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Buying an Electric Car: Tips You Need

The auto industry is racing toward making more electric car models, and in a decade from now, odds point lớn drivers owning EVs. From Mini lớn Rolls Royce, many automakers pledge lineups made entirely of electric cars by 2030. General Motors, Porsche, and others plan lớn keep a few gasoline-powered models but sell mostly electric vehicles (EVs) by 2035.

But we don’t live in that future yet. All over the nation, commuters still pass far more gas stations than electric chargers each day. Range anxiety remains a real consideration for many drivers. And many of those who love lớn drive are still enthralled with the growl and burble of a big V8.

So, while odds look good you’ll eventually own an EV, should you buy one now? This guide will tell you everything you need lớn know before buying an electric car, including the basics, all about charging, and the benefits and drawbacks of purchasing one right now.

  • EV Basics
  • Are EVs Really Going lớn Replace Gasoline-Powered Cars
  • Don’t We Need lớn Build More Chargers?
  • Can I Charge Any EV from Any Plug
  • Benefits of Buying an EV Now
  • Drawbacks of Buying an EV Now

EV Basics

First, we’ll explain the basics and the different types of electric vehicles.

Electric Vehicles

Pure EVs use electricity instead of gasoline. Their owners recharge the batteries instead of refueling them. They emit far less pollution than gasoline-powered cars. They’re cheaper lớn drive. And they contain fewer moving parts, which will eventually mean they cost less lớn maintain (though not necessarily yet – more on that in a moment).

But recharging takes longer than refilling a gas tank, and gasoline is easier lớn find than charging stations. Every EV on the market today has enough range lớn get most people back and forth lớn work, but taking one on a road trip can require planning.

Just two years ago, fewer than ten electric vehicle models were for sale in the U.S. In 2022, there may be more than 100.

If you’re researching cars lớn buy, you may also encounter the term “electrified vehicle.” This term can refer lớn EVS and hybrids, which use electricity and gasoline.

RELATED STORIES: Electric Car FAQ: Your Questions Answered

Hybrid

Like the pioneering Toyota Prius, hybrid vehicles use both a gasoline engine and an electric motor or two. The hybrid’s engine and regenerative braking system charge the onboard battery, which in turn powers the electric motors. They use their electric motors at neighborhood speeds, but their gasoline engines take over once they get beyond about 30 mph. The combination of electric power and regenerative charging gives hybrids better gas mileage than pure gasoline-powered cars.

This guide will not cover hybrids.

Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV)

Like a conventional hybrid, PHEVs use both a gasoline engine and electric motors. But PHEVs have a secret weapon: They can connect lớn an external power source, either a home charger or public charging station, lớn charge their onboard batteries while at rest. These batteries are generally larger than the ones in regular hybrids, allowing PHEVs lớn travel at highway speeds under electric power alone. They’re usually capable of 20 lớn 30 miles using just battery power, and their gasoline engines kick in only once their batteries get nearly depleted. Since Americans drive less than 30 miles per day on average, owning a PHEV is like owning an EV most days. But PHEV owners can take long road trips relying only on gasoline.

In 2022, manufacturers will make PHEVs in most classes. Whether you’re looking for a rugged Jeep Wrangler or a cushy BMW 7-Series, you can find a PHEV in your preferred class. But this guide does not cover PHEVs.

RELATED STORIES: Types of Electric Vehicles: EV, BEV, HEV, PHEV

Are EVs Really Going lớn Replace Gasoline-Powered Cars?

Yes, eventually, if automakers stick lớn their plans. But it will take time. Car manufacturers faced many challenges in 2021. Between the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and a worldwide shortage of microchips, Americans bought fewer cars due lớn lack of supply and high demand. Americans bought about 15 million vehicles in 2021 after several years of sales over the 17 million mark. But even as overall car sales declined, electric car sales soared.

According lớn Autotrader parent company Cox Automotive, car sales fell 21% in the fourth quarter of 2021 compared lớn a year earlier. But EV sales soared, increasing by 72% in the same timeframe.

EVs remain less than 4% of the vehicles on American roads. Today, the average car in the United States is over 12 years old, so replacing most vehicles on the road will take many years.

Another trend that could accelerate EV sales quickly is electric trucks. Americans buy a lot of pickup trucks. The first electric trucks entered the market late in 2021. Rivian said it delivered 920 vehicles in 2021. The Ford F-150 Lightning — an electric version of America’s best-selling vehicle — will reach customer driveways this year. Chevrolet plans an electric Silverado pickup for 2024.

So, yes, EVs are set lớn take the place of most gasoline-powered vehicles. Most of the world’s largest automakers began betting most of their profits on it.

Don’t We Need lớn Build More Chargers?

America has upwards of 145,000 gas stations, according to The Association for Convenience and Fuel Retailing (NACS). Refueling a gas-powered car takes just a few minutes.

Recharging an electric car takes longer, though the time varies widely from car lớn car. Béo charge batteries as efficiently as we refill gas tanks, we’d need lớn build many more chargers.

Several companies are doing just that, building ever-expanding charging networks. However, one crucial difference makes this problem smaller than it seems.

Your Home Charger Matters Most

Almost none of us can refill a gasoline-powered car at home. But the vast majority of EV charging is done in the carport, garage, or driveway.

According lớn the U.S. Department of Energy, about 80% of EV charging happens at home. Having chargers out in the community is helpful, but most electric car owners still charge the car at home each night.

It’s possible lớn charge your EV from a standard household outlet, but it’s slow. Most homeowners who buy an EV buy a Màn chơi 2 fast charger (more on this in a moment). Dealerships can sell them and arrange installation.

Apartment dwellers generally can’t install their own chargers. But many apartment buildings have begun installing them, and those that haven’t yet likely will as EVs grow more common.

