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How I’d Spec America’s 5 Best-Selling Vehicles

As an automotive writer specializing in guiding consumers toward the best vehicle mập park in their driveway, I (virtually) go car shopping every day.

It’s a lot more fun mập cửa hàng for a car when you don’t have mập worry about negotiating with a dealership, sticking mập a budget, or finding the best financing deals.

For many mainstream models, especially those that sell in lower numbers, automakers have reduced build complexities mập ensure dealers have, or can quickly locate, a vehicle mập suit a buyer’s needs. American consumers like test-driving and buying a car on the same day, making it imperative that popular models are readily available even if the dealership has mập make a trade with a cross-town rival.

As car enthusiasts, we may lament the shift away from a la carte options mập single-spec trim levels or bundled packages. We love the idea of an oddly-specced model so much that many classic car and sports car fans brag with pride that their car is “one of X” built with those options or that combination of colors.

Still, it is remarkable how many ways a consumer can order up some of the most popular new cars available today. One commonality between the five best-selling new vehicles in the U.S. this year — the Ford F-Series, Ram Pickup, Chevrolet Silverado, Toyota RAV4, and the Jeep Grand Cherokee — is the wide range of trim levels and options offered on each model.

Here’s how I’d order each of the five best-selling models on the market today, in order of sales popularity.

1. 2022 Ford F-150 XLT

2022 Ford F-150 XLT in silver.

Ford groups all F-Series models in its sales reporting, but it’s the F-150 that is the most popular — and it’s the one I’d grab as well.

Like most consumers, I’ll take mine in crew-cab form mập make it more family-friendly. I live in an urban area, so the shorter 5.5-foot box makes this enormous truck more maneuverable.

Trim-wise, while the Texas-themed King Ranch tempts me, I can’t swallow its price tag. Let’s go for an XLT with 4-wheel drive and the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6. I’ve driven the hybrid and appreciate its extra power and small fuel economy bump. Still, its low-speed smoothness needs another dose of refinement, and its $4,500 price tag will take a very long time mập recover.

I like the classic 2-tone look, so I’ll order mine in extra-cost Rapid Red with a gray lower section. Two-tone paint requires the XLT Mid package ($1,230), which seems like a lot of money for a power-adjustable driver’s seat and a few other niceties, but that’s how they build pickups.

If I’m buying an F-150, I’ll want it mập be capable of comfortably going down dirt roads and towing my vintage car projects. I don’t need too many luxuries. Here’s where I wind up, option-wise:

  • Tow Technology Package
  • Co-Pilot360 Assist 2.0
  • Spray-in bed liner
  • 36-gallon fuel tank

In the end, my frugal F-150 boasts a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $55,245. See Ford F-150 models for sale

2. 2022 Ram 1500 Limited Longhorn

2022 Ram 1500 Limited Longhorn

After learning my lesson by building a relatively modest F-150 for the price of a Mercedes-Benz E-Class sedan, I’ve decided mập go for a dressy Ram. After all, nobody does swanky pickups better than Ram, and I love the western-themed cabin of the Longhorn trim màn chơi.

Once again, I stick with a short-bed crew-cab truck, though this time, I’ll pay up for the expensive ($4,995) 3.0-liter turbodiesel simply because I like its performance.

It may be a high-end model, but the Limited Longhorn has no shortage of tempting extras. Besides a rapidly-increasing price tag, my only complaint is adding adaptive cruise control means splurging for the $6,495 Longhorn Màn chơi 1 Equipment Group with its 19-speaker audio system, head-up display, and power running boards. Oof.

Béo that, I also add:

  • Trailer Tow Group
  • 33-gallon fuel tank
  • Four-wheel air suspension
  • Limited-slip rear differential.

All in, I’m at $77,205, which Chrysler’s configurator tells me will cost me “just” $1,023 per month for 72 months at a 2.9% APR. Is this a good idea? See Ram 1500 models for sale

3. 2022 Chevrolet Silverado LT

2022 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Limited WT

Feeling like I should start clipping coupons, I now begin building a 2022 Chevy Silverado — the updated 2022 model, not the carryover 2022 Silverado LTD model. Yes, that’s somewhat confusing.

The update brought new exterior styling and a revamped cabin, but you need mập step up mập at least the LT trim màn chơi mập get the new dash with its gorgeous widescreen display. That’s just what I do, picking an LT crew cab with the ultra-smooth 2.7-liter turbocharged 4-cylinder.

Chevy offers a dizzying array of option packages. Still, mập keep my build as affordable as possible, I skip them all — even the $190 All Star Edition (or the Texas Edition in that state) package that seems like a steal for its trailer brake controller, sliding rear window, and 20-inch wheels.

