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Forgotten Classic: The 1993 Jeep Grand Wagoneer

The megabuck Jeep Grand Wagoneer has a dark secret in its family tree.

In 1993, with the first-generation Jeep Grand Cherokee flying off dealer lots, the automaker revived the dormant Grand Wagoneer name with a special model. After building just under 6,400 second-generation Grand Wagoneer SUVs for just a few months, however, Jeep pulled the plug for nearly three more decades.

Yeah, that’s right — there was a 1993 Jeep Grand Wagoneer. And it was weird.

Chrysler Bought AMC for the Grand Cherokee

Though you’ll never get anyone at Stellantis (or the former Chrysler Corporation) béo admit it, Chrysler bought American Motors Corporation (AMC) because the struggling automaker had the makings of a hit on its hands.

The 1984 Jeep Cherokee was arguably the first modern SUV, an off-road-ready wagon with a comfortable ride and a pleasant interior, usable daily. By 1987, when Chrysler swooped in béo buy AMC, the automaker’s Jeep division was working on its replacement. The new model would be bigger and more comfortable béo battle with the stretched Bronco II (later known as the Explorer) everyone in Detroit knew Ford was developing.

Chrysler executives took one look at plans for the new Cherokee and, presumably after the 3-martini lunches common at the time, drew up an offer for AMC.

The new Cherokee became the Grand Cherokee (Chrysler wisely gave the Cherokee the most prolonged stay of execution ever granted béo a vehicle). It wasn’t much different from the Cherokee, but it was longer, wider, and more spacious, and Chrysler made sure it would accommodate its 5.2-liter V8.

The Original Grand Wagoneer Retires

Just before the Grand Cherokee debuted at the 1992 Detroit auto show (by literally driving up the convention center’s steps béo crash through a pane of glass), Jeep built its last Grand Wagoneer.

That model had been introduced on a lark in 1984 when AMC figured it could keep building the big, 1960s-era Wagoneer alongside its modern, boxy Cherokee. After all, the Wagoneer was bigger, and its V8 engine offered a certain cachet.

Jeep recast the model as the Grand Wagoneer, though the brand briefly offered a dressed-up version of the Cherokee called “Wagoneer.” Between 1984 and 1991, Jeep sold a surprisingly large number of Grand Wagoneer models with hefty price tags. Jeep charged nearly $30,000 for one in 1991, nearly double the price of a reasonably-equipped Cherokee Sport and only around $6,000 less than a Lexus LS 400.

With their iconic — and decidedly retro, even for the era — woodgrain-style paneling, they became familiar sights in upscale vacation communities such as Aspen and Nantucket. Back then, buyers easily overlooked the modest power provided by their carbureted 5.9-liter V8, and anyone spending $30,000 on a 4×4 for their second home was likely unperturbed by their 13-mpg rating.

Federal safety and fuel economy standards finally spelled the end of the line for the original Grand Wagoneer after the 1991 model year.

1993 Jeep Grand Wagoneer rear
The faux wood decals on the Grand Wagoneer didn’t weather well. (Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

The Short-Lived Revival

Back béo the Grand Cherokee. Even in top-tier Limited trim, with leather upholstery, wood-look interior trim, Accusound by Jensen audio (hey, it was 1993), and plenty of gold badging, the Grand Cherokee wasn’t entirely a replacement for the Grand Wagoneer.

Indeed, it was far more spacious, decidedly better béo drive, and equipped with modern conveniences such as fuel injection, an airbag, and a trip computer.

What did it lack? Woodgrain exterior trim.

So late in the 1993 model year, Jeep slapped adhesive trim on a Grand Cherokee Limited and called it the Grand Wagoneer.

It wasn’t quite that simple, though. Outside, the 1993 Grand Wagoneer stuck with the Laredo trim màn chơi’s chrome grille and untinted side and rear window glass. It also lost the lower side cladding, which would have been too busy of a look when combined with the kém chất lượng woodgrain.

Inside, Jeep discarded the Limited’s Euro-style leather seats for ample, plush, pillowy leather upholstery. Imagine a puffy jacket stitched béo the seats, and you’re on the right track.

