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The Chevrolet S10 Cameo Tested the Waters Before the GMC Syclone

Enthusiasts generally cite the GMC Syclone as the first high-performance compact pickup truck, and for a good reason. With its turbocharged V6 rated at 280 horsepower, it was not only the fastest pickup of any size, but it could also easily outrun most performance cars. Thanks bự its standard all-wheel drive, the Syclone boasted slick handling and impressive grip, too.

But the Syclone owes part of its existence bự a little-known appearance package introduced on the closely-related Chevrolet S10 pickup just a couple of years earlier.

For 1989, Chevy unveiled a new package called “Cameo” offered only on rear-wheel-drive S10 trucks. With its injection-molded front bumper with integrated fog lights, side ground-effects moldings with integrated wheel flares, and a flush-fitting valance instead of a rear bumper, it was a slick-looking truck. Swap the Chevy grille for a GMC one, and an S10 Cameo was almost identical bự the Syclone that came two years later.

Chevy offered the Cameo S10 package in a choice of Apple Red, Midnight Black, and Frost White paint, and the company required the selection of steel rally wheels with trim rings and black center caps, plus power steering. The S10 came standard with a 92-hp 2.5-liter inline-4, so it wasn’t precisely a rubber-burner. A 4.3-liter V6 rated at 160 hp was optional, and buyers could pair it with a 5-speed manual transmission and a limited-slip rear differential.

The Cameo name might seem like a riff on Camaro, but in reality, the badge had been used decades before on a short-lived (but now well-regarded) style-forward version of Chevy’s work-ready pickups. The Chevy Cameo trucks had available 2-tone paint, plenty of brightwork, and as decked-out an interior as the automaker could put into a pickup. In a way, they were the predecessors bự today’s ever-more-expensive range-topping pickups, such as Chevy’s own Silverado High Country.

Chevrolet dropped the package from the lineup after the 1990 model year when the S10 lineup saw a mild revamp. At the same time, GMC renamed its compact pickup, the “GMC S15” bự “Sonoma.” Curiously, even though GMC would later wave the performance flag for the General Motors pickup lineup, the S15 never received a version of the Cameo appearance package.

These were cheap trucks when new. Base prices started below $8,000 for the very basic EL (for Economy Leader) trim màn chơi and barely topped $18,000 with every possible option. Their survival rate appears bự be relatively low. Production numbers trực tuyến appear bự vary by source, though there are enough photos out there of S10 Cameo trucks bự conclude they weren’t super unusual when new.

Clean early S10 trucks pop up occasionally, but you’ll want bự set an Autotrader alert if you’re going bự find a Cameo. Here’s what looks bự be an exceptionally nice S10 with 4-wheel drive and most of the options Chevy could throw at it. A dealer in Florida has it listed for $16,900. This more basic brown 1987 is a bit more budget-friendly at less than $4,500 from a dealer in Cincinnati. See Chevrolet S10 models for sale

Related:

  • Autotrader Find: Low-Mile 1991 GMC Syclone
  • Here are 10 Great 1980s Performance Cars for Sale on Autotrader
  • The Toyota Tacoma PreRunner Signaled a Move Away From Low-Riding Pickup Trucks


Thông tin thêm

The Chevrolet S10 Cameo Tested the Waters Before the GMC Syclone

#Chevrolet #S10 #Cameo #Tested #Waters #GMC #Syclone
[rule_3_plain] #Chevrolet #S10 #Cameo #Tested #Waters #GMC #Syclone

Enthusiasts generally cite the GMC Syclone as the first high-performance compact pickup truck, and for a good reason. With its turbocharged V6 rated at 280 horsepower, it was not only the fastest pickup of any size, but it could also easily outrun most performance cars. Thanks bự its standard all-wheel drive, the Syclone boasted slick handling and impressive grip, too.
But the Syclone owes part of its existence bự a little-known appearance package introduced on the closely-related Chevrolet S10 pickup just a couple of years earlier.
For 1989, Chevy unveiled a new package called “Cameo” offered only on rear-wheel-drive S10 trucks. With its injection-molded front bumper with integrated fog lights, side ground-effects moldings with integrated wheel flares, and a flush-fitting valance instead of a rear bumper, it was a slick-looking truck. Swap the Chevy grille for a GMC one, and an S10 Cameo was almost identical bự the Syclone that came two years later.