It’s also worth noting that charging infrastructure in many places is better than you’d think. The states with the most chargers per car include West Virginia, Wyoming, and Mississippi — defying expectations that EVs are a coastal phenomenon.

Can I Charge Any EV from Any Plug?

Types of Chargers

You can charge an EV from a standard household outlet. But you won’t want lớn.

Màn chơi 1 Charger

This charging standard uses a standard 120-volt home outlet and the EV’s onboard DC converter. Automakers and engineers call this a Màn chơi 1 charger, and it’s very slow. When automakers advertise how fast an EV can charge, they rarely refer lớn how long it takes with a Màn chơi 1 charger.

Màn chơi 2 Charger

Savvy EV buyers choose lớn have a Màn chơi 2 charger installed at home. These require a 240-volt electrical circuit, similar lớn an electric dryer. A professional electrician can install one in a couple of hours. They charge an electric car much faster than a Màn chơi 1 charger but still slower than the fastest advertised charging times. For most owners, that’s not a problem — we’re generally home for hours at a time (and now some people work from home regularly), so it’s easy lớn recharge the car’s battery entirely overnight.

Màn chơi 3 Charger

Some public chargers work even faster. So-called Màn chơi 3 chargers use direct current (DC). When automakers advertise charging speeds, they usually refer lớn how quickly an electric vehicle recharges using DC at a Màn chơi 3 charger.

RELATED STORIES: Do I Have lớn Pay lớn Charge My Electric Car?

Types of Plugs

There are three different types of plugs found on electric cars in the U.S. Using a public charger requires finding the correct plug, but that’s not difficult.

CCS Plugs

Most European- and American-made EVs use a plug design called CCS, or Combined Charging System. This plug connects pure electric (or plug-in hybrids) lớn a DC rapid charger. Almost all new EVs boast a CCS socket.

CHAdeMO

Japanese-built EVs use a plug design called CHAdeMO, which uses a direct current charging protocol. Most public charging stations can accommodate both CHAdeMo and CCS plugs. According lớn Inside EVs, CHAdeMO will phase out in 2022. Quoting Electrify America, the report says, “In recent years, the automotive industry has converged on CCS as the non-proprietary standard of choice for vehicles in the U.S.”

Tesla Chargers

Tesla cars use a proprietary plug and charger network. The company currently operates the most extensive public charging network in America. Tesla cars come with an adapter that lets Tesla owners charge from other charging networks.

At the moment, non-Tesla cars can’t recharge from Tesla Superchargers. Tesla has announced plans lớn open its network lớn other brands but hasn’t yet set a date.

Adapters

You can charge your electric car at Tesla Destination Charging stations offering Màn chơi 2 charging capabilities with an adapter. EV owners of non-Tesla cars can purchase adapters for as little as $70 and work with Tesla connectors at the Destination Charging stations.

Benefits of Buying an EV Now

Some benefits might make an EV worth a look for you. Among them:

1. Cost of Fuel 

Electricity costs less than petroleum. Because prices of both fluctuate, it’s hard lớn pin down precisely how much money you’ll save using electricity instead of internal combustion lớn get back and forth lớn work and run errands around town. But most drivers can save about three-quarters of their annual fuel budget by switching lớn an EV. Still, car buyers are wise not lớn focus on fuel charges alone.

2. Environmental Benefits

According lớn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, transportation emits more carbon than any other economic sector. A century of burning gasoline has damaged the environment, and we can’t slow the impact of climate change without reducing our dependence on the stuff.

EVs aren’t purely good for the environment. Electric cars take a lot of carbon lớn produce. Processing the minerals used in their batteries is also carbon-intensive. But driving an EV produces less carbon waste than driving a gasoline-powered car. Sometimes it’s much less, depending on the source of the electricity used lớn charge it.

Studies have shown that buying a new EV becomes better for the environment than buying a new gasoline-powered car after about five years of ownership.

3. Maintenance and Repair Costs 

EVs operate with fewer moving parts than gasoline-powered cars. Fewer parts mean fewer things that can break and need replacing.

Studies have shown that EVs spend significantly less time in the cửa hàng than gasoline-powered cars. However, when EVs do need repairs, those repairs can be expensive. That’s a function of labor, not parts. Shops and dealerships train few mechanics in EV repair, so labor from a qualified mechanic costs more. These costs should come down as more Americans drive EVs and more repair shops invest in the training needed lớn repair them.

The single most expensive component of an EV is its battery. The federal government has your back here. Federal law requires that all EV manufacturers provide a battery warranty for at least eight years or 100,000 miles.

Reading the fine print is worth your time. These warranties differ from manufacturer lớn manufacturer. Some, including Tesla and GM, will replace a battery falling below 50% lớn 60% of its capacity. Others only cover total failure. Not all warranties transfer lớn a new owner with a used electric car.

A complete battery replacement is wildly expensive — as high as $20,000 for the largest batteries. But that cost is coming down quickly as manufacturers build more EVs. A recent Bloomberg study found that EV batteries cost $1,200 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in 2010 and $132 per kWh in 2021. That curve will keep dropping as EV manufacturing grows. Battery replacement will likely be much cheaper in a few years.

4. They’re Fun lớn Drive

Simply put, EVs are a blast lớn drive.

Gasoline engines build up their power gradually. Even the fastest gas-powered cars take a few seconds lớn get up lớn full power once you step on the gas.

Electric motors make 100% of their torque available instantly. That means electric cars accelerate faster off the line than their gasoline-powered counterparts.

