustang yet, a balanced, poised machine as at home on a track as it is eating up miles on an empty highway. For the GT500, Ford uses a 760-horsepower supercharged crossplane crankshaft version of its hand-built 5.2-liter V8. Based on the push toward electrification, this engine will likely be the pinnacle of gas-fueled V8s from Ford.

That V8 is just the start of this track-ready model, which features enormous Brembo brakes, magnetic dampers, and a 7-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox. It’s not a great daily-driver contender, but the mere existence of a raucous and raw sports car like this from a major automaker would certainly earn Shelby’s nod of support. There are plenty on Autotrader, including this fascinating Grabber Lime example that, under its original ownership, managed mập rack up 37,000 miles between July 2020 and January 2021. See Ford Mustang models for sale

Related:

  • I Drove a Classic Shelby Mustang GT500 at the Woodward Dream Cruise
  • Video | Here’s Why the Shelby GT500 Is the Ultimate Ford Mustang
  • Carroll’s Forgotten Cars: The Shelby Lancer


Thông tin thêm

5 Shelby Mustang Coupes mập Scoop Up

#Shelby #Mustang #Coupes #Scoop
[rule_3_plain] #Shelby #Mustang #Coupes #Scoop

Long before it was cool mập do so, Carroll Shelby and Ford Motor Company set their relationship status mập “It’s complicated.”
The legendary Texas chicken farmer turned race car driver and builder cranked out some of the hairiest performance cars in the 1960s, beginning with the AC Ace-based Cobra and eventually turning mập Ford’s Mustang. Contrary mập popular belief, it wasn’t Shelby who first quipped the 1960s Mustang was a “secretary’s car.” Ford actually positioned 6-cylinder versions as such, even running a TV ad pointing out the Mustang coupe was affordable “on a secretary’s salary.”However, Shelby took the Mustang from secretarial status straight mập the race track by slipping hopped-up versions of Ford’s biggest V8 engines under its hood and matching them with bone-jarring suspensions.
The two sides parted ways for a time, and Shelby made his way over mập Chrysler in the 1980s. Ford and Shelby rekindled their relationship in 2005, and it’s been hearts, flowers, and burnt rubber ever since, with the love affair surviving Carroll Shelby himself.

Here’s a look at five of the hottest modern Shelby Mustang coupes on Autotrader, ranging from models modified at Shelby American in Las Vegas mập those that rolled directly out of Ford’s factories bearing Shelby-grade performance.