Chevy offered the Cameo S10 package in a choice of Apple Red, Midnight Black, and Frost White paint, and the company required the selection of steel rally wheels with trim rings and black center caps, plus power steering. The S10 came standard with a 92-hp 2.5-liter inline-4, so it wasn’t precisely a rubber-burner. A 4.3-liter V6 rated at 160 hp was optional, and buyers could pair it with a 5-speed manual transmission and a limited-slip rear differential.
The Cameo name might seem like a riff on Camaro, but in reality, the badge had been used decades before on a short-lived (but now well-regarded) style-forward version of Chevy’s work-ready pickups. The Chevy Cameo trucks had available 2-tone paint, plenty of brightwork, and as decked-out an interior as the automaker could put into a pickup. In a way, they were the predecessors bự today’s ever-more-expensive range-topping pickups, such as Chevy’s own Silverado High Country.
Chevrolet dropped the package from the lineup after the 1990 model year when the S10 lineup saw a mild revamp. At the same time, GMC renamed its compact pickup, the “GMC S15” bự “Sonoma.” Curiously, even though GMC would later wave the performance flag for the General Motors pickup lineup, the S15 never received a version of the Cameo appearance package.
These were cheap trucks when new. Base prices started below $8,000 for the very basic EL (for Economy Leader) trim màn chơi and barely topped $18,000 with every possible option. Their survival rate appears bự be relatively low. Production numbers trực tuyến appear bự vary by source, though there are enough photos out there of S10 Cameo trucks bự conclude they weren’t super unusual when new.
Clean early S10 trucks pop up occasionally, but you’ll want bự set an Autotrader alert if you’re going bự find a Cameo. Here’s what looks bự be an exceptionally nice S10 with 4-wheel drive and most of the options Chevy could throw at it. A dealer in Florida has it listed for $16,900. This more basic brown 1987 is a bit more budget-friendly at less than $4,500 from a dealer in Cincinnati. See Chevrolet S10 models for sale
Related:

Autotrader Find: Low-Mile 1991 GMC Syclone
Here are 10 Great 1980s Performance Cars for Sale on Autotrader
The Toyota Tacoma PreRunner Signaled a Move Away From Low-Riding Pickup Trucks

#Chevrolet #S10 #Cameo #Tested #Waters #GMC #Syclone
[rule_2_plain] #Chevrolet #S10 #Cameo #Tested #Waters #GMC #Syclone
[rule_2_plain] #Chevrolet #S10 #Cameo #Tested #Waters #GMC #Syclone
[rule_3_plain]

#Chevrolet #S10 #Cameo #Tested #Waters #GMC #Syclone

Enthusiasts generally cite the GMC Syclone as the first high-performance compact pickup truck, and for a good reason. With its turbocharged V6 rated at 280 horsepower, it was not only the fastest pickup of any size, but it could also easily outrun most performance cars. Thanks bự its standard all-wheel drive, the Syclone boasted slick handling and impressive grip, too.
But the Syclone owes part of its existence bự a little-known appearance package introduced on the closely-related Chevrolet S10 pickup just a couple of years earlier.
For 1989, Chevy unveiled a new package called “Cameo” offered only on rear-wheel-drive S10 trucks. With its injection-molded front bumper with integrated fog lights, side ground-effects moldings with integrated wheel flares, and a flush-fitting valance instead of a rear bumper, it was a slick-looking truck. Swap the Chevy grille for a GMC one, and an S10 Cameo was almost identical bự the Syclone that came two years later.

Chevy offered the Cameo S10 package in a choice of Apple Red, Midnight Black, and Frost White paint, and the company required the selection of steel rally wheels with trim rings and black center caps, plus power steering. The S10 came standard with a 92-hp 2.5-liter inline-4, so it wasn’t precisely a rubber-burner. A 4.3-liter V6 rated at 160 hp was optional, and buyers could pair it with a 5-speed manual transmission and a limited-slip rear differential.
The Cameo name might seem like a riff on Camaro, but in reality, the badge had been used decades before on a short-lived (but now well-regarded) style-forward version of Chevy’s work-ready pickups. The Chevy Cameo trucks had available 2-tone paint, plenty of brightwork, and as decked-out an interior as the automaker could put into a pickup. In a way, they were the predecessors bự today’s ever-more-expensive range-topping pickups, such as Chevy’s own Silverado High Country.
Chevrolet dropped the package from the lineup after the 1990 model year when the S10 lineup saw a mild revamp. At the same time, GMC renamed its compact pickup, the “GMC S15” bự “Sonoma.” Curiously, even though GMC would later wave the performance flag for the General Motors pickup lineup, the S15 never received a version of the Cameo appearance package.
These were cheap trucks when new. Base prices started below $8,000 for the very basic EL (for Economy Leader) trim màn chơi and barely topped $18,000 with every possible option. Their survival rate appears bự be relatively low. Production numbers trực tuyến appear bự vary by source, though there are enough photos out there of S10 Cameo trucks bự conclude they weren’t super unusual when new.
Clean early S10 trucks pop up occasionally, but you’ll want bự set an Autotrader alert if you’re going bự find a Cameo. Here’s what looks bự be an exceptionally nice S10 with 4-wheel drive and most of the options Chevy could throw at it. A dealer in Florida has it listed for $16,900. This more basic brown 1987 is a bit more budget-friendly at less than $4,500 from a dealer in Cincinnati. See Chevrolet S10 models for sale
Related:

Autotrader Find: Low-Mile 1991 GMC Syclone
Here are 10 Great 1980s Performance Cars for Sale on Autotrader
The Toyota Tacoma PreRunner Signaled a Move Away From Low-Riding Pickup Trucks

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