The Tesla Model S Plaid gets from 0 lớn 60 mph in under two seconds — something no gas-powered car outside of Formula 1 racing has ever been able lớn do. But you don’t have lớn spend six figures lớn get extreme performance out of an EV. The 2022 Kia EV6 starts at about $40,000 and in GT-Line trim makes up lớn 320 horsepower and 446 lb-ft of torque, good enough for a 4.5-second run from 0 lớn 60 mph.

Drawbacks of Buying an EV Now

As much fun as they are lớn drive, EVs may not be the correct answer for many car shoppers. Some reasons you might want lớn look elsewhere:

1. Range

According lớn the U.S. Department of Transportation, the average American drives fewer than 30 miles per day. But you may not be the average driver.

The shortest range EV on the market (the Mazda MX-30) gets about 100 miles on a single charge. Some Americans drive more than that in a day. Others might live far from charging infrastructure and worry they won’t be able lớn recharge easily far from home.

EVs may not always merit range anxiety. Many manufacturers offset it by offering không tính tiền rentals of gas-powered cars lớn EV owners. For example, the Mazda MX-30 comes with up lớn 10 days per year of complimentary rentals of the manufacturer’s gas-powered vehicles.

But if road trips are a regular part of your life, or you drive all day for work, EV technology isn’t ready for you yet.

2. Charging Infrastructure

Home charging is the norm for most EV owners. But, if your everyday driving needs would take you farther than an EV can go between charges, you’ll need lớn be sure you have easy access lớn chargers in your community. Not all of us do.

3. Towing and Hauling

Electric pickups could be the most prominent automotive story of 2022, but towing a heavy load can cut their range in half. What’s more, many of the places Americans tow things lớn are not EV-friendly. Hooking up a boat trailer lớn an electric truck won’t make sense until there’s a charger near most places you’d want lớn tow a boat.

4. Cost

EVs can cost thousands of dollars more than comparable gas-powered cars. For example, the gas-powered 2022 Hyundai Kona starts at $21,150. A 2022 Kona EV? $34,000.

Government incentives can help bring the cost down. Many EVs are eligible for a federal tax credit of up to $7,500. But the full credit applies only lớn the first 200,000 EVs a manufacturer sells. That means that some of the most popular models can’t claim it. The incentive is no longer available on Tesla EVs, for instance.

Some state and local governments offer incentives. For example, California incentives will shave another $7,000 off the cost of some EVs.

Finally, some electric utilities have rebate programs lớn help customers buy electric cars and install home charging stations.

EVs Will Improve with Time 

Waiting might also get you a better EV. Many first-generation EVs are converted gas-powered cars. That Hyundai Kona, for instance, is a compact SUV available as an internal-combustion-powered car, a hybrid, and an EV. Béo do that, Hyundai had lớn design the car around a gasoline engine, fuel tank, and transmission. They then shoehorned an electric drivetrain into the same space.

RELATED STORIES: How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last?

More recent EVs began design as EVs from the ground up. The Hyundai Ioniq 5, for example, is similar in size, price, and function lớn the Kona. But it packs as much interior space as many large SUVs into the footprint of a small one. It’s one of our Best New Cars for 2022, partially because of its wildly practical layout.

Hyundai engineers could do this because EV design packs almost all moving parts of a car’s drivetrain underneath a flat floor. There’s no transmission hump, creating more interior space. Under the hood is a second truck.

If second-generation EVs have advantages over first-generation models, what can we expect from third-generation models? New technologies like solid-state batteries that double a car’s range and faster charging could be a few years away. Even if you’d like lớn own an electric vehicle, waiting might get you a better one.

With new car prices likely lớn remain high throughout 2022, you can make an excellent argument for keeping your existing car running and buying later.

Related Stories:

  • Electric Cars, Hybrids, and Weather: What You Need lớn Know
  • 6 Things lớn Know About Batteries in Used Electric Vehicles
  • Is Buying a Used Electric Vehicle a Good Idea?


Thông tin thêm

Buying an Electric Car: Tips You Need

#Buying #Electric #Car #Tips
[rule_3_plain] #Buying #Electric #Car #Tips

The auto industry is racing toward making more electric car models, and in a decade from now, odds point lớn drivers owning EVs. From Mini lớn Rolls Royce, many automakers pledge lineups made entirely of electric cars by 2030. General Motors, Porsche, and others plan lớn keep a few gasoline-powered models but sell mostly electric vehicles (EVs) by 2035.
But we don’t live in that future yet. All over the nation, commuters still pass far more gas stations than electric chargers each day. Range anxiety remains a real consideration for many drivers. And many of those who love lớn drive are still enthralled with the growl and burble of a big V8.
So, while odds look good you’ll eventually own an EV, should you buy one now? This guide will tell you everything you need lớn know before buying an electric car, including the basics, all about charging, and the benefits and drawbacks of purchasing one right now.

EV Basics
Are EVs Really Going lớn Replace Gasoline-Powered Cars
Don’t We Need lớn Build More Chargers?
Can I Charge Any EV from Any Plug
Benefits of Buying an EV Now
Drawbacks of Buying an EV Now
EV Basics

