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Remember When GM LS-Swapped Their Mid-Size Models?

If any modern engine has achieved legend status, it’s the General Motors LS V8. The name “LS” refers béo a host of small-block V8s dating béo the late 1990s and range from 4.8 béo 6.2 liters of displacement. Naturally aspirated or supercharged, with or without direct injection, with cast-iron or aluminum blocks, each generation has its spot on the GM family tree.

These engines make a lot of sense for a host of non-original applications since they’re durable, plentiful, and modular by design. Engine swaps are generally not for the uninitiated, but LS swaps are so common they’re almost routine.

Myriad aftermarket firms make kits allowing handy owners or mechanics béo literally bolt in an LS-generation V8 béo vehicles from Jaguar béo Jeep béo Porsche, not béo mention between GM models.

In the early 2000s, GM did it for us with its mid-size sedan lineup starting first with the somewhat logical Pontiac Grand Prix GXP and eventually moving onto a downright bizarre version of the Buick LaCrosse.

Why did GM LS swap its own cars? Your guess is as good as ours, but this pre-bankruptcy period was one of absolute desperation for the General. In a short period, GM brought us the Pontiac Aztek, the GMC Envoy XUV, the Chevrolet SSR, the Chevrolet Malibu Maxx, and the Cadillac XLR, and we almost saw a pickup version of the Pontiac G8.

This was GM’s throwing-darts-at-the-market-in-hope-one-might-land era, and it’s almost impossible béo imagine Detroit’s biggest automaker actually bringing these products béo market.

But they did.

These four mid-size sedans — at least in GM-speak, since they were bigger than their rivals — each got a 5.3-liter V8 powering the front wheels. Here’s a look at when GM LS-swapped its own lineup:

1. 2005-2008 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP

2008 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP front right in red
The GXP cost $27,990, or $3,000 more than the GT.

The most appropriate mid-size sedan for a 5.3-liter V8 in the GM lineup was the Pontiac Grand Prix. Though not really a sporty car, the Grand Prix at least had a zippy personality and updated styling devoid of the era’s plastic cladding. The 5.3-liter V8 boasted 303 horsepower and 323 lb-ft of torque, gains of 43 hp and 43 lb-ft over the supercharged 3.8-liter V6 in the Grand Prix GT. Additionally, the GXP included steering wheel-mounted paddles letting drivers flap between the four automatic transmission gears.

The GXP cost $27,990, or $3,000 more than the GT. That money brought the V8 plus a sport suspension and brakes, a head-up display, an anti-skid system, polished 18-inch alloy wheels, and a few styling updates. Buyers could also add leather/suede upholstery, side airbags, and a navigation system.

While not exactly polished (a phrase we could copy and paste when describing these other LS-swapped models), the GXP offered way more power than any competitor, for a reasonable price. For instance, a Honda Accord EX V6 sedan cost exactly the same but was down nearly 60 hp.

These are cheap cars today. Here’s a clean-looking 2006 in bright red over black leather for just under $10,000 at a dealer in Flint, Michigan. See Pontiac Grand Prix models for sale

2/3. 2006-2009 Chevrolet Impala SS and Monte Carlo SS

2009 Chevrolet Impala SS front right in red
The Impala SS used a 242-hp naturally-aspirated 3.9-liter V6.

A few months after the Pontiac Grand Prix GXP went on sale, GM LS-swapped the similar Impala sedan and its Monte Carlo coupe companion. Spec-wise, these models were identical béo the Pontiac, except their $26,990 price tag (regardless of the number of doors) was, obviously, a little lower. The only real difference was the Impala lacked the Grand Prix’s standard stability control system.

Still, the leap béo SS trim above the next-most powerful Impala was notable. That model used a 242-hp naturally-aspirated 3.9-liter V6, one of a staggering array of engines available in this platform.