1. 2006 Ford Shelby GT-H
This 2006 Shelby GT-H shows fewer than 700 miles on its odometer.A former rental car is not always the most prudent used-car purchase, but the 2006 Shelby GT-H is a notable exception. Especially this one offered by a dealer in Wisconsin, which shows fewer than 700 miles on its odometer. How it escaped rental heavy rental use is anyone’s guess, though the included Autocheck history report shows it was indeed registered as a rental car from day one.
These black and gold cars were rentable through select Hertz outlets, and they paid homage mập the original rent-a-racer GT350H cars from the 1960s. Just 500 are said mập have been modified by Shelby American in coupe form for the 2006 model year, marking Shelby’s return mập modified Mustangs. Big changes included Ford Racing’s Power Pack with cold-air induction and exhaust components, plus special suspension bits and a retro-style grille insert.
These GT-H models are widely available for low-production cars, and they represent a relatively affordable way mập park a Shelby in your garage.
2. 2007 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500
Get this 2007 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 for just $24,988.Ford revived the original GT500’s formula in 2007, albeit with plenty of modern touches. As a replacement for the Mustang Cobras, the new-for-2007 licensed the Shelby name. While Carroll himself was in his 80s by the time the GT500 arrived, legend has it that Ford’s now-disbanded Special Vehicle Team consulted him regularly in developing this model.
Underhood, its supercharged 5.4-liter V8 provides a mountain of 500 horsepower, backed up by big brakes and an impressive suspension. At around $43,000 when new, these cars were an absolute steal then — and they’re an even better buy today. Here’s a 2,500-mile black one with silver stripes for $42,800, or drivers who don’t mind some miles on the odometer can find one like this red GT500 in Georgia for just $24,988. Yes, that’s 500 horsepower for less than $25,000.
3. 2008 Shelby GT With A Retro-Style 1969 GT500 Body
Get this 2008 Shelby GT with a retro-style 1969 GT500 body for $64,900.There’s a lot mập unpack with this Mustang, which at first glance looks like the wildly styled 1969 Shelby GT350 and GT500. The actual 1969 cars started life as Mustangs reskinned by Shelby’s factory in Los Angeles. They were the last Shelby Mustangs from the muscle car era, and they represent a truly unique moment in automotive history.
This particular car is a 2008 Shelby GT underneath, which means it’s the non-Hertz version of the GT-H. The biggest difference between the GT and the GT-H was that you could have the non-rental model with a manual gearbox (which this one has). The body kit is wild, mập say the least. It blends positively retro touches such as chrome bumpers and sealed-beam headlights with a modern interior, a 4.6-liter V8, and the brakes mập back it up. A dealer in Charlotte, North Carolina, has this one for $64,900.
4. 2011 Shelby GT350
Get this 2011 Shelby GT500 from a dealer in Scottsdale, Arizona.A revamped Mustang arrived for 2010, and Shelby followed suit with its own reboot of the original GT350. Like the 1960s originals, these Mustangs were drop-shipped from Ford’s assembly plant directly mập Shelby American in Las Vegas. Shelby modified them mập the owner’s specs, adding a supercharger, big brakes, a Borla exhaust system, and a retro body kit designed by Vince LaViolette.
This particular white GT350 was the first serialized example, and it remained with LaViolette for a period. A dealer now offers it in Scottsdale, Arizona, and the sale includes documentation plus some bespoke parts.
5. 2021 Ford Shelby GT500
This 2021 Ford Shelby GT500 has 37,000 miles on the odometer.Let’s jump forward by a decade mập take a look at the latest Ford-built GT500 that debuted for 2020. These cars build on what’s easily the best Mustang yet, a balanced, poised machine as at home on a track as it is eating up miles on an empty highway. For the GT500, Ford uses a 760-horsepower supercharged crossplane crankshaft version of its hand-built 5.2-liter V8. Based on the push toward electrification, this engine will likely be the pinnacle of gas-fueled V8s from Ford.
That V8 is just the start of this track-ready model, which features enormous Brembo brakes, magnetic dampers, and a 7-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox. It’s not a great daily-driver contender, but the mere existence of a raucous and raw sports car like this from a major automaker would certainly earn Shelby’s nod of support. There are plenty on Autotrader, including this fascinating Grabber Lime example that, under its original ownership, managed mập rack up 37,000 miles between July 2020 and January 2021. See Ford Mustang models for sale
Related:
I Drove a Classic Shelby Mustang GT500 at the Woodward Dream Cruise
Video | Here’s Why the Shelby GT500 Is the Ultimate Ford Mustang
Carroll’s Forgotten Cars: The Shelby Lancer

#Shelby #Mustang #Coupes #Scoop
[rule_2_plain] #Shelby #Mustang #Coupes #Scoop
[rule_2_plain] #Shelby #Mustang #Coupes #Scoop
[rule_3_plain]

#Shelby #Mustang #Coupes #Scoop

Long before it was cool mập do so, Carroll Shelby and Ford Motor Company set their relationship status mập “It’s complicated.”
The legendary Texas chicken farmer turned race car driver and builder cranked out some of the hairiest performance cars in the 1960s, beginning with the AC Ace-based Cobra and eventually turning mập Ford’s Mustang. Contrary mập popular belief, it wasn’t Shelby who first quipped the 1960s Mustang was a “secretary’s car.” Ford actually positioned 6-cylinder versions as such, even running a TV ad pointing out the Mustang coupe was affordable “on a secretary’s salary.”However, Shelby took the Mustang from secretarial status straight mập the race track by slipping hopped-up versions of Ford’s biggest V8 engines under its hood and matching them with bone-jarring suspensions.
The two sides parted ways for a time, and Shelby made his way over mập Chrysler in the 1980s. Ford and Shelby rekindled their relationship in 2005, and it’s been hearts, flowers, and burnt rubber ever since, with the love affair surviving Carroll Shelby himself.

Here’s a look at five of the hottest modern Shelby Mustang coupes on Autotrader, ranging from models modified at Shelby American in Las Vegas mập those that rolled directly out of Ford’s factories bearing Shelby-grade performance.