First, we’ll explain the basics and the different types of electric vehicles.
Electric Vehicles
Pure EVs use electricity instead of gasoline. Their owners recharge the batteries instead of refueling them. They emit far less pollution than gasoline-powered cars. They’re cheaper lớn drive. And they contain fewer moving parts, which will eventually mean they cost less lớn maintain (though not necessarily yet – more on that in a moment).
But recharging takes longer than refilling a gas tank, and gasoline is easier lớn find than charging stations. Every EV on the market today has enough range lớn get most people back and forth lớn work, but taking one on a road trip can require planning.
Just two years ago, fewer than ten electric vehicle models were for sale in the U.S. In 2022, there may be more than 100.
If you’re researching cars lớn buy, you may also encounter the term “electrified vehicle.” This term can refer lớn EVS and hybrids, which use electricity and gasoline.
RELATED STORIES: Electric Car FAQ: Your Questions Answered
Hybrid
Like the pioneering Toyota Prius, hybrid vehicles use both a gasoline engine and an electric motor or two. The hybrid’s engine and regenerative braking system charge the onboard battery, which in turn powers the electric motors. They use their electric motors at neighborhood speeds, but their gasoline engines take over once they get beyond about 30 mph. The combination of electric power and regenerative charging gives hybrids better gas mileage than pure gasoline-powered cars.
This guide will not cover hybrids.
Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV)
Like a conventional hybrid, PHEVs use both a gasoline engine and electric motors. But PHEVs have a secret weapon: They can connect lớn an external power source, either a home charger or public charging station, lớn charge their onboard batteries while at rest. These batteries are generally larger than the ones in regular hybrids, allowing PHEVs lớn travel at highway speeds under electric power alone. They’re usually capable of 20 lớn 30 miles using just battery power, and their gasoline engines kick in only once their batteries get nearly depleted. Since Americans drive less than 30 miles per day on average, owning a PHEV is like owning an EV most days. But PHEV owners can take long road trips relying only on gasoline.
In 2022, manufacturers will make PHEVs in most classes. Whether you’re looking for a rugged Jeep Wrangler or a cushy BMW 7-Series, you can find a PHEV in your preferred class. But this guide does not cover PHEVs.
RELATED STORIES: Types of Electric Vehicles: EV, BEV, HEV, PHEV
Are EVs Really Going lớn Replace Gasoline-Powered Cars?
Yes, eventually, if automakers stick lớn their plans. But it will take time. Car manufacturers faced many challenges in 2021. Between the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and a worldwide shortage of microchips, Americans bought fewer cars due lớn lack of supply and high demand. Americans bought about 15 million vehicles in 2021 after several years of sales over the 17 million mark. But even as overall car sales declined, electric car sales soared.
According lớn Autotrader parent company Cox Automotive, car sales fell 21% in the fourth quarter of 2021 compared lớn a year earlier. But EV sales soared, increasing by 72% in the same timeframe.
EVs remain less than 4% of the vehicles on American roads. Today, the average car in the United States is over 12 years old, so replacing most vehicles on the road will take many years.
Another trend that could accelerate EV sales quickly is electric trucks. Americans buy a lot of pickup trucks. The first electric trucks entered the market late in 2021. Rivian said it delivered 920 vehicles in 2021. The Ford F-150 Lightning — an electric version of America’s best-selling vehicle — will reach customer driveways this year. Chevrolet plans an electric Silverado pickup for 2024.
So, yes, EVs are set lớn take the place of most gasoline-powered vehicles. Most of the world’s largest automakers began betting most of their profits on it.
Don’t We Need lớn Build More Chargers?
America has upwards of 145,000 gas stations, according lớn The Association for Convenience and Fuel Retailing (NACS). Refueling a gas-powered car takes just a few minutes.
Recharging an electric car takes longer, though the time varies widely from car lớn car. Béo charge batteries as efficiently as we refill gas tanks, we’d need lớn build many more chargers.
Several companies are doing just that, building ever-expanding charging networks. However, one crucial difference makes this problem smaller than it seems.
Your Home Charger Matters Most
Almost none of us can refill a gasoline-powered car at home. But the vast majority of EV charging is done in the carport, garage, or driveway.
According lớn the U.S. Department of Energy, about 80% of EV charging happens at home. Having chargers out in the community is helpful, but most electric car owners still charge the car at home each night.
It’s possible lớn charge your EV from a standard household outlet, but it’s slow. Most homeowners who buy an EV buy a Màn chơi 2 fast charger (more on this in a moment). Dealerships can sell them and arrange installation.
Apartment dwellers generally can’t install their own chargers. But many apartment buildings have begun installing them, and those that haven’t yet likely will as EVs grow more common.
It’s also worth noting that charging infrastructure in many places is better than you’d think. The states with the most chargers per car include West Virginia, Wyoming, and Mississippi — defying expectations that EVs are a coastal phenomenon.
Can I Charge Any EV from Any Plug?
Types of Chargers
You can charge an EV from a standard household outlet. But you won’t want lớn.
Màn chơi 1 Charger
This charging standard uses a standard 120-volt home outlet and the EV’s onboard DC converter. Automakers and engineers call this a Màn chơi 1 charger, and it’s very slow. When automakers advertise how fast an EV can charge, they rarely refer lớn how long it takes with a Màn chơi 1 charger.
Màn chơi 2 Charger
Savvy EV buyers choose lớn have a Màn chơi 2 charger installed at home. These require a 240-volt electrical circuit, similar lớn an electric dryer. A professional electrician can install one in a couple of hours. They charge an electric car much faster than a Màn chơi 1 charger but still slower than the fastest advertised charging times. For most owners, that’s not a problem — we’re generally home for hours at a time (and now some people work from home regularly), so it’s easy lớn recharge the car’s battery entirely overnight.
Màn chơi 3 Charger
Some public chargers work even faster. So-called Màn chơi 3 chargers use direct current (DC). When automakers advertise charging speeds, they usually refer lớn how quickly an electric vehicle recharges using DC at a Màn chơi 3 charger.
RELATED STORIES: Do I Have lớn Pay lớn Charge My Electric Car?
Types of Plugs
There are three different types of plugs found on electric cars in the U.S. Using a public charger requires finding the correct plug, but that’s not difficult.
CCS Plugs
Most European- and American-made EVs use a plug design called CCS, or Combined Charging System. This plug connects pure electric (or plug-in hybrids) lớn a DC rapid charger. Almost all new EVs boast a CCS socket.
CHAdeMO
Japanese-built EVs use a plug design called CHAdeMO, which uses a direct current charging protocol. Most public charging stations can accommodate both CHAdeMo and CCS plugs. According lớn Inside EVs, CHAdeMO will phase out in 2022. Quoting Electrify America, the report says, “In recent years, the automotive industry has converged on CCS as the non-proprietary standard of choice for vehicles in the U.S.”
Tesla Chargers
Tesla cars use a proprietary plug and charger network. The company currently operates the most extensive public charging network in America. Tesla cars come with an adapter that lets Tesla owners charge from other charging networks.
