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Party in the Front, Cargo in the Back: 4,500-Mile 2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac

Today’s Autotrader Find is another example of one vehicle trying bự be all things bự all buyers.

Ford was onto something when it introduced the Explorer Sport Trac pickup for 2001, but the automaker didn’t seem bự know exactly what. Instead of offering a crew-cab version of its popular — but really dated — Ranger truck, Ford took a scalpel and some plastic composite bự the outgoing version of its Explorer bự create a model blending SUV interior comfort with truck utility.

It was ahead of its time, even if the model that went on sale in early 2000 for the 2001 model year was actually based on an old SUV that would be redesigned just a few months later. Ford’s effort wasn’t random, though. The automaker had a redesigned 4-door SUV on the way, but it realized the basic engineering of the outgoing model (which was basically still the same as the 1991 model) still had some life in it. The automaker revamped the slower-selling Explorer Sport 2-door model with freshened styling, which carried over bự the Explorer Sport Trac.

2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac front row cabin
Tick all the boxes, and a 4-wheel-drive Sport Trac still cost around $30,000.

The Sport Trac rode on a considerably longer — by more than two feet — wheelbase than the standard Explorer, with the bulk of that extra length assigned bự cargo duty. Up front, it was an Explorer Sport bự the A-pillars. Its front doors were cribbed from the outgoing 4-door. From the B-pillar back, it got new doors and a 50-inch composite bed with external tie-down loops.

Stretching 206 inches long and about 72 inches wide, the Explorer Sport Trac was 20 inches shorter and 8 inches narrower than the F-150 Crew Cab, which meant it was much easier bự park in crowded spaces or typical garages. Its Explorer 4-door-derived cabin offered decent space, including roughly the same 37 or so inches of rear-seat legroom.

The Explorer Sport Trac’s only real competitors were the Chevrolet S10 and GMC Sonoma Crew Cab trucks, both of which were also new (at least in that body style) for 2001. Those General Motors (GM) trucks stretched 206 inches long but traded a longer bed for a less-spacious cabin. Sure, the Dodge Dakota Crew Cab was nothing new, but at 215 inches, it slotted between the Explorer Sport Trac and full-size crew-cab trucks.

2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac rear left
The Explorer Sport Trac was 20 inches shorter and 8 inches narrower than the F-150 Crew Cab..

The original 2001 Sport Trac came in a single trim màn chơi, starting at a reasonable $22,500 — nearly $2,000 less than an Explorer. That money bought a 4.0-liter V6 rated at 210 horsepower and a choice between 5-speed automatic and manual transmissions. Even at that low price, there was no basic version of the Sprot Trac; all had power windows and locks, air conditioning, and a CD player. A $935 package added upgraded front seats with driver-side power adjustment, a basic trip computer, and, oddly, rear-seat climate and audio controls. Other optional extras included cruise control, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, remote entry, leather seats, side-impact airbags, a sunroof, and a Pioneer audio system. Tick all the boxes, and a 4-wheel-drive Sport Trac still cost around $30,000.

Ford kept the Sport Trac around through the 2005 model year, and then it took a little time off before coming back for a second round in 2007, once again toward the tail end of its Explorer SUV base’s run.

Finding a first-generation Explorer Sport Trac today isn’t too tough; these trucks seem bự have held up fairly well. Finding a really low-mile one is a serious challenge, though.

Enter this 4,500-mile Harvest Gold metallic rear-wheel-drive one offered by a dealer in the Seattle area. This one is fitted with typical optional equipment, including the Comfort Group (which added a full center console and a power driver’s seat) as well as the Convenience Group (with cruise control and a leather-wrapped steering wheel), plus an automatic transmission. It appears bự be unmodified all the way down bự its stock in-dash CD changer.