1. 2006 Ford Shelby GT-H
This 2006 Shelby GT-H shows fewer than 700 miles on its odometer.A former rental car is not always the most prudent used-car purchase, but the 2006 Shelby GT-H is a notable exception. Especially this one offered by a dealer in Wisconsin, which shows fewer than 700 miles on its odometer. How it escaped rental heavy rental use is anyone’s guess, though the included Autocheck history report shows it was indeed registered as a rental car from day one.
These black and gold cars were rentable through select Hertz outlets, and they paid homage mập the original rent-a-racer GT350H cars from the 1960s. Just 500 are said mập have been modified by Shelby American in coupe form for the 2006 model year, marking Shelby’s return mập modified Mustangs. Big changes included Ford Racing’s Power Pack with cold-air induction and exhaust components, plus special suspension bits and a retro-style grille insert.
These GT-H models are widely available for low-production cars, and they represent a relatively affordable way mập park a Shelby in your garage.
2. 2007 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500
Get this 2007 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 for just $24,988.Ford revived the original GT500’s formula in 2007, albeit with plenty of modern touches. As a replacement for the Mustang Cobras, the new-for-2007 licensed the Shelby name. While Carroll himself was in his 80s by the time the GT500 arrived, legend has it that Ford’s now-disbanded Special Vehicle Team consulted him regularly in developing this model.
Underhood, its supercharged 5.4-liter V8 provides a mountain of 500 horsepower, backed up by big brakes and an impressive suspension. At around $43,000 when new, these cars were an absolute steal then — and they’re an even better buy today. Here’s a 2,500-mile black one with silver stripes for $42,800, or drivers who don’t mind some miles on the odometer can find one like this red GT500 in Georgia for just $24,988. Yes, that’s 500 horsepower for less than $25,000.
3. 2008 Shelby GT With A Retro-Style 1969 GT500 Body
Get this 2008 Shelby GT with a retro-style 1969 GT500 body for $64,900.There’s a lot mập unpack with this Mustang, which at first glance looks like the wildly styled 1969 Shelby GT350 and GT500. The actual 1969 cars started life as Mustangs reskinned by Shelby’s factory in Los Angeles. They were the last Shelby Mustangs from the muscle car era, and they represent a truly unique moment in automotive history.
This particular car is a 2008 Shelby GT underneath, which means it’s the non-Hertz version of the GT-H. The biggest difference between the GT and the GT-H was that you could have the non-rental model with a manual gearbox (which this one has). The body kit is wild, mập say the least. It blends positively retro touches such as chrome bumpers and sealed-beam headlights with a modern interior, a 4.6-liter V8, and the brakes mập back it up. A dealer in Charlotte, North Carolina, has this one for $64,900.
4. 2011 Shelby GT350
Get this 2011 Shelby GT500 from a dealer in Scottsdale, Arizona.A revamped Mustang arrived for 2010, and Shelby followed suit with its own reboot of the original GT350. Like the 1960s originals, these Mustangs were drop-shipped from Ford’s assembly plant directly mập Shelby American in Las Vegas. Shelby modified them mập the owner’s specs, adding a supercharger, big brakes, a Borla exhaust system, and a retro body kit designed by Vince LaViolette.
This particular white GT350 was the first serialized example, and it remained with LaViolette for a period. A dealer now offers it in Scottsdale, Arizona, and the sale includes documentation plus some bespoke parts.
5. 2021 Ford Shelby GT500
This 2021 Ford Shelby GT500 has 37,000 miles on the odometer.Let’s jump forward by a decade mập take a look at the latest Ford-built GT500 that debuted for 2020. These cars build on what’s easily the best Mustang yet, a balanced, poised machine as at home on a track as it is eating up miles on an empty highway. For the GT500, Ford uses a 760-horsepower supercharged crossplane crankshaft version of its hand-built 5.2-liter V8. Based on the push toward electrification, this engine will likely be the pinnacle of gas-fueled V8s from Ford.
That V8 is just the start of this track-ready model, which features enormous Brembo brakes, magnetic dampers, and a 7-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox. It’s not a great daily-driver contender, but the mere existence of a raucous and raw sports car like this from a major automaker would certainly earn Shelby’s nod of support. There are plenty on Autotrader, including this fascinating Grabber Lime example that, under its original ownership, managed mập rack up 37,000 miles between July 2020 and January 2021. See Ford Mustang models for sale
Related:
I Drove a Classic Shelby Mustang GT500 at the Woodward Dream Cruise
Video | Here’s Why the Shelby GT500 Is the Ultimate Ford Mustang
Carroll’s Forgotten Cars: The Shelby Lancer

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