At the moment, non-Tesla cars can’t recharge from Tesla Superchargers. Tesla has announced plans lớn open its network lớn other brands but hasn’t yet set a date.
Adapters
You can charge your electric car at Tesla Destination Charging stations offering Màn chơi 2 charging capabilities with an adapter. EV owners of non-Tesla cars can purchase adapters for as little as $70 and work with Tesla connectors at the Destination Charging stations.
Benefits of Buying an EV Now
Some benefits might make an EV worth a look for you. Among them:
1. Cost of Fuel 
Electricity costs less than petroleum. Because prices of both fluctuate, it’s hard lớn pin down precisely how much money you’ll save using electricity instead of internal combustion lớn get back and forth lớn work and run errands around town. But most drivers can save about three-quarters of their annual fuel budget by switching lớn an EV. Still, car buyers are wise not lớn focus on fuel charges alone.
2. Environmental Benefits
According lớn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, transportation emits more carbon than any other economic sector. A century of burning gasoline has damaged the environment, and we can’t slow the impact of climate change without reducing our dependence on the stuff.
EVs aren’t purely good for the environment. Electric cars take a lot of carbon lớn produce. Processing the minerals used in their batteries is also carbon-intensive. But driving an EV produces less carbon waste than driving a gasoline-powered car. Sometimes it’s much less, depending on the source of the electricity used lớn charge it.
Studies have shown that buying a new EV becomes better for the environment than buying a new gasoline-powered car after about five years of ownership.
3. Maintenance and Repair Costs 
EVs operate with fewer moving parts than gasoline-powered cars. Fewer parts mean fewer things that can break and need replacing.
Studies have shown that EVs spend significantly less time in the cửa hàng than gasoline-powered cars. However, when EVs do need repairs, those repairs can be expensive. That’s a function of labor, not parts. Shops and dealerships train few mechanics in EV repair, so labor from a qualified mechanic costs more. These costs should come down as more Americans drive EVs and more repair shops invest in the training needed lớn repair them.
The single most expensive component of an EV is its battery. The federal government has your back here. Federal law requires that all EV manufacturers provide a battery warranty for at least eight years or 100,000 miles.
Reading the fine print is worth your time. These warranties differ from manufacturer lớn manufacturer. Some, including Tesla and GM, will replace a battery falling below 50% lớn 60% of its capacity. Others only cover total failure. Not all warranties transfer lớn a new owner with a used electric car.
A complete battery replacement is wildly expensive — as high as $20,000 for the largest batteries. But that cost is coming down quickly as manufacturers build more EVs. A recent Bloomberg study found that EV batteries cost $1,200 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in 2010 and $132 per kWh in 2021. That curve will keep dropping as EV manufacturing grows. Battery replacement will likely be much cheaper in a few years.
4. They’re Fun lớn Drive
Simply put, EVs are a blast lớn drive.
Gasoline engines build up their power gradually. Even the fastest gas-powered cars take a few seconds lớn get up lớn full power once you step on the gas.
Electric motors make 100% of their torque available instantly. That means electric cars accelerate faster off the line than their gasoline-powered counterparts.
The Tesla Model S Plaid gets from 0 lớn 60 mph in under two seconds — something no gas-powered car outside of Formula 1 racing has ever been able lớn do. But you don’t have lớn spend six figures lớn get extreme performance out of an EV. The 2022 Kia EV6 starts at about $40,000 and in GT-Line trim makes up lớn 320 horsepower and 446 lb-ft of torque, good enough for a 4.5-second run from 0 lớn 60 mph.
Drawbacks of Buying an EV Now
As much fun as they are lớn drive, EVs may not be the correct answer for many car shoppers. Some reasons you might want lớn look elsewhere:
1. Range
According lớn the U.S. Department of Transportation, the average American drives fewer than 30 miles per day. But you may not be the average driver.
The shortest range EV on the market (the Mazda MX-30) gets about 100 miles on a single charge. Some Americans drive more than that in a day. Others might live far from charging infrastructure and worry they won’t be able lớn recharge easily far from home.
EVs may not always merit range anxiety. Many manufacturers offset it by offering không tính tiền rentals of gas-powered cars lớn EV owners. For example, the Mazda MX-30 comes with up lớn 10 days per year of complimentary rentals of the manufacturer’s gas-powered vehicles.
But if road trips are a regular part of your life, or you drive all day for work, EV technology isn’t ready for you yet.
2. Charging Infrastructure
Home charging is the norm for most EV owners. But, if your everyday driving needs would take you farther than an EV can go between charges, you’ll need lớn be sure you have easy access lớn chargers in your community. Not all of us do.
3. Towing and Hauling
Electric pickups could be the most prominent automotive story of 2022, but towing a heavy load can cut their range in half. What’s more, many of the places Americans tow things lớn are not EV-friendly. Hooking up a boat trailer lớn an electric truck won’t make sense until there’s a charger near most places you’d want lớn tow a boat.
4. Cost
EVs can cost thousands of dollars more than comparable gas-powered cars. For example, the gas-powered 2022 Hyundai Kona starts at $21,150. A 2022 Kona EV? $34,000.
Government incentives can help bring the cost down. Many EVs are eligible for a federal tax credit of up lớn $7,500. But the full credit applies only lớn the first 200,000 EVs a manufacturer sells. That means that some of the most popular models can’t claim it. The incentive is no longer available on Tesla EVs, for instance.
Some state and local governments offer incentives. For example, California incentives will shave another $7,000 off the cost of some EVs.
Finally, some electric utilities have rebate programs lớn help customers buy electric cars and install home charging stations.
EVs Will Improve with Time 
Waiting might also get you a better EV. Many first-generation EVs are converted gas-powered cars. That Hyundai Kona, for instance, is a compact SUV available as an internal-combustion-powered car, a hybrid, and an EV. Béo do that, Hyundai had lớn design the car around a gasoline engine, fuel tank, and transmission. They then shoehorned an electric drivetrain into the same space.
RELATED STORIES: How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last?
More recent EVs began design as EVs from the ground up. The Hyundai Ioniq 5, for example, is similar in size, price, and function lớn the Kona. But it packs as much interior space as many large SUVs into the footprint of a small one. It’s one of our Best New Cars for 2022, partially because of its wildly practical layout.
Hyundai engineers could do this because EV design packs almost all moving parts of a car’s drivetrain underneath a flat floor. There’s no transmission hump, creating more interior space. Under the hood is a second truck.
If second-generation EVs have advantages over first-generation models, what can we expect from third-generation models? New technologies like solid-state batteries that double a car’s range and faster charging could be a few years away. Even if you’d like lớn own an electric vehicle, waiting might get you a better one.
With new car prices likely lớn remain high throughout 2022, you can make an excellent argument for keeping your existing car running and buying later.
Related Stories:
Electric Cars, Hybrids, and Weather: What You Need lớn Know
6 Things lớn Know About Batteries in Used Electric Vehicles
Is Buying a Used Electric Vehicle a Good Idea?

