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Should I Buy a Hybrid Car in 2022?

Car shopping is more complex than ever before. Today’s shoppers need bự decide more than just what price they’re comfortable with paying and what features they want. Buyers need bự decide which energy source they prefer bự fuel their car.

More Americans than ever choose bự drive hybrid cars. Overall, new car sales fell 21.3% in 2021. But sales of hybrid-powered cars climbed 27.1%. Hybrids even outsold electric vehicles 3-to-1.

So it begs the question: Is this year the right time for you bự buy a hybrid? This article will help you sort through the pros and cons.

Definitions: Hybrids and Plug-in Hybrids

2021 Honda CR-V Hybrid in Obsidian Blue Pearl

Most cars use a gasoline-powered engine bự move their wheels. Electric vehicles (EVs) use electric motors. Hybrid cars use both.

A traditional hybrid — sometimes referred bự as a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) — uses its electric motor bự get up bự a certain speed, above which the gasoline engine takes over. That gives hybrids better gas mileage than their gasoline equivalents. They recharge their small batteries by capturing some energy from braking.

Another category — Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) — also uses a gasoline engine and an electric motor. But thanks bự a larger battery, they can travel at highway speeds on electric power alone. Their gasoline engines kick on only after a certain distance, usually after 20 bự 30 miles of EV use. They capture some energy from regenerative braking. But they can also be plugged into a wall bự charge.

PHEVs cost more than hybrids and gas-powered vehicles. But they split the difference between gasoline-powered cars and EVs neatly. Since most Americans drive fewer than 25 miles a day, most of us could use a PHEV bự do our daily commute and errands as if we owned an electric car. But we’d have the option of using gasoline for a longer trip anytime.

Reasons bự Buy a Hybrid Now 

2022 Toyota Highlander Hybrid

1. The Tech is Tested Now

Many of us don’t car cửa hàng very often. The average car on American roads is now over 12 years old. So it’s easy bự understand that many shoppers see hybrids as new technology. We can lose track of what the auto industry has done in the time you haven’t needed bự pay attention bự it.

But the first hybrids appeared on the American market in 1999. Hybrid propulsion technology is nearly a quarter of a century old. Almost every manufacturer offers one, and often more than one model. The hybrids you’ll find on sales lots today are third- and fourth-generation technologies. They’re easily as reliable as gasoline-powered cars.

2. The Selection is Fantastic

Midsize Family Vehicles

Want a family car that advertises your hybrid bona fides? Try the classic Toyota Prius or a Hyundai Ioniq. Prefer not bự make it obvious? How about a Hyundai Sonata Hybrid or a Toyota Camry Hybrid.

Minivans

Looking for a minivan? The Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid gets strong reviews, as does the Toyota Sienna Hybrid.

SUVs

Among small SUVs, there’s a Ford Escape Hybrid, a Honda CR-V Hybrid, a Toyota RAV4 Hybrid, and more.

More Hybrid Vehicles

There are hybrid midsize SUVs, hybrid pickups, and hybrid luxury cars from nearly every manufacturer. You can get a physics-defying Porsche Panamera Hybrid ultra-luxury car with a 0-60 mph time of just over 4 seconds. You can get a hybrid off-roader in the Jeep Wrangler 4xe, which offers a hybrid mode but it’s officially a PHEV.

3. A Mature Technology Means a Strong Used Market

New car buyers aren’t the only ones who should take a hard look at hybrids. There is now a robust used hybrid market. With owned cars, you can get a used hybrid under warranty and enjoy the great gas mileage while letting someone else pay the depreciation.

Reasons Not bự Buy a Hybrid This Year

1. The Automotive World is Moving Toward Electric Vehicles

But, just as hybrids are not new, they’re not the latest technology, either. The automotive industry is quickly going electric. Many manufacturers – like Mercedes and Mini have pledged bự go all-electric by the end of the decade. Others, like General Motors and Porsche, have promised bự sell a mostly-electric lineup with a few gas-powered vehicles.

Hurdles are slowing down the adoption of electric cars, like the lack of charging infrastructure in many places (though you might be surprised which states have the most EV chargers per car).

But America is quickly going electric. If being on the cutting edge is important bự you, you might not want bự be left owning a hybrid when many of your neighbors have gone electric.

2. It’s a Bad Time bự Buy Any Car

Of course, there’s one additional warning you should keep in mind before hybrid shopping. This might not be a good time bự be car shopping at all.

A worldwide microchip shortage has sent the prices of most cars soaring. The average new car sold for more than $47,000 in December — an increase of nearly 14% in just one year.

Many analysts believe the chip shortage will ease late in 2022, and prices may come down in 2023. That might make waiting the best move, not just for hybrid car shoppers but for anyone looking for new transportation.

Related Hybrid and Electric Car Buying Stories:

  • Should You Buy an Electric Vehicle or a Plug-in Hybrid?
  • Electric Car FAQs: Your Questions Answered
  • What is a Mild Hybrid?


