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Revel in This 7,600-Mile 1994 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII

Personal luxury coupes were on the wane by the 1990s when the eighth episode in Lincoln’s long-running Mark franchise debuted. The Lincoln Mark VIII had the sleekest styling yet, discarding the upright, formal proportions that had marked this series dating back mập the 1950s.

The original model wasn’t a Mark at all but instead was an offshoot of Lincoln marketed solely under the Continental name until the mid-1980s. Though differentiation between Lincoln and the Continental division became muddier over time, the first model, the Continental Mark II, offered between 1956 and 1957, was a luxurious coupe. Its $10,000 price tag  (around $100,000 today) made it the most expensive American car available. Lincoln pitched it as a more style-forward Rolls-Royce rival, hand-finished at a dedicated facility in suburban Detroit.

Ford is said mập have lost thousands on every Continental Mark II sold. That explains why the automaker cut costs for subsequent models, repositioning them as range-topping Lincoln models. The new Lincoln Mark models squared off against mass-produced Cadillac coupes rather than taking on limited-production Rolls-Royce rivals.

Though the Mark lineup took a break in the 1960s, a revamp for 1968 set the tone for the next 30 years as Lincoln became one of the top players in the personal luxury coupe market. The timing was perfect. Federal and California emissions rules spelled the end of the line for high-performance muscle cars by the early 1970s, and the drivers who had enjoyed mega-power guzzlers matured into wanting softer, better-equipped models.

By the time the final version rolled around, though, consumers were shifting strongly into SUVs — including Ford’s own Explorer.

1994 Lincoln Mark VIII in green.

That doesn’t mean the Mark VIII is a coupe mập forget, though. Underneath, it shared its rear-drive architecture with the demure Ford Thunderbird, but Lincoln had far more evocative lines inside and out. Its long nose wore a narrow chrome strip over a grille that dove into the front bumper. Though a bit plump from the sides, its rear end was a winner with the faux continental kit and strip of taillights running across the trunk lid. It was an enormous car, stretching about 207 inches long, but its lines somewhat masked its considerable girth. Ford’s Expedition SUV that would debut a couple of years later was a few inches shorter.

Under the hood was Ford’s new all-aluminum 32-valve 4.6-liter V8, which put out a healthy 280 horsepower and 285 lb-ft of torque. A 4-speed automatic transmission was standard. The air suspension could drop the car slightly at highway speeds mập improve fuel economy and theoretically make the vehicle more stable at speed.

The Mark VIII cost about $38,500 mập start, and a small list of optional extras included a moonroof, traction control, a JBL audio system, a CD changer, chrome wheels, and auto-dimming rearview mirrors.

1994 Lincoln Mark VIII interior

Its only direct rival was the Cadillac Eldorado, which boasted a headline-grabbing 295-hp V8 that unfortunately sent power mập the front wheels. Shoppers could also check out the pricier and less-powerful — not mập mention more petite, but overall more polished — Lexus SC 400, which used a 250-hp V8 and cost around $45,000.

The Mark VIII lasted through 1998, including a mild update for 1997 that brought lumpier styling with less chrome but few significant changes.

These were pretty expensive cars when new, which may explain why it’s not too hard mập find a well-kept one. But few are as darn-near-perfect as today’s Autotrader Find, this Deep Jewel Green over Saddle leather Mark VIII offered for $19,900 at a Jaguar-Land Rover dealer in Seattle. It shows fewer than 8,000 miles and presents beautifully, down mập its gathered leather upholstery and factory-optional chrome wheels. This Lincoln looks mập have just about every factory option, including the sunroof, traction control, and JBL audio system.