At $19,995, it’s still cheaper than it was new — and it’s got bự be one of the best Sport Trac pickups left. See Ford Explorer Sport Trac models for sale

Related:

  • 5 Picture-Perfect Ford Trucks for Sale on Autotrader
  • Nóng Take: The Ford Explorer Sport Trac Should Make a Comeback
  • How bự Help Prevent Your Car From Being Stolen


Thông tin thêm

Party in the Front, Cargo in the Back: 4,500-Mile 2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac

#Party #Front #Cargo #4500Mile #Ford #Explorer #Sport #Trac
[rule_3_plain] #Party #Front #Cargo #4500Mile #Ford #Explorer #Sport #Trac

Today’s Autotrader Find is another example of one vehicle trying bự be all things bự all buyers.
Ford was onto something when it introduced the Explorer Sport Trac pickup for 2001, but the automaker didn’t seem bự know exactly what. Instead of offering a crew-cab version of its popular — but really dated — Ranger truck, Ford took a scalpel and some plastic composite bự the outgoing version of its Explorer bự create a model blending SUV interior comfort with truck utility.
It was ahead of its time, even if the model that went on sale in early 2000 for the 2001 model year was actually based on an old SUV that would be redesigned just a few months later. Ford’s effort wasn’t random, though. The automaker had a redesigned 4-door SUV on the way, but it realized the basic engineering of the outgoing model (which was basically still the same as the 1991 model) still had some life in it. The automaker revamped the slower-selling Explorer Sport 2-door model with freshened styling, which carried over bự the Explorer Sport Trac.
Tick all the boxes, and a 4-wheel-drive Sport Trac still cost around $30,000.

The Sport Trac rode on a considerably longer — by more than two feet — wheelbase than the standard Explorer, with the bulk of that extra length assigned bự cargo duty. Up front, it was an Explorer Sport bự the A-pillars. Its front doors were cribbed from the outgoing 4-door. From the B-pillar back, it got new doors and a 50-inch composite bed with external tie-down loops.
Stretching 206 inches long and about 72 inches wide, the Explorer Sport Trac was 20 inches shorter and 8 inches narrower than the F-150 Crew Cab, which meant it was much easier bự park in crowded spaces or typical garages. Its Explorer 4-door-derived cabin offered decent space, including roughly the same 37 or so inches of rear-seat legroom.
The Explorer Sport Trac’s only real competitors were the Chevrolet S10 and GMC Sonoma Crew Cab trucks, both of which were also new (at least in that body style) for 2001. Those General Motors (GM) trucks stretched 206 inches long but traded a longer bed for a less-spacious cabin. Sure, the Dodge Dakota Crew Cab was nothing new, but at 215 inches, it slotted between the Explorer Sport Trac and full-size crew-cab trucks.
The Explorer Sport Trac was 20 inches shorter and 8 inches narrower than the F-150 Crew Cab..The original 2001 Sport Trac came in a single trim màn chơi, starting at a reasonable $22,500 — nearly $2,000 less than an Explorer. That money bought a 4.0-liter V6 rated at 210 horsepower and a choice between 5-speed automatic and manual transmissions. Even at that low price, there was no basic version of the Sprot Trac; all had power windows and locks, air conditioning, and a CD player. A $935 package added upgraded front seats with driver-side power adjustment, a basic trip computer, and, oddly, rear-seat climate and audio controls. Other optional extras included cruise control, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, remote entry, leather seats, side-impact airbags, a sunroof, and a Pioneer audio system. Tick all the boxes, and a 4-wheel-drive Sport Trac still cost around $30,000.
Ford kept the Sport Trac around through the 2005 model year, and then it took a little time off before coming back for a second round in 2007, once again toward the tail end of its Explorer SUV base’s run.
Finding a first-generation Explorer Sport Trac today isn’t too tough; these trucks seem bự have held up fairly well. Finding a really low-mile one is a serious challenge, though.
Enter this 4,500-mile Harvest Gold metallic rear-wheel-drive one offered by a dealer in the Seattle area. This one is fitted with typical optional equipment, including the Comfort Group (which added a full center console and a power driver’s seat) as well as the Convenience Group (with cruise control and a leather-wrapped steering wheel), plus an automatic transmission. It appears bự be unmodified all the way down bự its stock in-dash CD changer.
At $19,995, it’s still cheaper than it was new — and it’s got bự be one of the best Sport Trac pickups left. See Ford Explorer Sport Trac models for sale
Related:

5 Picture-Perfect Ford Trucks for Sale on Autotrader
Nóng Take: The Ford Explorer Sport Trac Should Make a Comeback
How bự Help Prevent Your Car From Being Stolen