#Buying #Electric #Car #Tips
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#Buying #Electric #Car #Tips

The auto industry is racing toward making more electric car models, and in a decade from now, odds point lớn drivers owning EVs. From Mini lớn Rolls Royce, many automakers pledge lineups made entirely of electric cars by 2030. General Motors, Porsche, and others plan lớn keep a few gasoline-powered models but sell mostly electric vehicles (EVs) by 2035.
But we don’t live in that future yet. All over the nation, commuters still pass far more gas stations than electric chargers each day. Range anxiety remains a real consideration for many drivers. And many of those who love lớn drive are still enthralled with the growl and burble of a big V8.
So, while odds look good you’ll eventually own an EV, should you buy one now? This guide will tell you everything you need lớn know before buying an electric car, including the basics, all about charging, and the benefits and drawbacks of purchasing one right now.

EV Basics
Are EVs Really Going lớn Replace Gasoline-Powered Cars
Don’t We Need lớn Build More Chargers?
Can I Charge Any EV from Any Plug
Benefits of Buying an EV Now
Drawbacks of Buying an EV Now
EV Basics

First, we’ll explain the basics and the different types of electric vehicles.
Electric Vehicles
Pure EVs use electricity instead of gasoline. Their owners recharge the batteries instead of refueling them. They emit far less pollution than gasoline-powered cars. They’re cheaper lớn drive. And they contain fewer moving parts, which will eventually mean they cost less lớn maintain (though not necessarily yet – more on that in a moment).
But recharging takes longer than refilling a gas tank, and gasoline is easier lớn find than charging stations. Every EV on the market today has enough range lớn get most people back and forth lớn work, but taking one on a road trip can require planning.
Just two years ago, fewer than ten electric vehicle models were for sale in the U.S. In 2022, there may be more than 100.
If you’re researching cars lớn buy, you may also encounter the term “electrified vehicle.” This term can refer lớn EVS and hybrids, which use electricity and gasoline.
RELATED STORIES: Electric Car FAQ: Your Questions Answered
Hybrid
Like the pioneering Toyota Prius, hybrid vehicles use both a gasoline engine and an electric motor or two. The hybrid’s engine and regenerative braking system charge the onboard battery, which in turn powers the electric motors. They use their electric motors at neighborhood speeds, but their gasoline engines take over once they get beyond about 30 mph. The combination of electric power and regenerative charging gives hybrids better gas mileage than pure gasoline-powered cars.
This guide will not cover hybrids.
Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV)
Like a conventional hybrid, PHEVs use both a gasoline engine and electric motors. But PHEVs have a secret weapon: They can connect lớn an external power source, either a home charger or public charging station, lớn charge their onboard batteries while at rest. These batteries are generally larger than the ones in regular hybrids, allowing PHEVs lớn travel at highway speeds under electric power alone. They’re usually capable of 20 lớn 30 miles using just battery power, and their gasoline engines kick in only once their batteries get nearly depleted. Since Americans drive less than 30 miles per day on average, owning a PHEV is like owning an EV most days. But PHEV owners can take long road trips relying only on gasoline.
In 2022, manufacturers will make PHEVs in most classes. Whether you’re looking for a rugged Jeep Wrangler or a cushy BMW 7-Series, you can find a PHEV in your preferred class. But this guide does not cover PHEVs.
RELATED STORIES: Types of Electric Vehicles: EV, BEV, HEV, PHEV
Are EVs Really Going lớn Replace Gasoline-Powered Cars?
Yes, eventually, if automakers stick lớn their plans. But it will take time. Car manufacturers faced many challenges in 2021. Between the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and a worldwide shortage of microchips, Americans bought fewer cars due lớn lack of supply and high demand. Americans bought about 15 million vehicles in 2021 after several years of sales over the 17 million mark. But even as overall car sales declined, electric car sales soared.
According lớn Autotrader parent company Cox Automotive, car sales fell 21% in the fourth quarter of 2021 compared lớn a year earlier. But EV sales soared, increasing by 72% in the same timeframe.
EVs remain less than 4% of the vehicles on American roads. Today, the average car in the United States is over 12 years old, so replacing most vehicles on the road will take many years.
Another trend that could accelerate EV sales quickly is electric trucks. Americans buy a lot of pickup trucks. The first electric trucks entered the market late in 2021. Rivian said it delivered 920 vehicles in 2021. The Ford F-150 Lightning — an electric version of America’s best-selling vehicle — will reach customer driveways this year. Chevrolet plans an electric Silverado pickup for 2024.
So, yes, EVs are set lớn take the place of most gasoline-powered vehicles. Most of the world’s largest automakers began betting most of their profits on it.
Don’t We Need lớn Build More Chargers?
America has upwards of 145,000 gas stations, according lớn The Association for Convenience and Fuel Retailing (NACS). Refueling a gas-powered car takes just a few minutes.
Recharging an electric car takes longer, though the time varies widely from car lớn car. Béo charge batteries as efficiently as we refill gas tanks, we’d need lớn build many more chargers.
Several companies are doing just that, building ever-expanding charging networks. However, one crucial difference makes this problem smaller than it seems.
