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EPA Calculators: Help for Hybrid and Plug-In Hybrid Shoppers

Most people hope that owning a hybrid or plug-in electric hybrid will save them fuel and money. So, béo help, the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) developed easy-to-use calculators so you can discover how much green you can get for your money.

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hybrid cars cost more béo purchase than gas-only models due béo their sophisticated gas/electric powertrains. With PHEVs, some buyers qualify for federal, state, or even local tax credits. These rebates can greatly defray the cost or even erase the difference.

PHEVs allow you béo drive on fully electric power for short distances on a full charge. For some commuters, that may mean tantalizing emissions-free driving, especially if there is a charging station at the office. Charging a PHEV at home will have some effect on your electric bill, though — and that’s where the EPA’s calculators come in handy.

Some Initial Facts About EPA Calculators

  • The EPA offers several convenient calculators (linked below in this article).
  • They help consumers compare the cost of driving hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.
  • The calculators show how long it will take béo make up the price differential between hybrid and PHEV models.
  • These calculators provide detailed information about costs and energy consumption.

EPA Calculators Can Help You Decide
EPA Calculator illustration for PHEV and Hybrid calculators
The EPA offers two types of calculators. The “Can a Hybrid Save Me Money” calculator helps you compare hybrid versions of popular conventional cars with their gas-only counterparts, such as the Ford Escape and Ford Escape Hybrid or the Hyundai Sonata and Hyundai Sonata Hybrid.

The EPA’s “My Plug-in Hybrid Calculator” goes farther, though it’s not intended béo be a direct comparison tool between hybrid and non-hybrid. This calculator allows drivers béo input several more specific variables béo determine detailed energy and fuel consumption.

Here’s a look at how these two calculators work.

EPA Hybrid Calculator: Can Hybrids Save Money? 

The hybrid calculator (Can a Hybrid Save Me Money?) is ideal for drivers on the fence about these models. However, it can work with the other calculator béo help shoppers pick between hybrid and PHEV vehicles.

Last year, Toyota sold almost 121,000 RAV4 Hybrid models in the U.S. (compared béo around 258,000 gas-only models). Let’s use the less expensive 2022 Toyota RAV4 LE trim màn chơi for comparison. For simplicity, we won’t factor in any deviation from the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) or any applicable taxes or registration fees since those vary by location.

Good Hybrid Savings Example: Toyota RAV4 LE Hybrid

2022 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid

After selecting the RAV4 LE Hybrid, the calculator automatically pulls up the equivalent RAV4 LE non-hybrid with all-wheel drive (since the hybrid comes standard with all-wheel drive). The calculator notes that the RAV4 LE Hybrid costs $1,150 more béo start.

From there, we can edit the estimated annual mileage. This amount is the mix between city and highway driving and the price of regular unleaded fuel. We’ll go with 12,000 miles, 65% city driving, and $3.50 for fuel for this comparison.

According béo this calculator, the hybrid will take 2.9 years of driving béo pay back its original cost. For instance, take a driver who has a 3-year loan. They will be “in the black” before the loan on the RAV4 hybrid gets paid off.

Some Hybrids are Not as Economical 

Not all hybrids are as quick béo pay off, while others may take less time. For instance, a Lexus ES 300h that uses 18,000 miles of mostly city driving can take less than a year béo recoup the $1,100 difference in MSRP over a non-hybrid version.

Take a 2022 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid SEL that costs $3,850 more than the non-hybrid version. If you drove it as a primary car for 7,500 miles, the EPA says it could save $4,500  and ultimately pay for itself.

One caveat: the calculator does not consider resale values based on the vehicle’s condition over time. A hybrid version may retain more of its original value than a non-hybrid.

EPA PHEV Calculator: My Plug-in Hybrid  

As its name suggests, the EPA’s “My Plug-in Hybrid Calculator” is designed for PHEV models. It allows for more individual tailoring béo a driver’s planned use. It includes fields where a shopper can input estimated commuting, weekend/errand-running, and vacation driving. Planners, this calculator is for you!