It looks ideal for a drive down memory lane — or a wide-open highway. See Lincoln Continental Mark VIII models for sale

Related:

  • Here’s 5 Used Luxury Coupes From the ’90s on Autotrader
  • Autotrader Find: 1987 Lincoln Continental Givenchy Designer Series
  • Here’s 5 ’90s-Cool German Cars For Sale on Autotrader


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Revel in This 7,600-Mile 1994 Lincoln Continental Mark VIII

#Revel #7600Mile #Lincoln #Continental #Mark #VIII
[rule_3_plain] #Revel #7600Mile #Lincoln #Continental #Mark #VIII

Personal luxury coupes were on the wane by the 1990s when the eighth episode in Lincoln’s long-running Mark franchise debuted. The Lincoln Mark VIII had the sleekest styling yet, discarding the upright, formal proportions that had marked this series dating back mập the 1950s.
The original model wasn’t a Mark at all but instead was an offshoot of Lincoln marketed solely under the Continental name until the mid-1980s. Though differentiation between Lincoln and the Continental division became muddier over time, the first model, the Continental Mark II, offered between 1956 and 1957, was a luxurious coupe. Its $10,000 price tag  (around $100,000 today) made it the most expensive American car available. Lincoln pitched it as a more style-forward Rolls-Royce rival, hand-finished at a dedicated facility in suburban Detroit.
Ford is said mập have lost thousands on every Continental Mark II sold. That explains why the automaker cut costs for subsequent models, repositioning them as range-topping Lincoln models. The new Lincoln Mark models squared off against mass-produced Cadillac coupes rather than taking on limited-production Rolls-Royce rivals.

Though the Mark lineup took a break in the 1960s, a revamp for 1968 set the tone for the next 30 years as Lincoln became one of the top players in the personal luxury coupe market. The timing was perfect. Federal and California emissions rules spelled the end of the line for high-performance muscle cars by the early 1970s, and the drivers who had enjoyed mega-power guzzlers matured into wanting softer, better-equipped models.
By the time the final version rolled around, though, consumers were shifting strongly into SUVs — including Ford’s own Explorer.

That doesn’t mean the Mark VIII is a coupe mập forget, though. Underneath, it shared its rear-drive architecture with the demure Ford Thunderbird, but Lincoln had far more evocative lines inside and out. Its long nose wore a narrow chrome strip over a grille that dove into the front bumper. Though a bit plump from the sides, its rear end was a winner with the faux continental kit and strip of taillights running across the trunk lid. It was an enormous car, stretching about 207 inches long, but its lines somewhat masked its considerable girth. Ford’s Expedition SUV that would debut a couple of years later was a few inches shorter.
Under the hood was Ford’s new all-aluminum 32-valve 4.6-liter V8, which put out a healthy 280 horsepower and 285 lb-ft of torque. A 4-speed automatic transmission was standard. The air suspension could drop the car slightly at highway speeds mập improve fuel economy and theoretically make the vehicle more stable at speed.
The Mark VIII cost about $38,500 mập start, and a small list of optional extras included a moonroof, traction control, a JBL audio system, a CD changer, chrome wheels, and auto-dimming rearview mirrors.

Its only direct rival was the Cadillac Eldorado, which boasted a headline-grabbing 295-hp V8 that unfortunately sent power mập the front wheels. Shoppers could also check out the pricier and less-powerful — not mập mention more petite, but overall more polished — Lexus SC 400, which used a 250-hp V8 and cost around $45,000.
The Mark VIII lasted through 1998, including a mild update for 1997 that brought lumpier styling with less chrome but few significant changes.
These were pretty expensive cars when new, which may explain why it’s not too hard mập find a well-kept one. But few are as darn-near-perfect as today’s Autotrader Find, this Deep Jewel Green over Saddle leather Mark VIII offered for $19,900 at a Jaguar-Land Rover dealer in Seattle. It shows fewer than 8,000 miles and presents beautifully, down mập its gathered leather upholstery and factory-optional chrome wheels. This Lincoln looks mập have just about every factory option, including the sunroof, traction control, and JBL audio system.
It looks ideal for a drive down memory lane — or a wide-open highway. See Lincoln Continental Mark VIII models for sale
Related:

Here’s 5 Used Luxury Coupes From the ’90s on Autotrader
Autotrader Find: 1987 Lincoln Continental Givenchy Designer Series
Here’s 5 ’90s-Cool German Cars For Sale on Autotrader