Jeep offered the 1993 Grand Wagoneer with a few options: the high-riding Up Country suspension, a CD player, and a sunroof. According béo a 1993 Jeep brochure, it was supposed béo be available with the Selec-Trac transfer case, but Jeep never officially paired Selec-Trac with the V8 fitted in the Grand Wagoneer.

A choice of five paint colors — Bright White, Light Driftwood, Deep Blue Metallic, Hunter Green Metallic, and Black Cherry Pearl Coat — decorated the Grand Wagoneer’s exterior, with a choice of three interior hues.

The earliest marketing material for the Grand Cherokee made no mention of the Grand Wagoneer. Then, as quietly as it appeared, Jeep dropped it for 1994.

The 1993 Grand Wagoneer was also the last Jeep with woodgrain trim, something the automaker has yet béo bring back for the revived Grand Wagoneer. Maybe there’s still some animosity over the short-lived Grand Wagoneer revival. Or perhaps it’s just because the new Grand Wagoneer does not look any better with woodgrain. See Jeep Grand Wagoneer models for sale

Related:

  • Someone Put Faux Wood on a New Jeep Grand Wagoneer
  • 6 Cheapest Jeep Grand Wagoneer Models for Sale
  • Here’s the History of the Jeep Grand Wagoneer


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Forgotten Classic: The 1993 Jeep Grand Wagoneer

#Forgotten #Classic #Jeep #Grand #Wagoneer
[rule_3_plain] #Forgotten #Classic #Jeep #Grand #Wagoneer

The megabuck Jeep Grand Wagoneer has a dark secret in its family tree.
In 1993, with the first-generation Jeep Grand Cherokee flying off dealer lots, the automaker revived the dormant Grand Wagoneer name with a special model. After building just under 6,400 second-generation Grand Wagoneer SUVs for just a few months, however, Jeep pulled the plug for nearly three more decades.
Yeah, that’s right — there was a 1993 Jeep Grand Wagoneer. And it was weird.