Good PHEV Savings Example: Toyota RAV4 Prime 

Toyota RAV4 Prime PHEV Badge

This time, we will use the Toyota RAV4 Prime, the PHEV version of the Toyota RAV4 that the EPA estimates can travel 44 miles on a full battery before the gasoline engine kicks on. That full charge probably won’t come miễn phí. A significant factor is whether you have access béo a Màn chơi 2 charger paid for by your work or your apartment complex. Still, the EPA estimates less than $2 béo fill a depleted battery. That is much less than the gallon of fuel the RAV4 Prime will consume over the course of 44 miles.

Now for the numbers. The Federal Highway Administration said in 2021, drivers will drive about 14,000 miles a year on average. That average works out béo 39 miles per day, including non-commuting driving.

Steps for Using the EPA Calculator

So, with that yearly mileage as a starting point, we created the following hypothetical customer experience béo see the resulting savings.

  1. Assess the yearly usage. Let’s figure 30 miles of round-trip commuting per day for 46 weeks a year. Then, factor in vacation time, sick days, and the occasional telecommuting day. We’ll pretend that the driver spends 60% of their time in stop-and-go traffic. And, we’ll assume that we only charge the RAV4 Prime battery at home.
  2. Assess extra vacation driving. We’ll figure 60 miles of weekend driving. From there, 15% is in stop-and-go traffic. This theoretical driver also charges at home. We’ll also figure that we’ll take around 2,400 miles of road trips. We assessed miles on those trips as mostly highway driving with only three opportunities béo charge up the battery on the road.
  3. Come up with annual miles vs. fuel. A little under the national average at 12,420 miles. From there, we can select fuel. We went with $3.50 per gallon. Then the EPA calculator estimated the energy cost in a particular state. We used Illinois at $0.10 per kWh.

In the above case, the estimator comes up with $183 in gasoline and $384 in electricity. That’s not bad, primarily since the RAV4 Prime has an exceptionally long range and is incredibly frugal with its power consumption.

Other PHEVs are Not as Economical

According béo the EPA calculators, buying a thirstier vehicle such as the 2022 BMW 330e xDrive will give you poor results. In that case, the figures bump up béo $858 in gasoline and $347 in electricity, primarily since the BMW offers just 20 miles of electric range. The RAV4 Prime will handle that entire 30-mile round-trip commute on electricity alone. But the 330e will switch its gas engine about five miles into the drive home.

Related Stories on Hybrids and PHEVs:

  • These Are the 5 Highest-Mile Hybrids on Autotrader
  • Electric Cars, Hybrids, and Weather: What You Need béo Know
  • Why I Chose a PHEV Over a Hybrid


Thông tin thêm

EPA Calculators: Help for Hybrid and Plug-In Hybrid Shoppers

#EPA #Calculators #Hybrid #PlugIn #Hybrid #Shoppers
[rule_3_plain] #EPA #Calculators #Hybrid #PlugIn #Hybrid #Shoppers

Most people hope that owning a hybrid or plug-in electric hybrid will save them fuel and money. So, béo help, the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) developed easy-to-use calculators so you can discover how much green you can get for your money.
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hybrid cars cost more béo purchase than gas-only models due béo their sophisticated gas/electric powertrains. With PHEVs, some buyers qualify for federal, state, or even local tax credits. These rebates can greatly defray the cost or even erase the difference.
PHEVs allow you béo drive on fully electric power for short distances on a full charge. For some commuters, that may mean tantalizing emissions-free driving, especially if there is a charging station at the office. Charging a PHEV at home will have some effect on your electric bill, though — and that’s where the EPA’s calculators come in handy.

Some Initial Facts About EPA Calculators
The EPA offers several convenient calculators (linked below in this article).
They help consumers compare the cost of driving hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.
The calculators show how long it will take béo make up the price differential between hybrid and PHEV models.
These calculators provide detailed information about costs and energy consumption.