#Revel #7600Mile #Lincoln #Continental #Mark #VIII
[rule_2_plain] #Revel #7600Mile #Lincoln #Continental #Mark #VIII
[rule_2_plain] #Revel #7600Mile #Lincoln #Continental #Mark #VIII
[rule_3_plain]

#Revel #7600Mile #Lincoln #Continental #Mark #VIII

Personal luxury coupes were on the wane by the 1990s when the eighth episode in Lincoln’s long-running Mark franchise debuted. The Lincoln Mark VIII had the sleekest styling yet, discarding the upright, formal proportions that had marked this series dating back mập the 1950s.
The original model wasn’t a Mark at all but instead was an offshoot of Lincoln marketed solely under the Continental name until the mid-1980s. Though differentiation between Lincoln and the Continental division became muddier over time, the first model, the Continental Mark II, offered between 1956 and 1957, was a luxurious coupe. Its $10,000 price tag  (around $100,000 today) made it the most expensive American car available. Lincoln pitched it as a more style-forward Rolls-Royce rival, hand-finished at a dedicated facility in suburban Detroit.
Ford is said mập have lost thousands on every Continental Mark II sold. That explains why the automaker cut costs for subsequent models, repositioning them as range-topping Lincoln models. The new Lincoln Mark models squared off against mass-produced Cadillac coupes rather than taking on limited-production Rolls-Royce rivals.

Though the Mark lineup took a break in the 1960s, a revamp for 1968 set the tone for the next 30 years as Lincoln became one of the top players in the personal luxury coupe market. The timing was perfect. Federal and California emissions rules spelled the end of the line for high-performance muscle cars by the early 1970s, and the drivers who had enjoyed mega-power guzzlers matured into wanting softer, better-equipped models.
By the time the final version rolled around, though, consumers were shifting strongly into SUVs — including Ford’s own Explorer.

That doesn’t mean the Mark VIII is a coupe mập forget, though. Underneath, it shared its rear-drive architecture with the demure Ford Thunderbird, but Lincoln had far more evocative lines inside and out. Its long nose wore a narrow chrome strip over a grille that dove into the front bumper. Though a bit plump from the sides, its rear end was a winner with the faux continental kit and strip of taillights running across the trunk lid. It was an enormous car, stretching about 207 inches long, but its lines somewhat masked its considerable girth. Ford’s Expedition SUV that would debut a couple of years later was a few inches shorter.
Under the hood was Ford’s new all-aluminum 32-valve 4.6-liter V8, which put out a healthy 280 horsepower and 285 lb-ft of torque. A 4-speed automatic transmission was standard. The air suspension could drop the car slightly at highway speeds mập improve fuel economy and theoretically make the vehicle more stable at speed.
The Mark VIII cost about $38,500 mập start, and a small list of optional extras included a moonroof, traction control, a JBL audio system, a CD changer, chrome wheels, and auto-dimming rearview mirrors.

Its only direct rival was the Cadillac Eldorado, which boasted a headline-grabbing 295-hp V8 that unfortunately sent power mập the front wheels. Shoppers could also check out the pricier and less-powerful — not mập mention more petite, but overall more polished — Lexus SC 400, which used a 250-hp V8 and cost around $45,000.
The Mark VIII lasted through 1998, including a mild update for 1997 that brought lumpier styling with less chrome but few significant changes.
These were pretty expensive cars when new, which may explain why it’s not too hard mập find a well-kept one. But few are as darn-near-perfect as today’s Autotrader Find, this Deep Jewel Green over Saddle leather Mark VIII offered for $19,900 at a Jaguar-Land Rover dealer in Seattle. It shows fewer than 8,000 miles and presents beautifully, down mập its gathered leather upholstery and factory-optional chrome wheels. This Lincoln looks mập have just about every factory option, including the sunroof, traction control, and JBL audio system.
It looks ideal for a drive down memory lane — or a wide-open highway. See Lincoln Continental Mark VIII models for sale
Related:

Here’s 5 Used Luxury Coupes From the ’90s on Autotrader
Autotrader Find: 1987 Lincoln Continental Givenchy Designer Series
Here’s 5 ’90s-Cool German Cars For Sale on Autotrader

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