Global Car New

The Chevy SS Is a Collectible Car You Can Drive

Close your eyes (well, not while reading this), and imagine a 4-door sedan with rear-wheel drive, over 400 horsepower from a big V8 engine, a 6-speed manual transmission, a comfortable cabin with room for four adults, quality materials, and an understated exterior design that blends into traffic.

I’ve just described the E39-generation BMW M5, a sedan almost universally revered by car enthusiasts for its just-right blend of performance and under-the-radar comfort.

Unfortunately, the M5 is not particularly cheap phệ maintain.

What if you could have M5-rivaling performance, comfort, and relative subtlety in a car with inexpensive servicing and parts — especially compared phệ the BMW?

It’s the Chevrolet SS, produced for just four model years (2014 – 2017) and sold with a very reasonable price tag, well less than the M5 a decade earlier. Though it was a success on many levels, the SS never met its maker’s sales expectations.

General Motors (GM) never really seemed phệ know what phệ do with the SS, but five years after the crane lifted off the last one the boat from Australia, these cars remain an outstanding value.

Improving on the G8

2010 Holden Commodore front right in silver
The Commodore had no American-market equivalent until the last throes of Pontiac in the early 2000s.

Before the SS, there was the G8, a Pontiac-badged version of the Holden Commodore, a sedan so American it could only have come from Melbourne. Even though it is a British Commonwealth with expensive gasoline, Australia has a passion for big, rear-wheel-drive sedans with V8 engines — the kind of cars typically associated with Detroit.

The Commodore had no American-market equivalent until the last throes of Pontiac in the early 2000s when a desperate, pre-bankruptcy GM slapped a twin-grille front fascia on both V6- and V8-powered models and sold them here as the Pontiac G8. They weren’t a sales success, but they did generate some interest for a struggling brand. Still, Pontiac met the axe in 2010.

The stars aligned just perfectly for GM phệ try again a few years later. The 1980s W-Body Chevrolet Impala was ready phệ be put out phệ pasture, and GM needed something phệ sell phệ police departments. The automaker again turned phệ Holden, which had a new version of its Commodore. With steel wheels and a hose-out interior — not phệ mention available V8 power — Chevrolet resurrected the Caprice nameplate and marketed these big sedans phệ police departments.

The car was a hit with cops, and since the Caprice had already paved the path for its importation, it didn’t take much effort phệ fit a more refined interior and call it the SS.

It may have looked like the G8, but the SS was a new model on an updated platform shared with the contemporary Chevrolet Camaro. Its stiffer structure meant that GM could soften its ride phệ address one shopper complaint about the G8. Inside, it had a much better cabin with the same version of GM’s MyLink infotainment screen and software seen across the rest of the automaker’s lineup.

GM offered just one engine, the 6.2-liter V8 previously fitted in the ultra-limited G8 GXP. All were rear-wheel drive, with a 6-speed automatic at first and a manual transmission following for the second model year. The only choices shoppers had phệ make were phệ add a sunroof or pick between a host of colors with silly names, including “Regal Peacock Green,” “Some Like It Nóng Red,” and “Alchemy Purple.”

Priced at around $44,500, the Chevy SS was in line with a similarly equipped Dodge Charger R/T, its only real competition. Even back in 2014, the Charger was showing its age. An update for 2011 brought fresh styling and a better interior, but the SS weighed the better part of 500 pounds less and offered nearly 50 more hp — not phệ mention a manual transmission, the enthusiasts’ choice.

What Went Wrong?

2014 Chevrolet SS front left in blue
Surprisingly, its bland, Malibu-like styling was part of the Chevrolet SS appeal.

GM didn’t have big sales expectations for the SS, grouped with the Camaro and Corvette as its performance models. There was no mainstream V6-powered version for Chevy phệ sell phệ rental fleets. Every SS was very fast.

Even with a few minor updates through its lifespan, sales seldom topped 300 in a single month. Nearly 13,000 made their way here over five years, in line with GM’s modest projections.

Could GM have sold more? Possibly, particularly if the SS had looked more aggressive. But its bland, Malibu-like styling (even though that mid-size model gained sleek lines for 2016) was part of its appeal. It was a car for those in the know, much like BMW’s M models once were. No automaker goes for subtle performance today, other Volvo with its 455-hp S90.