EPA Calculators Can Help You DecideThe EPA offers two types of calculators. The “Can a Hybrid Save Me Money” calculator helps you compare hybrid versions of popular conventional cars with their gas-only counterparts, such as the Ford Escape and Ford Escape Hybrid or the Hyundai Sonata and Hyundai Sonata Hybrid.
The EPA’s “My Plug-in Hybrid Calculator” goes farther, though it’s not intended béo be a direct comparison tool between hybrid and non-hybrid. This calculator allows drivers béo input several more specific variables béo determine detailed energy and fuel consumption.
Here’s a look at how these two calculators work.
EPA Hybrid Calculator: Can Hybrids Save Money? 
The hybrid calculator (Can a Hybrid Save Me Money?) is ideal for drivers on the fence about these models. However, it can work with the other calculator béo help shoppers pick between hybrid and PHEV vehicles.
Last year, Toyota sold almost 121,000 RAV4 Hybrid models in the U.S. (compared béo around 258,000 gas-only models). Let’s use the less expensive 2022 Toyota RAV4 LE trim màn chơi for comparison. For simplicity, we won’t factor in any deviation from the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) or any applicable taxes or registration fees since those vary by location.
Good Hybrid Savings Example: Toyota RAV4 LE Hybrid

After selecting the RAV4 LE Hybrid, the calculator automatically pulls up the equivalent RAV4 LE non-hybrid with all-wheel drive (since the hybrid comes standard with all-wheel drive). The calculator notes that the RAV4 LE Hybrid costs $1,150 more béo start.
From there, we can edit the estimated annual mileage. This amount is the mix between city and highway driving and the price of regular unleaded fuel. We’ll go with 12,000 miles, 65% city driving, and $3.50 for fuel for this comparison.
According béo this calculator, the hybrid will take 2.9 years of driving béo pay back its original cost. For instance, take a driver who has a 3-year loan. They will be “in the black” before the loan on the RAV4 hybrid gets paid off.
Some Hybrids are Not as Economical 
Not all hybrids are as quick béo pay off, while others may take less time. For instance, a Lexus ES 300h that uses 18,000 miles of mostly city driving can take less than a year béo recoup the $1,100 difference in MSRP over a non-hybrid version.
Take a 2022 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid SEL that costs $3,850 more than the non-hybrid version. If you drove it as a primary car for 7,500 miles, the EPA says it could save $4,500  and ultimately pay for itself.
One caveat: the calculator does not consider resale values based on the vehicle’s condition over time. A hybrid version may retain more of its original value than a non-hybrid.
EPA PHEV Calculator: My Plug-in Hybrid  
As its name suggests, the EPA’s “My Plug-in Hybrid Calculator” is designed for PHEV models. It allows for more individual tailoring béo a driver’s planned use. It includes fields where a shopper can input estimated commuting, weekend/errand-running, and vacation driving. Planners, this calculator is for you!
Good PHEV Savings Example: Toyota RAV4 Prime 