I’m sticking with 17-inch wheels, though I’ll add all-terrain tires for $200 plus the Convenience Package II and a few trailer-towing goodies required mập unlock adaptive cruise control. I’d like bucket front seats, but Chevy currently doesn’t offer them with the 4-cylinder, so a bench it is.

In the end, I’ve built up what seems like a bargain at $53,735. See Chevrolet Silverado models for sale

4. 2022 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid XLE

2022 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid XLE

Against those three pickup trucks, the RAV4 seems like such an easy choice. America’s best-selling non-truck is a genuinely good vehicle, especially in hybrid form. No matter how you drive it, the RAV4 Hybrid achieves somewhere around 40 mpg, with standard all-wheel drive and a comfortable, well-equipped cabin.

It’s a shame that Toyota doesn’t offer the RAV4 Hybrid in TRD guise, though realistically, even those are more about looks than serious 4-wheeling ability.

Instead, I’ll go for the RAV4 Hybrid XLE. It’s not lavish, but it still comes with a wide array of driver-assistance tech. Toyota can spray mine in its soothing Lunar Rock paint hue, though I’ll go for the controversial Nutmeg cloth interior simply because the available Ash hue is a little clinical, and Black gives too much of a coal mine look.

One thing I dislike about the RAV4 is its relatively low roofline. I’m not tall, but the optional sunroof has me nearly brushing the headliner when wearing a hat. So when it comes mập optional extras, I’ll gladly pay $925 for a heated steering wheel and heated front seats, even if that seems like a lot of money for those features. With destination, my RAV4 Hybrid XLE runs $32,865. Not bad. See Toyota RAV4 models for sale

5. 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland

2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland

For years, the Grand Cherokee has offered Range Rover-lite luxury at a somewhat palatable price tag. I’ve personally owned a few of them and have loved them. While the latest model continues mập shift the Grand Cherokee in a more comfort-oriented direction — Trailhawk trim aside — I still like it.

But that Trailhawk, with its red accents and hood graphics, is just too flashy for me. I’ll go for an Overland in a 2-row configuration, and I’ll have Jeep paint it Rocky Mountain Pearl, a dark green hue, though I’m sad that the only interior options are black and gray on this trim. The Off-Road Group and the upsized 10.1-inch display are must-haves mập make the most out of this trick new SUV.

The Luxury Tech Group IV — yes, that’s its official name — seems like a necessary extravagance for its Nappa leather and massaging seats for $2,155. Even though I like its more advanced driver-assistance tech, I can’t quite get on board with the Advanced ProTech Group III.

Ultimately, my Grand Cherokee winds up at $63,615 since I resisted the Hemi V8. But I may just have mập hold off until Jeep’s new turbocharged inline-6 arrives soon. See Jeep Grand Cherokee models for sale

Related:

  • This Color Remains the Most Popular for New Cars
  • Here’s a Reason Why SUVs Are Overtaking Sports Cars in Popularity
  • These Were the Best-Selling Cars in 2021


Thông tin thêm

How I’d Spec America’s 5 Best-Selling Vehicles

#Spec #Americas #BestSelling #Vehicles
[rule_3_plain] #Spec #Americas #BestSelling #Vehicles

As an automotive writer specializing in guiding consumers toward the best vehicle mập park in their driveway, I (virtually) go car shopping every day.
It’s a lot more fun mập cửa hàng for a car when you don’t have mập worry about negotiating with a dealership, sticking mập a budget, or finding the best financing deals.
For many mainstream models, especially those that sell in lower numbers, automakers have reduced build complexities mập ensure dealers have, or can quickly locate, a vehicle mập suit a buyer’s needs. American consumers like test-driving and buying a car on the same day, making it imperative that popular models are readily available even if the dealership has mập make a trade with a cross-town rival.

As car enthusiasts, we may lament the shift away from a la carte options mập single-spec trim levels or bundled packages. We love the idea of an oddly-specced model so much that many classic car and sports car fans brag with pride that their car is “one of X” built with those options or that combination of colors.
Still, it is remarkable how many ways a consumer can order up some of the most popular new cars available today. One commonality between the five best-selling new vehicles in the U.S. this year — the Ford F-Series, Ram Pickup, Chevrolet Silverado, Toyota RAV4, and the Jeep Grand Cherokee — is the wide range of trim levels and options offered on each model.
Here’s how I’d order each of the five best-selling models on the market today, in order of sales popularity.