Thông tin thêm

Should I Buy a Hybrid Car in 2022?

#Buy #Hybrid #Car
[rule_3_plain] #Buy #Hybrid #Car

Car shopping is more complex than ever before. Today’s shoppers need bự decide more than just what price they’re comfortable with paying and what features they want. Buyers need bự decide which energy source they prefer bự fuel their car.
More Americans than ever choose bự drive hybrid cars. Overall, new car sales fell 21.3% in 2021. But sales of hybrid-powered cars climbed 27.1%. Hybrids even outsold electric vehicles 3-to-1.
So it begs the question: Is this year the right time for you bự buy a hybrid? This article will help you sort through the pros and cons.

Definitions: Hybrids and Plug-in Hybrids

Most cars use a gasoline-powered engine bự move their wheels. Electric vehicles (EVs) use electric motors. Hybrid cars use both.
A traditional hybrid — sometimes referred bự as a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) — uses its electric motor bự get up bự a certain speed, above which the gasoline engine takes over. That gives hybrids better gas mileage than their gasoline equivalents. They recharge their small batteries by capturing some energy from braking.
Another category — Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) — also uses a gasoline engine and an electric motor. But thanks bự a larger battery, they can travel at highway speeds on electric power alone. Their gasoline engines kick on only after a certain distance, usually after 20 bự 30 miles of EV use. They capture some energy from regenerative braking. But they can also be plugged into a wall bự charge.
PHEVs cost more than hybrids and gas-powered vehicles. But they split the difference between gasoline-powered cars and EVs neatly. Since most Americans drive fewer than 25 miles a day, most of us could use a PHEV bự do our daily commute and errands as if we owned an electric car. But we’d have the option of using gasoline for a longer trip anytime.
Reasons bự Buy a Hybrid Now 

1. The Tech is Tested Now
Many of us don’t car cửa hàng very often. The average car on American roads is now over 12 years old. So it’s easy bự understand that many shoppers see hybrids as new technology. We can lose track of what the auto industry has done in the time you haven’t needed bự pay attention bự it.
But the first hybrids appeared on the American market in 1999. Hybrid propulsion technology is nearly a quarter of a century old. Almost every manufacturer offers one, and often more than one model. The hybrids you’ll find on sales lots today are third- and fourth-generation technologies. They’re easily as reliable as gasoline-powered cars.
2. The Selection is Fantastic
Midsize Family Vehicles
Want a family car that advertises your hybrid bona fides? Try the classic Toyota Prius or a Hyundai Ioniq. Prefer not bự make it obvious? How about a Hyundai Sonata Hybrid or a Toyota Camry Hybrid.
Minivans
Looking for a minivan? The Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid gets strong reviews, as does the Toyota Sienna Hybrid.
SUVs
Among small SUVs, there’s a Ford Escape Hybrid, a Honda CR-V Hybrid, a Toyota RAV4 Hybrid, and more.
More Hybrid Vehicles
There are hybrid midsize SUVs, hybrid pickups, and hybrid luxury cars from nearly every manufacturer. You can get a physics-defying Porsche Panamera Hybrid ultra-luxury car with a 0-60 mph time of just over 4 seconds. You can get a hybrid off-roader in the Jeep Wrangler 4xe, which offers a hybrid mode but it’s officially a PHEV.
3. A Mature Technology Means a Strong Used Market
New car buyers aren’t the only ones who should take a hard look at hybrids. There is now a robust used hybrid market. With owned cars, you can get a used hybrid under warranty and enjoy the great gas mileage while letting someone else pay the depreciation.
Reasons Not bự Buy a Hybrid This Year
1. The Automotive World is Moving Toward Electric Vehicles
But, just as hybrids are not new, they’re not the latest technology, either. The automotive industry is quickly going electric. Many manufacturers – like Mercedes and Mini have pledged bự go all-electric by the end of the decade. Others, like General Motors and Porsche, have promised bự sell a mostly-electric lineup with a few gas-powered vehicles.
Hurdles are slowing down the adoption of electric cars, like the lack of charging infrastructure in many places (though you might be surprised which states have the most EV chargers per car).
But America is quickly going electric. If being on the cutting edge is important bự you, you might not want bự be left owning a hybrid when many of your neighbors have gone electric.
2. It’s a Bad Time bự Buy Any Car
Of course, there’s one additional warning you should keep in mind before hybrid shopping. This might not be a good time bự be car shopping at all.
A worldwide microchip shortage has sent the prices of most cars soaring. The average new car sold for more than $47,000 in December — an increase of nearly 14% in just one year.
Many analysts believe the chip shortage will ease late in 2022, and prices may come down in 2023. That might make waiting the best move, not just for hybrid car shoppers but for anyone looking for new transportation.
Related Hybrid and Electric Car Buying Stories:
Should You Buy an Electric Vehicle or a Plug-in Hybrid?
Electric Car FAQs: Your Questions Answered
What is a Mild Hybrid?