Chrysler Bought AMC for the Grand Cherokee

Though you’ll never get anyone at Stellantis (or the former Chrysler Corporation) béo admit it, Chrysler bought American Motors Corporation (AMC) because the struggling automaker had the makings of a hit on its hands.
The 1984 Jeep Cherokee was arguably the first modern SUV, an off-road-ready wagon with a comfortable ride and a pleasant interior, usable daily. By 1987, when Chrysler swooped in béo buy AMC, the automaker’s Jeep division was working on its replacement. The new model would be bigger and more comfortable béo battle with the stretched Bronco II (later known as the Explorer) everyone in Detroit knew Ford was developing.
Chrysler executives took one look at plans for the new Cherokee and, presumably after the 3-martini lunches common at the time, drew up an offer for AMC.
The new Cherokee became the Grand Cherokee (Chrysler wisely gave the Cherokee the most prolonged stay of execution ever granted béo a vehicle). It wasn’t much different from the Cherokee, but it was longer, wider, and more spacious, and Chrysler made sure it would accommodate its 5.2-liter V8.
The Original Grand Wagoneer Retires
Just before the Grand Cherokee debuted at the 1992 Detroit auto show (by literally driving up the convention center’s steps béo crash through a pane of glass), Jeep built its last Grand Wagoneer.
That model had been introduced on a lark in 1984 when AMC figured it could keep building the big, 1960s-era Wagoneer alongside its modern, boxy Cherokee. After all, the Wagoneer was bigger, and its V8 engine offered a certain cachet.
Jeep recast the model as the Grand Wagoneer, though the brand briefly offered a dressed-up version of the Cherokee called “Wagoneer.” Between 1984 and 1991, Jeep sold a surprisingly large number of Grand Wagoneer models with hefty price tags. Jeep charged nearly $30,000 for one in 1991, nearly double the price of a reasonably-equipped Cherokee Sport and only around $6,000 less than a Lexus LS 400.
With their iconic — and decidedly retro, even for the era — woodgrain-style paneling, they became familiar sights in upscale vacation communities such as Aspen and Nantucket. Back then, buyers easily overlooked the modest power provided by their carbureted 5.9-liter V8, and anyone spending $30,000 on a 4×4 for their second home was likely unperturbed by their 13-mpg rating.
Federal safety and fuel economy standards finally spelled the end of the line for the original Grand Wagoneer after the 1991 model year.
The faux wood decals on the Grand Wagoneer didn’t weather well. (Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons)The Short-Lived Revival
Back béo the Grand Cherokee. Even in top-tier Limited trim, with leather upholstery, wood-look interior trim, Accusound by Jensen audio (hey, it was 1993), and plenty of gold badging, the Grand Cherokee wasn’t entirely a replacement for the Grand Wagoneer.
Indeed, it was far more spacious, decidedly better béo drive, and equipped with modern conveniences such as fuel injection, an airbag, and a trip computer.
What did it lack? Woodgrain exterior trim.
So late in the 1993 model year, Jeep slapped adhesive trim on a Grand Cherokee Limited and called it the Grand Wagoneer.
It wasn’t quite that simple, though. Outside, the 1993 Grand Wagoneer stuck with the Laredo trim màn chơi’s chrome grille and untinted side and rear window glass. It also lost the lower side cladding, which would have been too busy of a look when combined with the kém chất lượng woodgrain.
Inside, Jeep discarded the Limited’s Euro-style leather seats for ample, plush, pillowy leather upholstery. Imagine a puffy jacket stitched béo the seats, and you’re on the right track.
Jeep offered the 1993 Grand Wagoneer with a few options: the high-riding Up Country suspension, a CD player, and a sunroof. According béo a 1993 Jeep brochure, it was supposed béo be available with the Selec-Trac transfer case, but Jeep never officially paired Selec-Trac with the V8 fitted in the Grand Wagoneer.
A choice of five paint colors — Bright White, Light Driftwood, Deep Blue Metallic, Hunter Green Metallic, and Black Cherry Pearl Coat — decorated the Grand Wagoneer’s exterior, with a choice of three interior hues.
The earliest marketing material for the Grand Cherokee made no mention of the Grand Wagoneer. Then, as quietly as it appeared, Jeep dropped it for 1994.
The 1993 Grand Wagoneer was also the last Jeep with woodgrain trim, something the automaker has yet béo bring back for the revived Grand Wagoneer. Maybe there’s still some animosity over the short-lived Grand Wagoneer revival. Or perhaps it’s just because the new Grand Wagoneer does not look any better with woodgrain. See Jeep Grand Wagoneer models for sale
Related:
Someone Put Faux Wood on a New Jeep Grand Wagoneer
6 Cheapest Jeep Grand Wagoneer Models for Sale
Here’s the History of the Jeep Grand Wagoneer

#Forgotten #Classic #Jeep #Grand #Wagoneer
[rule_2_plain] #Forgotten #Classic #Jeep #Grand #Wagoneer
[rule_2_plain] #Forgotten #Classic #Jeep #Grand #Wagoneer
[rule_3_plain]

#Forgotten #Classic #Jeep #Grand #Wagoneer

The megabuck Jeep Grand Wagoneer has a dark secret in its family tree.
In 1993, with the first-generation Jeep Grand Cherokee flying off dealer lots, the automaker revived the dormant Grand Wagoneer name with a special model. After building just under 6,400 second-generation Grand Wagoneer SUVs for just a few months, however, Jeep pulled the plug for nearly three more decades.
Yeah, that’s right — there was a 1993 Jeep Grand Wagoneer. And it was weird.