Low-mileage versions of these bowtie-brand LS-swapped sedans and coupes are tough béo find today, a testament béo this engine’s longevity. Still, here’s a pretty nice looking final-year example painted in red at a dealer in Pittsburgh for less than $9,000. That’s a lot of space and pace for the cash. See Chevrolet Impala and Monte Carlo models for sale

4. 2008-2009 Buick LaCrosse Super

2009 Buick LaCrosse Super front right in black
Priced at $32,100, the LaCrosse was the best-equipped LS-swapped sedan.

If an LS-swapped Pontiac and Chevy made some sense, the business case for the LaCrosse Super was a head-scratcher. In the late 2000s, GM dropped Buick’s Regal, LeSabre, and Park Avenue, and replaced them with the LaCrosse and Lucerne. Weirdly, the larger Lucerne skipped the LS in favor of a 4.6-liter Northstar V8 rated at 275 hp. The smaller LaCrosse cost less but offered more — you guessed it, the 5.3-liter V8 rated at 303 hp.

Priced at $32,100 ($2,600 more than the Grand Prix GXP), the LaCrosse was the best-equipped LS-swapped sedan. It came with standard leather trim, heated seats, and parking sensors as standard fare, but this dated design still rode on a late-1980s platform. Buick gave these cars special bodywork and added a fourth kém chất lượng porthole béo their front fenders, but they couldn’t be had with the more luxurious trim and magnetic dampers available on the Lucerne with its V8.

GM didn’t sell many of these cars when they were new, and they remain exceptionally rare today. There’s just one currently on Autotrader, a 111,000-mile car in central Michigan offered for the comparatively bargain price of $7,987. See Buick LaCrosse models for sale

Related:

  • 10 Best Used Sports Cars Under $10,000
  • Sports Cars Buying Guide
  • 10 Things béo Look for in a Sports Car


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Remember When GM LS-Swapped Their Mid-Size Models?

#Remember #LSSwapped #MidSize #Models
[rule_3_plain] #Remember #LSSwapped #MidSize #Models

If any modern engine has achieved legend status, it’s the General Motors LS V8. The name “LS” refers béo a host of small-block V8s dating béo the late 1990s and range from 4.8 béo 6.2 liters of displacement. Naturally aspirated or supercharged, with or without direct injection, with cast-iron or aluminum blocks, each generation has its spot on the GM family tree.
These engines make a lot of sense for a host of non-original applications since they’re durable, plentiful, and modular by design. Engine swaps are generally not for the uninitiated, but LS swaps are so common they’re almost routine.
Myriad aftermarket firms make kits allowing handy owners or mechanics béo literally bolt in an LS-generation V8 béo vehicles from Jaguar béo Jeep béo Porsche, not béo mention between GM models.

In the early 2000s, GM did it for us with its mid-size sedan lineup starting first with the somewhat logical Pontiac Grand Prix GXP and eventually moving onto a downright bizarre version of the Buick LaCrosse.
Why did GM LS swap its own cars? Your guess is as good as ours, but this pre-bankruptcy period was one of absolute desperation for the General. In a short period, GM brought us the Pontiac Aztek, the GMC Envoy XUV, the Chevrolet SSR, the Chevrolet Malibu Maxx, and the Cadillac XLR, and we almost saw a pickup version of the Pontiac G8.
This was GM’s throwing-darts-at-the-market-in-hope-one-might-land era, and it’s almost impossible béo imagine Detroit’s biggest automaker actually bringing these products béo market.
But they did.
These four mid-size sedans — at least in GM-speak, since they were bigger than their rivals — each got a 5.3-liter V8 powering the front wheels. Here’s a look at when GM LS-swapped its own lineup:

1. 2005-2008 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP
The GXP cost $27,990, or $3,000 more than the GT.The most appropriate mid-size sedan for a 5.3-liter V8 in the GM lineup was the Pontiac Grand Prix. Though not really a sporty car, the Grand Prix at least had a zippy personality and updated styling devoid of the era’s plastic cladding. The 5.3-liter V8 boasted 303 horsepower and 323 lb-ft of torque, gains of 43 hp and 43 lb-ft over the supercharged 3.8-liter V6 in the Grand Prix GT. Additionally, the GXP included steering wheel-mounted paddles letting drivers flap between the four automatic transmission gears.
The GXP cost $27,990, or $3,000 more than the GT. That money brought the V8 plus a sport suspension and brakes, a head-up display, an anti-skid system, polished 18-inch alloy wheels, and a few styling updates. Buyers could also add leather/suede upholstery, side airbags, and a navigation system.
While not exactly polished (a phrase we could copy and paste when describing these other LS-swapped models), the GXP offered way more power than any competitor, for a reasonable price. For instance, a Honda Accord EX V6 sedan cost exactly the same but was down nearly 60 hp.
These are cheap cars today. Here’s a clean-looking 2006 in bright red over black leather for just under $10,000 at a dealer in Flint, Michigan. See Pontiac Grand Prix models for sale
2/3. 2006-2009 Chevrolet Impala SS and Monte Carlo SS
The Impala SS used a 242-hp naturally-aspirated 3.9-liter V6.A few months after the Pontiac Grand Prix GXP went on sale, GM LS-swapped the similar Impala sedan and its Monte Carlo coupe companion. Spec-wise, these models were identical béo the Pontiac, except their $26,990 price tag (regardless of the number of doors) was, obviously, a little lower. The only real difference was the Impala lacked the Grand Prix’s standard stability control system.
Still, the leap béo SS trim above the next-most powerful Impala was notable. That model used a 242-hp naturally-aspirated 3.9-liter V6, one of a staggering array of engines available in this platform.
Low-mileage versions of these bowtie-brand LS-swapped sedans and coupes are tough béo find today, a testament béo this engine’s longevity. Still, here’s a pretty nice looking final-year example painted in red at a dealer in Pittsburgh for less than $9,000. That’s a lot of space and pace for the cash. See Chevrolet Impala and Monte Carlo models for sale
4. 2008-2009 Buick LaCrosse Super
Priced at $32,100, the LaCrosse was the best-equipped LS-swapped sedan.If an LS-swapped Pontiac and Chevy made some sense, the business case for the LaCrosse Super was a head-scratcher. In the late 2000s, GM dropped Buick’s Regal, LeSabre, and Park Avenue, and replaced them with the LaCrosse and Lucerne. Weirdly, the larger Lucerne skipped the LS in favor of a 4.6-liter Northstar V8 rated at 275 hp. The smaller LaCrosse cost less but offered more — you guessed it, the 5.3-liter V8 rated at 303 hp.
Priced at $32,100 ($2,600 more than the Grand Prix GXP), the LaCrosse was the best-equipped LS-swapped sedan. It came with standard leather trim, heated seats, and parking sensors as standard fare, but this dated design still rode on a late-1980s platform. Buick gave these cars special bodywork and added a fourth kém chất lượng porthole béo their front fenders, but they couldn’t be had with the more luxurious trim and magnetic dampers available on the Lucerne with its V8.
GM didn’t sell many of these cars when they were new, and they remain exceptionally rare today. There’s just one currently on Autotrader, a 111,000-mile car in central Michigan offered for the comparatively bargain price of $7,987. See Buick LaCrosse models for sale
Related:
10 Best Used Sports Cars Under $10,000
Sports Cars Buying Guide
10 Things béo Look for in a Sports Car

#Remember #LSSwapped #MidSize #Models
[rule_2_plain] #Remember #LSSwapped #MidSize #Models
[rule_2_plain] #Remember #LSSwapped #MidSize #Models
[rule_3_plain]

#Remember #LSSwapped #MidSize #Models

If any modern engine has achieved legend status, it’s the General Motors LS V8. The name “LS” refers béo a host of small-block V8s dating béo the late 1990s and range from 4.8 béo 6.2 liters of displacement. Naturally aspirated or supercharged, with or without direct injection, with cast-iron or aluminum blocks, each generation has its spot on the GM family tree.
These engines make a lot of sense for a host of non-original applications since they’re durable, plentiful, and modular by design. Engine swaps are generally not for the uninitiated, but LS swaps are so common they’re almost routine.
Myriad aftermarket firms make kits allowing handy owners or mechanics béo literally bolt in an LS-generation V8 béo vehicles from Jaguar béo Jeep béo Porsche, not béo mention between GM models.