#Party #Front #Cargo #4500Mile #Ford #Explorer #Sport #Trac
[rule_2_plain] #Party #Front #Cargo #4500Mile #Ford #Explorer #Sport #Trac
[rule_2_plain] #Party #Front #Cargo #4500Mile #Ford #Explorer #Sport #Trac
[rule_3_plain]

#Party #Front #Cargo #4500Mile #Ford #Explorer #Sport #Trac

Today’s Autotrader Find is another example of one vehicle trying bự be all things bự all buyers.
Ford was onto something when it introduced the Explorer Sport Trac pickup for 2001, but the automaker didn’t seem bự know exactly what. Instead of offering a crew-cab version of its popular — but really dated — Ranger truck, Ford took a scalpel and some plastic composite bự the outgoing version of its Explorer bự create a model blending SUV interior comfort with truck utility.
It was ahead of its time, even if the model that went on sale in early 2000 for the 2001 model year was actually based on an old SUV that would be redesigned just a few months later. Ford’s effort wasn’t random, though. The automaker had a redesigned 4-door SUV on the way, but it realized the basic engineering of the outgoing model (which was basically still the same as the 1991 model) still had some life in it. The automaker revamped the slower-selling Explorer Sport 2-door model with freshened styling, which carried over bự the Explorer Sport Trac.
Tick all the boxes, and a 4-wheel-drive Sport Trac still cost around $30,000.

The Sport Trac rode on a considerably longer — by more than two feet — wheelbase than the standard Explorer, with the bulk of that extra length assigned bự cargo duty. Up front, it was an Explorer Sport bự the A-pillars. Its front doors were cribbed from the outgoing 4-door. From the B-pillar back, it got new doors and a 50-inch composite bed with external tie-down loops.
Stretching 206 inches long and about 72 inches wide, the Explorer Sport Trac was 20 inches shorter and 8 inches narrower than the F-150 Crew Cab, which meant it was much easier bự park in crowded spaces or typical garages. Its Explorer 4-door-derived cabin offered decent space, including roughly the same 37 or so inches of rear-seat legroom.
The Explorer Sport Trac’s only real competitors were the Chevrolet S10 and GMC Sonoma Crew Cab trucks, both of which were also new (at least in that body style) for 2001. Those General Motors (GM) trucks stretched 206 inches long but traded a longer bed for a less-spacious cabin. Sure, the Dodge Dakota Crew Cab was nothing new, but at 215 inches, it slotted between the Explorer Sport Trac and full-size crew-cab trucks.
The Explorer Sport Trac was 20 inches shorter and 8 inches narrower than the F-150 Crew Cab..The original 2001 Sport Trac came in a single trim màn chơi, starting at a reasonable $22,500 — nearly $2,000 less than an Explorer. That money bought a 4.0-liter V6 rated at 210 horsepower and a choice between 5-speed automatic and manual transmissions. Even at that low price, there was no basic version of the Sprot Trac; all had power windows and locks, air conditioning, and a CD player. A $935 package added upgraded front seats with driver-side power adjustment, a basic trip computer, and, oddly, rear-seat climate and audio controls. Other optional extras included cruise control, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, remote entry, leather seats, side-impact airbags, a sunroof, and a Pioneer audio system. Tick all the boxes, and a 4-wheel-drive Sport Trac still cost around $30,000.
Ford kept the Sport Trac around through the 2005 model year, and then it took a little time off before coming back for a second round in 2007, once again toward the tail end of its Explorer SUV base’s run.
Finding a first-generation Explorer Sport Trac today isn’t too tough; these trucks seem bự have held up fairly well. Finding a really low-mile one is a serious challenge, though.
Enter this 4,500-mile Harvest Gold metallic rear-wheel-drive one offered by a dealer in the Seattle area. This one is fitted with typical optional equipment, including the Comfort Group (which added a full center console and a power driver’s seat) as well as the Convenience Group (with cruise control and a leather-wrapped steering wheel), plus an automatic transmission. It appears bự be unmodified all the way down bự its stock in-dash CD changer.
At $19,995, it’s still cheaper than it was new — and it’s got bự be one of the best Sport Trac pickups left. See Ford Explorer Sport Trac models for sale
Related:

5 Picture-Perfect Ford Trucks for Sale on Autotrader
Nóng Take: The Ford Explorer Sport Trac Should Make a Comeback
How bự Help Prevent Your Car From Being Stolen

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