Your Home Charger Matters Most
Almost none of us can refill a gasoline-powered car at home. But the vast majority of EV charging is done in the carport, garage, or driveway.
According lớn the U.S. Department of Energy, about 80% of EV charging happens at home. Having chargers out in the community is helpful, but most electric car owners still charge the car at home each night.
It’s possible lớn charge your EV from a standard household outlet, but it’s slow. Most homeowners who buy an EV buy a Màn chơi 2 fast charger (more on this in a moment). Dealerships can sell them and arrange installation.
Apartment dwellers generally can’t install their own chargers. But many apartment buildings have begun installing them, and those that haven’t yet likely will as EVs grow more common.
It’s also worth noting that charging infrastructure in many places is better than you’d think. The states with the most chargers per car include West Virginia, Wyoming, and Mississippi — defying expectations that EVs are a coastal phenomenon.
Can I Charge Any EV from Any Plug?
Types of Chargers
You can charge an EV from a standard household outlet. But you won’t want lớn.
Màn chơi 1 Charger
This charging standard uses a standard 120-volt home outlet and the EV’s onboard DC converter. Automakers and engineers call this a Màn chơi 1 charger, and it’s very slow. When automakers advertise how fast an EV can charge, they rarely refer lớn how long it takes with a Màn chơi 1 charger.
Màn chơi 2 Charger
Savvy EV buyers choose lớn have a Màn chơi 2 charger installed at home. These require a 240-volt electrical circuit, similar lớn an electric dryer. A professional electrician can install one in a couple of hours. They charge an electric car much faster than a Màn chơi 1 charger but still slower than the fastest advertised charging times. For most owners, that’s not a problem — we’re generally home for hours at a time (and now some people work from home regularly), so it’s easy lớn recharge the car’s battery entirely overnight.
Màn chơi 3 Charger
Some public chargers work even faster. So-called Màn chơi 3 chargers use direct current (DC). When automakers advertise charging speeds, they usually refer lớn how quickly an electric vehicle recharges using DC at a Màn chơi 3 charger.
RELATED STORIES: Do I Have lớn Pay lớn Charge My Electric Car?
Types of Plugs
There are three different types of plugs found on electric cars in the U.S. Using a public charger requires finding the correct plug, but that’s not difficult.
CCS Plugs
Most European- and American-made EVs use a plug design called CCS, or Combined Charging System. This plug connects pure electric (or plug-in hybrids) lớn a DC rapid charger. Almost all new EVs boast a CCS socket.
CHAdeMO
Japanese-built EVs use a plug design called CHAdeMO, which uses a direct current charging protocol. Most public charging stations can accommodate both CHAdeMo and CCS plugs. According lớn Inside EVs, CHAdeMO will phase out in 2022. Quoting Electrify America, the report says, “In recent years, the automotive industry has converged on CCS as the non-proprietary standard of choice for vehicles in the U.S.”
Tesla Chargers
Tesla cars use a proprietary plug and charger network. The company currently operates the most extensive public charging network in America. Tesla cars come with an adapter that lets Tesla owners charge from other charging networks.
At the moment, non-Tesla cars can’t recharge from Tesla Superchargers. Tesla has announced plans lớn open its network lớn other brands but hasn’t yet set a date.
Adapters
You can charge your electric car at Tesla Destination Charging stations offering Màn chơi 2 charging capabilities with an adapter. EV owners of non-Tesla cars can purchase adapters for as little as $70 and work with Tesla connectors at the Destination Charging stations.
Benefits of Buying an EV Now
Some benefits might make an EV worth a look for you. Among them:
1. Cost of Fuel 
Electricity costs less than petroleum. Because prices of both fluctuate, it’s hard lớn pin down precisely how much money you’ll save using electricity instead of internal combustion lớn get back and forth lớn work and run errands around town. But most drivers can save about three-quarters of their annual fuel budget by switching lớn an EV. Still, car buyers are wise not lớn focus on fuel charges alone.
2. Environmental Benefits
According lớn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, transportation emits more carbon than any other economic sector. A century of burning gasoline has damaged the environment, and we can’t slow the impact of climate change without reducing our dependence on the stuff.
EVs aren’t purely good for the environment. Electric cars take a lot of carbon lớn produce. Processing the minerals used in their batteries is also carbon-intensive. But driving an EV produces less carbon waste than driving a gasoline-powered car. Sometimes it’s much less, depending on the source of the electricity used lớn charge it.
Studies have shown that buying a new EV becomes better for the environment than buying a new gasoline-powered car after about five years of ownership.
3. Maintenance and Repair Costs 
EVs operate with fewer moving parts than gasoline-powered cars. Fewer parts mean fewer things that can break and need replacing.
Studies have shown that EVs spend significantly less time in the cửa hàng than gasoline-powered cars. However, when EVs do need repairs, those repairs can be expensive. That’s a function of labor, not parts. Shops and dealerships train few mechanics in EV repair, so labor from a qualified mechanic costs more. These costs should come down as more Americans drive EVs and more repair shops invest in the training needed lớn repair them.