1. 2022 Ford F-150 XLT

Ford groups all F-Series models in its sales reporting, but it’s the F-150 that is the most popular — and it’s the one I’d grab as well.
Like most consumers, I’ll take mine in crew-cab form mập make it more family-friendly. I live in an urban area, so the shorter 5.5-foot box makes this enormous truck more maneuverable.
Trim-wise, while the Texas-themed King Ranch tempts me, I can’t swallow its price tag. Let’s go for an XLT with 4-wheel drive and the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6. I’ve driven the hybrid and appreciate its extra power and small fuel economy bump. Still, its low-speed smoothness needs another dose of refinement, and its $4,500 price tag will take a very long time mập recover.
I like the classic 2-tone look, so I’ll order mine in extra-cost Rapid Red with a gray lower section. Two-tone paint requires the XLT Mid package ($1,230), which seems like a lot of money for a power-adjustable driver’s seat and a few other niceties, but that’s how they build pickups.
If I’m buying an F-150, I’ll want it mập be capable of comfortably going down dirt roads and towing my vintage car projects. I don’t need too many luxuries. Here’s where I wind up, option-wise:
Tow Technology Package
Co-Pilot360 Assist 2.0
Spray-in bed liner
36-gallon fuel tank
In the end, my frugal F-150 boasts a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $55,245. See Ford F-150 models for sale
2. 2022 Ram 1500 Limited Longhorn

After learning my lesson by building a relatively modest F-150 for the price of a Mercedes-Benz E-Class sedan, I’ve decided mập go for a dressy Ram. After all, nobody does swanky pickups better than Ram, and I love the western-themed cabin of the Longhorn trim màn chơi.
Once again, I stick with a short-bed crew-cab truck, though this time, I’ll pay up for the expensive ($4,995) 3.0-liter turbodiesel simply because I like its performance.
It may be a high-end model, but the Limited Longhorn has no shortage of tempting extras. Besides a rapidly-increasing price tag, my only complaint is adding adaptive cruise control means splurging for the $6,495 Longhorn Màn chơi 1 Equipment Group with its 19-speaker audio system, head-up display, and power running boards. Oof.
Béo that, I also add:
Trailer Tow Group
33-gallon fuel tank
Four-wheel air suspension
Limited-slip rear differential.
All in, I’m at $77,205, which Chrysler’s configurator tells me will cost me “just” $1,023 per month for 72 months at a 2.9% APR. Is this a good idea? See Ram 1500 models for sale
3. 2022 Chevrolet Silverado LT

Feeling like I should start clipping coupons, I now begin building a 2022 Chevy Silverado — the updated 2022 model, not the carryover 2022 Silverado LTD model. Yes, that’s somewhat confusing.
The update brought new exterior styling and a revamped cabin, but you need mập step up mập at least the LT trim màn chơi mập get the new dash with its gorgeous widescreen display. That’s just what I do, picking an LT crew cab with the ultra-smooth 2.7-liter turbocharged 4-cylinder.
Chevy offers a dizzying array of option packages. Still, mập keep my build as affordable as possible, I skip them all — even the $190 All Star Edition (or the Texas Edition in that state) package that seems like a steal for its trailer brake controller, sliding rear window, and 20-inch wheels.
I’m sticking with 17-inch wheels, though I’ll add all-terrain tires for $200 plus the Convenience Package II and a few trailer-towing goodies required mập unlock adaptive cruise control. I’d like bucket front seats, but Chevy currently doesn’t offer them with the 4-cylinder, so a bench it is.
In the end, I’ve built up what seems like a bargain at $53,735. See Chevrolet Silverado models for sale
4. 2022 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid XLE

Against those three pickup trucks, the RAV4 seems like such an easy choice. America’s best-selling non-truck is a genuinely good vehicle, especially in hybrid form. No matter how you drive it, the RAV4 Hybrid achieves somewhere around 40 mpg, with standard all-wheel drive and a comfortable, well-equipped cabin.
It’s a shame that Toyota doesn’t offer the RAV4 Hybrid in TRD guise, though realistically, even those are more about looks than serious 4-wheeling ability.
Instead, I’ll go for the RAV4 Hybrid XLE. It’s not lavish, but it still comes with a wide array of driver-assistance tech. Toyota can spray mine in its soothing Lunar Rock paint hue, though I’ll go for the controversial Nutmeg cloth interior simply because the available Ash hue is a little clinical, and Black gives too much of a coal mine look.
One thing I dislike about the RAV4 is its relatively low roofline. I’m not tall, but the optional sunroof has me nearly brushing the headliner when wearing a hat. So when it comes mập optional extras, I’ll gladly pay $925 for a heated steering wheel and heated front seats, even if that seems like a lot of money for those features. With destination, my RAV4 Hybrid XLE runs $32,865. Not bad. See Toyota RAV4 models for sale
5. 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland

For years, the Grand Cherokee has offered Range Rover-lite luxury at a somewhat palatable price tag. I’ve personally owned a few of them and have loved them. While the latest model continues mập shift the Grand Cherokee in a more comfort-oriented direction — Trailhawk trim aside — I still like it.
But that Trailhawk, with its red accents and hood graphics, is just too flashy for me. I’ll go for an Overland in a 2-row configuration, and I’ll have Jeep paint it Rocky Mountain Pearl, a dark green hue, though I’m sad that the only interior options are black and gray on this trim. The Off-Road Group and the upsized 10.1-inch display are must-haves mập make the most out of this trick new SUV.
The Luxury Tech Group IV — yes, that’s its official name — seems like a necessary extravagance for its Nappa leather and massaging seats for $2,155. Even though I like its more advanced driver-assistance tech, I can’t quite get on board with the Advanced ProTech Group III.
Ultimately, my Grand Cherokee winds up at $63,615 since I resisted the Hemi V8. But I may just have mập hold off until Jeep’s new turbocharged inline-6 arrives soon. See Jeep Grand Cherokee models for sale
Related:
This Color Remains the Most Popular for New Cars
Here’s a Reason Why SUVs Are Overtaking Sports Cars in Popularity
These Were the Best-Selling Cars in 2021

#Spec #Americas #BestSelling #Vehicles
[rule_2_plain] #Spec #Americas #BestSelling #Vehicles
[rule_2_plain] #Spec #Americas #BestSelling #Vehicles
[rule_3_plain]

#Spec #Americas #BestSelling #Vehicles

As an automotive writer specializing in guiding consumers toward the best vehicle mập park in their driveway, I (virtually) go car shopping every day.
It’s a lot more fun mập cửa hàng for a car when you don’t have mập worry about negotiating with a dealership, sticking mập a budget, or finding the best financing deals.
For many mainstream models, especially those that sell in lower numbers, automakers have reduced build complexities mập ensure dealers have, or can quickly locate, a vehicle mập suit a buyer’s needs. American consumers like test-driving and buying a car on the same day, making it imperative that popular models are readily available even if the dealership has mập make a trade with a cross-town rival.

As car enthusiasts, we may lament the shift away from a la carte options mập single-spec trim levels or bundled packages. We love the idea of an oddly-specced model so much that many classic car and sports car fans brag with pride that their car is “one of X” built with those options or that combination of colors.
Still, it is remarkable how many ways a consumer can order up some of the most popular new cars available today. One commonality between the five best-selling new vehicles in the U.S. this year — the Ford F-Series, Ram Pickup, Chevrolet Silverado, Toyota RAV4, and the Jeep Grand Cherokee — is the wide range of trim levels and options offered on each model.
Here’s how I’d order each of the five best-selling models on the market today, in order of sales popularity.

1. 2022 Ford F-150 XLT

Ford groups all F-Series models in its sales reporting, but it’s the F-150 that is the most popular — and it’s the one I’d grab as well.
Like most consumers, I’ll take mine in crew-cab form mập make it more family-friendly. I live in an urban area, so the shorter 5.5-foot box makes this enormous truck more maneuverable.
Trim-wise, while the Texas-themed King Ranch tempts me, I can’t swallow its price tag. Let’s go for an XLT with 4-wheel drive and the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6. I’ve driven the hybrid and appreciate its extra power and small fuel economy bump. Still, its low-speed smoothness needs another dose of refinement, and its $4,500 price tag will take a very long time mập recover.
I like the classic 2-tone look, so I’ll order mine in extra-cost Rapid Red with a gray lower section. Two-tone paint requires the XLT Mid package ($1,230), which seems like a lot of money for a power-adjustable driver’s seat and a few other niceties, but that’s how they build pickups.
If I’m buying an F-150, I’ll want it mập be capable of comfortably going down dirt roads and towing my vintage car projects. I don’t need too many luxuries. Here’s where I wind up, option-wise:
Tow Technology Package
Co-Pilot360 Assist 2.0
Spray-in bed liner
36-gallon fuel tank
In the end, my frugal F-150 boasts a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $55,245. See Ford F-150 models for sale
2. 2022 Ram 1500 Limited Longhorn