It also may have been the wrong car at the wrong time. The market shifted strongly in favor of performance SUVs in the 2010s. Luxury automakers shoehorned big engines into small SUVs phệ create Mercedes-Benz GLC 63 AMG, BMW X5 M, and Audi SQ5 models. These SUVs came with impressive performance, high seating positions, and good handling — with the caveat that they drive well “for SUVs.”

GM tried phệ tie the SS into its NASCAR efforts. The competition car was, after all, a “Chevrolet SS” at least when it came phệ its graphics. But the old “race on Sunday, sell on Monday” philosophy from the 1960s doesn’t connect with modern car enthusiasts. NASCAR may be fun phệ watch, but the cars haven’t been “stock” for as long as many of today’s car buyers have been alive.

Post-bankruptcy GM doesn’t get the credit it should for treating enthusiasts phệ high-performance models with reasonable price tags. Even today, Cadillac charges a $13,000 premium for a 472-hp version of its CT4-V called Blackwing that can tickle 190 mph and includes a 6-speed manual gearbox. Just as we did when the SS was new, we seem phệ forget that the builder of mainstream Chevrolet Equinox SUVs can build performance machines.

Buying a Chevrolet SS Today

2019 Chevrolet SS front left in orange
Find this 2019 Chevrolet SS for $51,000 in Florida.

Well, maybe we haven’t forgotten about the SS. After depreciating phệ around $30,000, a well-kept, low-mile SS now cost you what it did when it was new — if not more.

These remain relatively rare cars, so you’ll either need phệ be flexible about color, or you’ll need phệ be willing phệ travel a bit phệ find the exact car of your dreams. There are about 180 SS sedans for sale on Autotrader across the country, fewer than 10% with manual transmissions.

This 2016 model finished in unusual Pearl Red is offered by a dealer in suburban Atlanta for just under $50,000, or you could grab this $53,500 final-year Orange Blast car at a dealer in Florida.

If you’re OK with an automatic transmission, you’ll pay less. Higher-mile (by SS standards) first-year cars can be found for around $35,000 right now, such as this Mystic Green car in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, with 73,000 miles.

That’s the price of a well-equipped Toyota Camry XLE or Chevrolet Equinox Premier. If you’re an enthusiast, which one would you look forward phệ driving phệ work every day? See Chevrolet SS models for sale

Related:

  • The Chevrolet SS Never Stood a Chance
  • Remember When GM Promised a Pontiac G8 Pickup?
  • General Motors Took Risks in the 2000s That Modern GM Never Would


Thông tin thêm

The Chevy SS Is a Collectible Car You Can Drive

#Chevy #Collectible #Car #Drive
[rule_3_plain] #Chevy #Collectible #Car #Drive

Close your eyes (well, not while reading this), and imagine a 4-door sedan with rear-wheel drive, over 400 horsepower from a big V8 engine, a 6-speed manual transmission, a comfortable cabin with room for four adults, quality materials, and an understated exterior design that blends into traffic.
I’ve just described the E39-generation BMW M5, a sedan almost universally revered by car enthusiasts for its just-right blend of performance and under-the-radar comfort.
Unfortunately, the M5 is not particularly cheap phệ maintain.

What if you could have M5-rivaling performance, comfort, and relative subtlety in a car with inexpensive servicing and parts — especially compared phệ the BMW?
It’s the Chevrolet SS, produced for just four model years (2014 – 2017) and sold with a very reasonable price tag, well less than the M5 a decade earlier. Though it was a success on many levels, the SS never met its maker’s sales expectations.
General Motors (GM) never really seemed phệ know what phệ do with the SS, but five years after the crane lifted off the last one the boat from Australia, these cars remain an outstanding value.