The single most expensive component of an EV is its battery. The federal government has your back here. Federal law requires that all EV manufacturers provide a battery warranty for at least eight years or 100,000 miles.
Reading the fine print is worth your time. These warranties differ from manufacturer lớn manufacturer. Some, including Tesla and GM, will replace a battery falling below 50% lớn 60% of its capacity. Others only cover total failure. Not all warranties transfer lớn a new owner with a used electric car.
A complete battery replacement is wildly expensive — as high as $20,000 for the largest batteries. But that cost is coming down quickly as manufacturers build more EVs. A recent Bloomberg study found that EV batteries cost $1,200 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in 2010 and $132 per kWh in 2021. That curve will keep dropping as EV manufacturing grows. Battery replacement will likely be much cheaper in a few years.
4. They’re Fun lớn Drive
Simply put, EVs are a blast lớn drive.
Gasoline engines build up their power gradually. Even the fastest gas-powered cars take a few seconds lớn get up lớn full power once you step on the gas.
Electric motors make 100% of their torque available instantly. That means electric cars accelerate faster off the line than their gasoline-powered counterparts.
The Tesla Model S Plaid gets from 0 lớn 60 mph in under two seconds — something no gas-powered car outside of Formula 1 racing has ever been able lớn do. But you don’t have lớn spend six figures lớn get extreme performance out of an EV. The 2022 Kia EV6 starts at about $40,000 and in GT-Line trim makes up lớn 320 horsepower and 446 lb-ft of torque, good enough for a 4.5-second run from 0 lớn 60 mph.
Drawbacks of Buying an EV Now
As much fun as they are lớn drive, EVs may not be the correct answer for many car shoppers. Some reasons you might want lớn look elsewhere:
1. Range
According lớn the U.S. Department of Transportation, the average American drives fewer than 30 miles per day. But you may not be the average driver.
The shortest range EV on the market (the Mazda MX-30) gets about 100 miles on a single charge. Some Americans drive more than that in a day. Others might live far from charging infrastructure and worry they won’t be able lớn recharge easily far from home.
EVs may not always merit range anxiety. Many manufacturers offset it by offering không tính tiền rentals of gas-powered cars lớn EV owners. For example, the Mazda MX-30 comes with up lớn 10 days per year of complimentary rentals of the manufacturer’s gas-powered vehicles.
But if road trips are a regular part of your life, or you drive all day for work, EV technology isn’t ready for you yet.
2. Charging Infrastructure
Home charging is the norm for most EV owners. But, if your everyday driving needs would take you farther than an EV can go between charges, you’ll need lớn be sure you have easy access lớn chargers in your community. Not all of us do.
3. Towing and Hauling
Electric pickups could be the most prominent automotive story of 2022, but towing a heavy load can cut their range in half. What’s more, many of the places Americans tow things lớn are not EV-friendly. Hooking up a boat trailer lớn an electric truck won’t make sense until there’s a charger near most places you’d want lớn tow a boat.
4. Cost
EVs can cost thousands of dollars more than comparable gas-powered cars. For example, the gas-powered 2022 Hyundai Kona starts at $21,150. A 2022 Kona EV? $34,000.
Government incentives can help bring the cost down. Many EVs are eligible for a federal tax credit of up lớn $7,500. But the full credit applies only lớn the first 200,000 EVs a manufacturer sells. That means that some of the most popular models can’t claim it. The incentive is no longer available on Tesla EVs, for instance.
Some state and local governments offer incentives. For example, California incentives will shave another $7,000 off the cost of some EVs.
Finally, some electric utilities have rebate programs lớn help customers buy electric cars and install home charging stations.
EVs Will Improve with Time 
Waiting might also get you a better EV. Many first-generation EVs are converted gas-powered cars. That Hyundai Kona, for instance, is a compact SUV available as an internal-combustion-powered car, a hybrid, and an EV. Béo do that, Hyundai had lớn design the car around a gasoline engine, fuel tank, and transmission. They then shoehorned an electric drivetrain into the same space.
RELATED STORIES: How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last?
More recent EVs began design as EVs from the ground up. The Hyundai Ioniq 5, for example, is similar in size, price, and function lớn the Kona. But it packs as much interior space as many large SUVs into the footprint of a small one. It’s one of our Best New Cars for 2022, partially because of its wildly practical layout.
Hyundai engineers could do this because EV design packs almost all moving parts of a car’s drivetrain underneath a flat floor. There’s no transmission hump, creating more interior space. Under the hood is a second truck.
If second-generation EVs have advantages over first-generation models, what can we expect from third-generation models? New technologies like solid-state batteries that double a car’s range and faster charging could be a few years away. Even if you’d like lớn own an electric vehicle, waiting might get you a better one.
With new car prices likely lớn remain high throughout 2022, you can make an excellent argument for keeping your existing car running and buying later.
Related Stories:
Electric Cars, Hybrids, and Weather: What You Need lớn Know
6 Things lớn Know About Batteries in Used Electric Vehicles
Is Buying a Used Electric Vehicle a Good Idea?

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