In the early 2000s, GM did it for us with its mid-size sedan lineup starting first with the somewhat logical Pontiac Grand Prix GXP and eventually moving onto a downright bizarre version of the Buick LaCrosse.
Why did GM LS swap its own cars? Your guess is as good as ours, but this pre-bankruptcy period was one of absolute desperation for the General. In a short period, GM brought us the Pontiac Aztek, the GMC Envoy XUV, the Chevrolet SSR, the Chevrolet Malibu Maxx, and the Cadillac XLR, and we almost saw a pickup version of the Pontiac G8.
This was GM’s throwing-darts-at-the-market-in-hope-one-might-land era, and it’s almost impossible béo imagine Detroit’s biggest automaker actually bringing these products béo market.
But they did.
These four mid-size sedans — at least in GM-speak, since they were bigger than their rivals — each got a 5.3-liter V8 powering the front wheels. Here’s a look at when GM LS-swapped its own lineup:

1. 2005-2008 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP
The GXP cost $27,990, or $3,000 more than the GT.The most appropriate mid-size sedan for a 5.3-liter V8 in the GM lineup was the Pontiac Grand Prix. Though not really a sporty car, the Grand Prix at least had a zippy personality and updated styling devoid of the era’s plastic cladding. The 5.3-liter V8 boasted 303 horsepower and 323 lb-ft of torque, gains of 43 hp and 43 lb-ft over the supercharged 3.8-liter V6 in the Grand Prix GT. Additionally, the GXP included steering wheel-mounted paddles letting drivers flap between the four automatic transmission gears.
The GXP cost $27,990, or $3,000 more than the GT. That money brought the V8 plus a sport suspension and brakes, a head-up display, an anti-skid system, polished 18-inch alloy wheels, and a few styling updates. Buyers could also add leather/suede upholstery, side airbags, and a navigation system.
While not exactly polished (a phrase we could copy and paste when describing these other LS-swapped models), the GXP offered way more power than any competitor, for a reasonable price. For instance, a Honda Accord EX V6 sedan cost exactly the same but was down nearly 60 hp.
These are cheap cars today. Here’s a clean-looking 2006 in bright red over black leather for just under $10,000 at a dealer in Flint, Michigan. See Pontiac Grand Prix models for sale
2/3. 2006-2009 Chevrolet Impala SS and Monte Carlo SS
The Impala SS used a 242-hp naturally-aspirated 3.9-liter V6.A few months after the Pontiac Grand Prix GXP went on sale, GM LS-swapped the similar Impala sedan and its Monte Carlo coupe companion. Spec-wise, these models were identical béo the Pontiac, except their $26,990 price tag (regardless of the number of doors) was, obviously, a little lower. The only real difference was the Impala lacked the Grand Prix’s standard stability control system.
Still, the leap béo SS trim above the next-most powerful Impala was notable. That model used a 242-hp naturally-aspirated 3.9-liter V6, one of a staggering array of engines available in this platform.
Low-mileage versions of these bowtie-brand LS-swapped sedans and coupes are tough béo find today, a testament béo this engine’s longevity. Still, here’s a pretty nice looking final-year example painted in red at a dealer in Pittsburgh for less than $9,000. That’s a lot of space and pace for the cash. See Chevrolet Impala and Monte Carlo models for sale
4. 2008-2009 Buick LaCrosse Super
Priced at $32,100, the LaCrosse was the best-equipped LS-swapped sedan.If an LS-swapped Pontiac and Chevy made some sense, the business case for the LaCrosse Super was a head-scratcher. In the late 2000s, GM dropped Buick’s Regal, LeSabre, and Park Avenue, and replaced them with the LaCrosse and Lucerne. Weirdly, the larger Lucerne skipped the LS in favor of a 4.6-liter Northstar V8 rated at 275 hp. The smaller LaCrosse cost less but offered more — you guessed it, the 5.3-liter V8 rated at 303 hp.
Priced at $32,100 ($2,600 more than the Grand Prix GXP), the LaCrosse was the best-equipped LS-swapped sedan. It came with standard leather trim, heated seats, and parking sensors as standard fare, but this dated design still rode on a late-1980s platform. Buick gave these cars special bodywork and added a fourth kém chất lượng porthole béo their front fenders, but they couldn’t be had with the more luxurious trim and magnetic dampers available on the Lucerne with its V8.
GM didn’t sell many of these cars when they were new, and they remain exceptionally rare today. There’s just one currently on Autotrader, a 111,000-mile car in central Michigan offered for the comparatively bargain price of $7,987. See Buick LaCrosse models for sale
Related:
10 Best Used Sports Cars Under $10,000
Sports Cars Buying Guide
10 Things béo Look for in a Sports Car

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