Improving on the G8
The Commodore had no American-market equivalent until the last throes of Pontiac in the early 2000s.Before the SS, there was the G8, a Pontiac-badged version of the Holden Commodore, a sedan so American it could only have come from Melbourne. Even though it is a British Commonwealth with expensive gasoline, Australia has a passion for big, rear-wheel-drive sedans with V8 engines — the kind of cars typically associated with Detroit.
The Commodore had no American-market equivalent until the last throes of Pontiac in the early 2000s when a desperate, pre-bankruptcy GM slapped a twin-grille front fascia on both V6- and V8-powered models and sold them here as the Pontiac G8. They weren’t a sales success, but they did generate some interest for a struggling brand. Still, Pontiac met the axe in 2010.
The stars aligned just perfectly for GM phệ try again a few years later. The 1980s W-Body Chevrolet Impala was ready phệ be put out phệ pasture, and GM needed something phệ sell phệ police departments. The automaker again turned phệ Holden, which had a new version of its Commodore. With steel wheels and a hose-out interior — not phệ mention available V8 power — Chevrolet resurrected the Caprice nameplate and marketed these big sedans phệ police departments.
The car was a hit with cops, and since the Caprice had already paved the path for its importation, it didn’t take much effort phệ fit a more refined interior and call it the SS.
It may have looked like the G8, but the SS was a new model on an updated platform shared with the contemporary Chevrolet Camaro. Its stiffer structure meant that GM could soften its ride phệ address one shopper complaint about the G8. Inside, it had a much better cabin with the same version of GM’s MyLink infotainment screen and software seen across the rest of the automaker’s lineup.
GM offered just one engine, the 6.2-liter V8 previously fitted in the ultra-limited G8 GXP. All were rear-wheel drive, with a 6-speed automatic at first and a manual transmission following for the second model year. The only choices shoppers had phệ make were phệ add a sunroof or pick between a host of colors with silly names, including “Regal Peacock Green,” “Some Like It Nóng Red,” and “Alchemy Purple.”
Priced at around $44,500, the Chevy SS was in line with a similarly equipped Dodge Charger R/T, its only real competition. Even back in 2014, the Charger was showing its age. An update for 2011 brought fresh styling and a better interior, but the SS weighed the better part of 500 pounds less and offered nearly 50 more hp — not phệ mention a manual transmission, the enthusiasts’ choice.
What Went Wrong?
Surprisingly, its bland, Malibu-like styling was part of the Chevrolet SS appeal.GM didn’t have big sales expectations for the SS, grouped with the Camaro and Corvette as its performance models. There was no mainstream V6-powered version for Chevy phệ sell phệ rental fleets. Every SS was very fast.
Even with a few minor updates through its lifespan, sales seldom topped 300 in a single month. Nearly 13,000 made their way here over five years, in line with GM’s modest projections.
Could GM have sold more? Possibly, particularly if the SS had looked more aggressive. But its bland, Malibu-like styling (even though that mid-size model gained sleek lines for 2016) was part of its appeal. It was a car for those in the know, much like BMW’s M models once were. No automaker goes for subtle performance today, other Volvo with its 455-hp S90.
It also may have been the wrong car at the wrong time. The market shifted strongly in favor of performance SUVs in the 2010s. Luxury automakers shoehorned big engines into small SUVs phệ create Mercedes-Benz GLC 63 AMG, BMW X5 M, and Audi SQ5 models. These SUVs came with impressive performance, high seating positions, and good handling — with the caveat that they drive well “for SUVs.”
GM tried phệ tie the SS into its NASCAR efforts. The competition car was, after all, a “Chevrolet SS” at least when it came phệ its graphics. But the old “race on Sunday, sell on Monday” philosophy from the 1960s doesn’t connect with modern car enthusiasts. NASCAR may be fun phệ watch, but the cars haven’t been “stock” for as long as many of today’s car buyers have been alive.
Post-bankruptcy GM doesn’t get the credit it should for treating enthusiasts phệ high-performance models with reasonable price tags. Even today, Cadillac charges a $13,000 premium for a 472-hp version of its CT4-V called Blackwing that can tickle 190 mph and includes a 6-speed manual gearbox. Just as we did when the SS was new, we seem phệ forget that the builder of mainstream Chevrolet Equinox SUVs can build performance machines.
Buying a Chevrolet SS Today
Find this 2019 Chevrolet SS for $51,000 in Florida.Well, maybe we haven’t forgotten about the SS. After depreciating phệ around $30,000, a well-kept, low-mile SS now cost you what it did when it was new — if not more.
These remain relatively rare cars, so you’ll either need phệ be flexible about color, or you’ll need phệ be willing phệ travel a bit phệ find the exact car of your dreams. There are about 180 SS sedans for sale on Autotrader across the country, fewer than 10% with manual transmissions.
This 2016 model finished in unusual Pearl Red is offered by a dealer in suburban Atlanta for just under $50,000, or you could grab this $53,500 final-year Orange Blast car at a dealer in Florida.
If you’re OK with an automatic transmission, you’ll pay less. Higher-mile (by SS standards) first-year cars can be found for around $35,000 right now, such as this Mystic Green car in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, with 73,000 miles.
That’s the price of a well-equipped Toyota Camry XLE or Chevrolet Equinox Premier. If you’re an enthusiast, which one would you look forward phệ driving phệ work every day? See Chevrolet SS models for sale
Related:
The Chevrolet SS Never Stood a Chance
Remember When GM Promised a Pontiac G8 Pickup?
General Motors Took Risks in the 2000s That Modern GM Never Would