This time, we will use the Toyota RAV4 Prime, the PHEV version of the Toyota RAV4 that the EPA estimates can travel 44 miles on a full battery before the gasoline engine kicks on. That full charge probably won’t come miễn phí. A significant factor is whether you have access béo a Màn chơi 2 charger paid for by your work or your apartment complex. Still, the EPA estimates less than $2 béo fill a depleted battery. That is much less than the gallon of fuel the RAV4 Prime will consume over the course of 44 miles.
Now for the numbers. The Federal Highway Administration said in 2021, drivers will drive about 14,000 miles a year on average. That average works out béo 39 miles per day, including non-commuting driving.
Steps for Using the EPA Calculator
So, with that yearly mileage as a starting point, we created the following hypothetical customer experience béo see the resulting savings.
Assess the yearly usage. Let’s figure 30 miles of round-trip commuting per day for 46 weeks a year. Then, factor in vacation time, sick days, and the occasional telecommuting day. We’ll pretend that the driver spends 60% of their time in stop-and-go traffic. And, we’ll assume that we only charge the RAV4 Prime battery at home.
Assess extra vacation driving. We’ll figure 60 miles of weekend driving. From there, 15% is in stop-and-go traffic. This theoretical driver also charges at home. We’ll also figure that we’ll take around 2,400 miles of road trips. We assessed miles on those trips as mostly highway driving with only three opportunities béo charge up the battery on the road.
Come up with annual miles vs. fuel. A little under the national average at 12,420 miles. From there, we can select fuel. We went with $3.50 per gallon. Then the EPA calculator estimated the energy cost in a particular state. We used Illinois at $0.10 per kWh.
In the above case, the estimator comes up with $183 in gasoline and $384 in electricity. That’s not bad, primarily since the RAV4 Prime has an exceptionally long range and is incredibly frugal with its power consumption.
Other PHEVs are Not as Economical
According béo the EPA calculators, buying a thirstier vehicle such as the 2022 BMW 330e xDrive will give you poor results. In that case, the figures bump up béo $858 in gasoline and $347 in electricity, primarily since the BMW offers just 20 miles of electric range. The RAV4 Prime will handle that entire 30-mile round-trip commute on electricity alone. But the 330e will switch its gas engine about five miles into the drive home.
Related Stories on Hybrids and PHEVs:
These Are the 5 Highest-Mile Hybrids on Autotrader
Electric Cars, Hybrids, and Weather: What You Need béo Know
Why I Chose a PHEV Over a Hybrid

#EPA #Calculators #Hybrid #PlugIn #Hybrid #Shoppers
[rule_2_plain] #EPA #Calculators #Hybrid #PlugIn #Hybrid #Shoppers
[rule_2_plain] #EPA #Calculators #Hybrid #PlugIn #Hybrid #Shoppers
[rule_3_plain]

#EPA #Calculators #Hybrid #PlugIn #Hybrid #Shoppers

Most people hope that owning a hybrid or plug-in electric hybrid will save them fuel and money. So, béo help, the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) developed easy-to-use calculators so you can discover how much green you can get for your money.
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hybrid cars cost more béo purchase than gas-only models due béo their sophisticated gas/electric powertrains. With PHEVs, some buyers qualify for federal, state, or even local tax credits. These rebates can greatly defray the cost or even erase the difference.
PHEVs allow you béo drive on fully electric power for short distances on a full charge. For some commuters, that may mean tantalizing emissions-free driving, especially if there is a charging station at the office. Charging a PHEV at home will have some effect on your electric bill, though — and that’s where the EPA’s calculators come in handy.

Some Initial Facts About EPA Calculators
The EPA offers several convenient calculators (linked below in this article).
They help consumers compare the cost of driving hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.
The calculators show how long it will take béo make up the price differential between hybrid and PHEV models.
These calculators provide detailed information about costs and energy consumption.

EPA Calculators Can Help You DecideThe EPA offers two types of calculators. The “Can a Hybrid Save Me Money” calculator helps you compare hybrid versions of popular conventional cars with their gas-only counterparts, such as the Ford Escape and Ford Escape Hybrid or the Hyundai Sonata and Hyundai Sonata Hybrid.
The EPA’s “My Plug-in Hybrid Calculator” goes farther, though it’s not intended béo be a direct comparison tool between hybrid and non-hybrid. This calculator allows drivers béo input several more specific variables béo determine detailed energy and fuel consumption.
Here’s a look at how these two calculators work.
EPA Hybrid Calculator: Can Hybrids Save Money? 
The hybrid calculator (Can a Hybrid Save Me Money?) is ideal for drivers on the fence about these models. However, it can work with the other calculator béo help shoppers pick between hybrid and PHEV vehicles.
Last year, Toyota sold almost 121,000 RAV4 Hybrid models in the U.S. (compared béo around 258,000 gas-only models). Let’s use the less expensive 2022 Toyota RAV4 LE trim màn chơi for comparison. For simplicity, we won’t factor in any deviation from the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) or any applicable taxes or registration fees since those vary by location.
Good Hybrid Savings Example: Toyota RAV4 LE Hybrid