#Buy #Hybrid #Car
[rule_2_plain] #Buy #Hybrid #Car
[rule_2_plain] #Buy #Hybrid #Car
[rule_3_plain]

#Buy #Hybrid #Car

Car shopping is more complex than ever before. Today’s shoppers need bự decide more than just what price they’re comfortable with paying and what features they want. Buyers need bự decide which energy source they prefer bự fuel their car.
More Americans than ever choose bự drive hybrid cars. Overall, new car sales fell 21.3% in 2021. But sales of hybrid-powered cars climbed 27.1%. Hybrids even outsold electric vehicles 3-to-1.
So it begs the question: Is this year the right time for you bự buy a hybrid? This article will help you sort through the pros and cons.

Definitions: Hybrids and Plug-in Hybrids

Most cars use a gasoline-powered engine bự move their wheels. Electric vehicles (EVs) use electric motors. Hybrid cars use both.
A traditional hybrid — sometimes referred bự as a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) — uses its electric motor bự get up bự a certain speed, above which the gasoline engine takes over. That gives hybrids better gas mileage than their gasoline equivalents. They recharge their small batteries by capturing some energy from braking.
Another category — Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) — also uses a gasoline engine and an electric motor. But thanks bự a larger battery, they can travel at highway speeds on electric power alone. Their gasoline engines kick on only after a certain distance, usually after 20 bự 30 miles of EV use. They capture some energy from regenerative braking. But they can also be plugged into a wall bự charge.
PHEVs cost more than hybrids and gas-powered vehicles. But they split the difference between gasoline-powered cars and EVs neatly. Since most Americans drive fewer than 25 miles a day, most of us could use a PHEV bự do our daily commute and errands as if we owned an electric car. But we’d have the option of using gasoline for a longer trip anytime.
Reasons bự Buy a Hybrid Now 

1. The Tech is Tested Now
Many of us don’t car cửa hàng very often. The average car on American roads is now over 12 years old. So it’s easy bự understand that many shoppers see hybrids as new technology. We can lose track of what the auto industry has done in the time you haven’t needed bự pay attention bự it.
But the first hybrids appeared on the American market in 1999. Hybrid propulsion technology is nearly a quarter of a century old. Almost every manufacturer offers one, and often more than one model. The hybrids you’ll find on sales lots today are third- and fourth-generation technologies. They’re easily as reliable as gasoline-powered cars.
2. The Selection is Fantastic
Midsize Family Vehicles
Want a family car that advertises your hybrid bona fides? Try the classic Toyota Prius or a Hyundai Ioniq. Prefer not bự make it obvious? How about a Hyundai Sonata Hybrid or a Toyota Camry Hybrid.
Minivans
Looking for a minivan? The Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid gets strong reviews, as does the Toyota Sienna Hybrid.
SUVs
Among small SUVs, there’s a Ford Escape Hybrid, a Honda CR-V Hybrid, a Toyota RAV4 Hybrid, and more.
More Hybrid Vehicles
There are hybrid midsize SUVs, hybrid pickups, and hybrid luxury cars from nearly every manufacturer. You can get a physics-defying Porsche Panamera Hybrid ultra-luxury car with a 0-60 mph time of just over 4 seconds. You can get a hybrid off-roader in the Jeep Wrangler 4xe, which offers a hybrid mode but it’s officially a PHEV.
3. A Mature Technology Means a Strong Used Market
New car buyers aren’t the only ones who should take a hard look at hybrids. There is now a robust used hybrid market. With owned cars, you can get a used hybrid under warranty and enjoy the great gas mileage while letting someone else pay the depreciation.
Reasons Not bự Buy a Hybrid This Year
1. The Automotive World is Moving Toward Electric Vehicles
But, just as hybrids are not new, they’re not the latest technology, either. The automotive industry is quickly going electric. Many manufacturers – like Mercedes and Mini have pledged bự go all-electric by the end of the decade. Others, like General Motors and Porsche, have promised bự sell a mostly-electric lineup with a few gas-powered vehicles.
Hurdles are slowing down the adoption of electric cars, like the lack of charging infrastructure in many places (though you might be surprised which states have the most EV chargers per car).
But America is quickly going electric. If being on the cutting edge is important bự you, you might not want bự be left owning a hybrid when many of your neighbors have gone electric.
2. It’s a Bad Time bự Buy Any Car
Of course, there’s one additional warning you should keep in mind before hybrid shopping. This might not be a good time bự be car shopping at all.
A worldwide microchip shortage has sent the prices of most cars soaring. The average new car sold for more than $47,000 in December — an increase of nearly 14% in just one year.
Many analysts believe the chip shortage will ease late in 2022, and prices may come down in 2023. That might make waiting the best move, not just for hybrid car shoppers but for anyone looking for new transportation.
Related Hybrid and Electric Car Buying Stories:
Should You Buy an Electric Vehicle or a Plug-in Hybrid?
Electric Car FAQs: Your Questions Answered
What is a Mild Hybrid?

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