Chrysler Bought AMC for the Grand Cherokee

Though you’ll never get anyone at Stellantis (or the former Chrysler Corporation) béo admit it, Chrysler bought American Motors Corporation (AMC) because the struggling automaker had the makings of a hit on its hands.
The 1984 Jeep Cherokee was arguably the first modern SUV, an off-road-ready wagon with a comfortable ride and a pleasant interior, usable daily. By 1987, when Chrysler swooped in béo buy AMC, the automaker’s Jeep division was working on its replacement. The new model would be bigger and more comfortable béo battle with the stretched Bronco II (later known as the Explorer) everyone in Detroit knew Ford was developing.
Chrysler executives took one look at plans for the new Cherokee and, presumably after the 3-martini lunches common at the time, drew up an offer for AMC.
The new Cherokee became the Grand Cherokee (Chrysler wisely gave the Cherokee the most prolonged stay of execution ever granted béo a vehicle). It wasn’t much different from the Cherokee, but it was longer, wider, and more spacious, and Chrysler made sure it would accommodate its 5.2-liter V8.
The Original Grand Wagoneer Retires
Just before the Grand Cherokee debuted at the 1992 Detroit auto show (by literally driving up the convention center’s steps béo crash through a pane of glass), Jeep built its last Grand Wagoneer.
That model had been introduced on a lark in 1984 when AMC figured it could keep building the big, 1960s-era Wagoneer alongside its modern, boxy Cherokee. After all, the Wagoneer was bigger, and its V8 engine offered a certain cachet.
Jeep recast the model as the Grand Wagoneer, though the brand briefly offered a dressed-up version of the Cherokee called “Wagoneer.” Between 1984 and 1991, Jeep sold a surprisingly large number of Grand Wagoneer models with hefty price tags. Jeep charged nearly $30,000 for one in 1991, nearly double the price of a reasonably-equipped Cherokee Sport and only around $6,000 less than a Lexus LS 400.
With their iconic — and decidedly retro, even for the era — woodgrain-style paneling, they became familiar sights in upscale vacation communities such as Aspen and Nantucket. Back then, buyers easily overlooked the modest power provided by their carbureted 5.9-liter V8, and anyone spending $30,000 on a 4×4 for their second home was likely unperturbed by their 13-mpg rating.
Federal safety and fuel economy standards finally spelled the end of the line for the original Grand Wagoneer after the 1991 model year.
The faux wood decals on the Grand Wagoneer didn’t weather well. (Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons)The Short-Lived Revival
Back béo the Grand Cherokee. Even in top-tier Limited trim, with leather upholstery, wood-look interior trim, Accusound by Jensen audio (hey, it was 1993), and plenty of gold badging, the Grand Cherokee wasn’t entirely a replacement for the Grand Wagoneer.
Indeed, it was far more spacious, decidedly better béo drive, and equipped with modern conveniences such as fuel injection, an airbag, and a trip computer.
What did it lack? Woodgrain exterior trim.
So late in the 1993 model year, Jeep slapped adhesive trim on a Grand Cherokee Limited and called it the Grand Wagoneer.
It wasn’t quite that simple, though. Outside, the 1993 Grand Wagoneer stuck with the Laredo trim màn chơi’s chrome grille and untinted side and rear window glass. It also lost the lower side cladding, which would have been too busy of a look when combined with the kém chất lượng woodgrain.
Inside, Jeep discarded the Limited’s Euro-style leather seats for ample, plush, pillowy leather upholstery. Imagine a puffy jacket stitched béo the seats, and you’re on the right track.
Jeep offered the 1993 Grand Wagoneer with a few options: the high-riding Up Country suspension, a CD player, and a sunroof. According béo a 1993 Jeep brochure, it was supposed béo be available with the Selec-Trac transfer case, but Jeep never officially paired Selec-Trac with the V8 fitted in the Grand Wagoneer.
A choice of five paint colors — Bright White, Light Driftwood, Deep Blue Metallic, Hunter Green Metallic, and Black Cherry Pearl Coat — decorated the Grand Wagoneer’s exterior, with a choice of three interior hues.
The earliest marketing material for the Grand Cherokee made no mention of the Grand Wagoneer. Then, as quietly as it appeared, Jeep dropped it for 1994.
The 1993 Grand Wagoneer was also the last Jeep with woodgrain trim, something the automaker has yet béo bring back for the revived Grand Wagoneer. Maybe there’s still some animosity over the short-lived Grand Wagoneer revival. Or perhaps it’s just because the new Grand Wagoneer does not look any better with woodgrain. See Jeep Grand Wagoneer models for sale
Related:
Someone Put Faux Wood on a New Jeep Grand Wagoneer
6 Cheapest Jeep Grand Wagoneer Models for Sale
Here’s the History of the Jeep Grand Wagoneer

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