After selecting the RAV4 LE Hybrid, the calculator automatically pulls up the equivalent RAV4 LE non-hybrid with all-wheel drive (since the hybrid comes standard with all-wheel drive). The calculator notes that the RAV4 LE Hybrid costs $1,150 more béo start.
From there, we can edit the estimated annual mileage. This amount is the mix between city and highway driving and the price of regular unleaded fuel. We’ll go with 12,000 miles, 65% city driving, and $3.50 for fuel for this comparison.
According béo this calculator, the hybrid will take 2.9 years of driving béo pay back its original cost. For instance, take a driver who has a 3-year loan. They will be “in the black” before the loan on the RAV4 hybrid gets paid off.
Some Hybrids are Not as Economical 
Not all hybrids are as quick béo pay off, while others may take less time. For instance, a Lexus ES 300h that uses 18,000 miles of mostly city driving can take less than a year béo recoup the $1,100 difference in MSRP over a non-hybrid version.
Take a 2022 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid SEL that costs $3,850 more than the non-hybrid version. If you drove it as a primary car for 7,500 miles, the EPA says it could save $4,500  and ultimately pay for itself.
One caveat: the calculator does not consider resale values based on the vehicle’s condition over time. A hybrid version may retain more of its original value than a non-hybrid.
EPA PHEV Calculator: My Plug-in Hybrid  
As its name suggests, the EPA’s “My Plug-in Hybrid Calculator” is designed for PHEV models. It allows for more individual tailoring béo a driver’s planned use. It includes fields where a shopper can input estimated commuting, weekend/errand-running, and vacation driving. Planners, this calculator is for you!
Good PHEV Savings Example: Toyota RAV4 Prime 

This time, we will use the Toyota RAV4 Prime, the PHEV version of the Toyota RAV4 that the EPA estimates can travel 44 miles on a full battery before the gasoline engine kicks on. That full charge probably won’t come miễn phí. A significant factor is whether you have access béo a Màn chơi 2 charger paid for by your work or your apartment complex. Still, the EPA estimates less than $2 béo fill a depleted battery. That is much less than the gallon of fuel the RAV4 Prime will consume over the course of 44 miles.
Now for the numbers. The Federal Highway Administration said in 2021, drivers will drive about 14,000 miles a year on average. That average works out béo 39 miles per day, including non-commuting driving.
Steps for Using the EPA Calculator
So, with that yearly mileage as a starting point, we created the following hypothetical customer experience béo see the resulting savings.
Assess the yearly usage. Let’s figure 30 miles of round-trip commuting per day for 46 weeks a year. Then, factor in vacation time, sick days, and the occasional telecommuting day. We’ll pretend that the driver spends 60% of their time in stop-and-go traffic. And, we’ll assume that we only charge the RAV4 Prime battery at home.
Assess extra vacation driving. We’ll figure 60 miles of weekend driving. From there, 15% is in stop-and-go traffic. This theoretical driver also charges at home. We’ll also figure that we’ll take around 2,400 miles of road trips. We assessed miles on those trips as mostly highway driving with only three opportunities béo charge up the battery on the road.
Come up with annual miles vs. fuel. A little under the national average at 12,420 miles. From there, we can select fuel. We went with $3.50 per gallon. Then the EPA calculator estimated the energy cost in a particular state. We used Illinois at $0.10 per kWh.
In the above case, the estimator comes up with $183 in gasoline and $384 in electricity. That’s not bad, primarily since the RAV4 Prime has an exceptionally long range and is incredibly frugal with its power consumption.
Other PHEVs are Not as Economical
According béo the EPA calculators, buying a thirstier vehicle such as the 2022 BMW 330e xDrive will give you poor results. In that case, the figures bump up béo $858 in gasoline and $347 in electricity, primarily since the BMW offers just 20 miles of electric range. The RAV4 Prime will handle that entire 30-mile round-trip commute on electricity alone. But the 330e will switch its gas engine about five miles into the drive home.
Related Stories on Hybrids and PHEVs:
These Are the 5 Highest-Mile Hybrids on Autotrader
Electric Cars, Hybrids, and Weather: What You Need béo Know
Why I Chose a PHEV Over a Hybrid

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