After learning my lesson by building a relatively modest F-150 for the price of a Mercedes-Benz E-Class sedan, I’ve decided mập go for a dressy Ram. After all, nobody does swanky pickups better than Ram, and I love the western-themed cabin of the Longhorn trim màn chơi.
Once again, I stick with a short-bed crew-cab truck, though this time, I’ll pay up for the expensive ($4,995) 3.0-liter turbodiesel simply because I like its performance.
It may be a high-end model, but the Limited Longhorn has no shortage of tempting extras. Besides a rapidly-increasing price tag, my only complaint is adding adaptive cruise control means splurging for the $6,495 Longhorn Màn chơi 1 Equipment Group with its 19-speaker audio system, head-up display, and power running boards. Oof.
Béo that, I also add:
Trailer Tow Group
33-gallon fuel tank
Four-wheel air suspension
Limited-slip rear differential.
All in, I’m at $77,205, which Chrysler’s configurator tells me will cost me “just” $1,023 per month for 72 months at a 2.9% APR. Is this a good idea? See Ram 1500 models for sale
3. 2022 Chevrolet Silverado LT

Feeling like I should start clipping coupons, I now begin building a 2022 Chevy Silverado — the updated 2022 model, not the carryover 2022 Silverado LTD model. Yes, that’s somewhat confusing.
The update brought new exterior styling and a revamped cabin, but you need mập step up mập at least the LT trim màn chơi mập get the new dash with its gorgeous widescreen display. That’s just what I do, picking an LT crew cab with the ultra-smooth 2.7-liter turbocharged 4-cylinder.
Chevy offers a dizzying array of option packages. Still, mập keep my build as affordable as possible, I skip them all — even the $190 All Star Edition (or the Texas Edition in that state) package that seems like a steal for its trailer brake controller, sliding rear window, and 20-inch wheels.
I’m sticking with 17-inch wheels, though I’ll add all-terrain tires for $200 plus the Convenience Package II and a few trailer-towing goodies required mập unlock adaptive cruise control. I’d like bucket front seats, but Chevy currently doesn’t offer them with the 4-cylinder, so a bench it is.
In the end, I’ve built up what seems like a bargain at $53,735. See Chevrolet Silverado models for sale
4. 2022 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid XLE

Against those three pickup trucks, the RAV4 seems like such an easy choice. America’s best-selling non-truck is a genuinely good vehicle, especially in hybrid form. No matter how you drive it, the RAV4 Hybrid achieves somewhere around 40 mpg, with standard all-wheel drive and a comfortable, well-equipped cabin.
It’s a shame that Toyota doesn’t offer the RAV4 Hybrid in TRD guise, though realistically, even those are more about looks than serious 4-wheeling ability.
Instead, I’ll go for the RAV4 Hybrid XLE. It’s not lavish, but it still comes with a wide array of driver-assistance tech. Toyota can spray mine in its soothing Lunar Rock paint hue, though I’ll go for the controversial Nutmeg cloth interior simply because the available Ash hue is a little clinical, and Black gives too much of a coal mine look.
One thing I dislike about the RAV4 is its relatively low roofline. I’m not tall, but the optional sunroof has me nearly brushing the headliner when wearing a hat. So when it comes mập optional extras, I’ll gladly pay $925 for a heated steering wheel and heated front seats, even if that seems like a lot of money for those features. With destination, my RAV4 Hybrid XLE runs $32,865. Not bad. See Toyota RAV4 models for sale
5. 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland

For years, the Grand Cherokee has offered Range Rover-lite luxury at a somewhat palatable price tag. I’ve personally owned a few of them and have loved them. While the latest model continues mập shift the Grand Cherokee in a more comfort-oriented direction — Trailhawk trim aside — I still like it.
But that Trailhawk, with its red accents and hood graphics, is just too flashy for me. I’ll go for an Overland in a 2-row configuration, and I’ll have Jeep paint it Rocky Mountain Pearl, a dark green hue, though I’m sad that the only interior options are black and gray on this trim. The Off-Road Group and the upsized 10.1-inch display are must-haves mập make the most out of this trick new SUV.
The Luxury Tech Group IV — yes, that’s its official name — seems like a necessary extravagance for its Nappa leather and massaging seats for $2,155. Even though I like its more advanced driver-assistance tech, I can’t quite get on board with the Advanced ProTech Group III.
Ultimately, my Grand Cherokee winds up at $63,615 since I resisted the Hemi V8. But I may just have mập hold off until Jeep’s new turbocharged inline-6 arrives soon. See Jeep Grand Cherokee models for sale
Related:
This Color Remains the Most Popular for New Cars
Here’s a Reason Why SUVs Are Overtaking Sports Cars in Popularity
These Were the Best-Selling Cars in 2021

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