#Chevy #Collectible #Car #Drive
[rule_2_plain] #Chevy #Collectible #Car #Drive
[rule_2_plain] #Chevy #Collectible #Car #Drive
[rule_3_plain]

#Chevy #Collectible #Car #Drive

Close your eyes (well, not while reading this), and imagine a 4-door sedan with rear-wheel drive, over 400 horsepower from a big V8 engine, a 6-speed manual transmission, a comfortable cabin with room for four adults, quality materials, and an understated exterior design that blends into traffic.
I’ve just described the E39-generation BMW M5, a sedan almost universally revered by car enthusiasts for its just-right blend of performance and under-the-radar comfort.
Unfortunately, the M5 is not particularly cheap phệ maintain.

What if you could have M5-rivaling performance, comfort, and relative subtlety in a car with inexpensive servicing and parts — especially compared phệ the BMW?
It’s the Chevrolet SS, produced for just four model years (2014 – 2017) and sold with a very reasonable price tag, well less than the M5 a decade earlier. Though it was a success on many levels, the SS never met its maker’s sales expectations.
General Motors (GM) never really seemed phệ know what phệ do with the SS, but five years after the crane lifted off the last one the boat from Australia, these cars remain an outstanding value.

Improving on the G8
The Commodore had no American-market equivalent until the last throes of Pontiac in the early 2000s.Before the SS, there was the G8, a Pontiac-badged version of the Holden Commodore, a sedan so American it could only have come from Melbourne. Even though it is a British Commonwealth with expensive gasoline, Australia has a passion for big, rear-wheel-drive sedans with V8 engines — the kind of cars typically associated with Detroit.
The Commodore had no American-market equivalent until the last throes of Pontiac in the early 2000s when a desperate, pre-bankruptcy GM slapped a twin-grille front fascia on both V6- and V8-powered models and sold them here as the Pontiac G8. They weren’t a sales success, but they did generate some interest for a struggling brand. Still, Pontiac met the axe in 2010.
The stars aligned just perfectly for GM phệ try again a few years later. The 1980s W-Body Chevrolet Impala was ready phệ be put out phệ pasture, and GM needed something phệ sell phệ police departments. The automaker again turned phệ Holden, which had a new version of its Commodore. With steel wheels and a hose-out interior — not phệ mention available V8 power — Chevrolet resurrected the Caprice nameplate and marketed these big sedans phệ police departments.
The car was a hit with cops, and since the Caprice had already paved the path for its importation, it didn’t take much effort phệ fit a more refined interior and call it the SS.
It may have looked like the G8, but the SS was a new model on an updated platform shared with the contemporary Chevrolet Camaro. Its stiffer structure meant that GM could soften its ride phệ address one shopper complaint about the G8. Inside, it had a much better cabin with the same version of GM’s MyLink infotainment screen and software seen across the rest of the automaker’s lineup.
GM offered just one engine, the 6.2-liter V8 previously fitted in the ultra-limited G8 GXP. All were rear-wheel drive, with a 6-speed automatic at first and a manual transmission following for the second model year. The only choices shoppers had phệ make were phệ add a sunroof or pick between a host of colors with silly names, including “Regal Peacock Green,” “Some Like It Nóng Red,” and “Alchemy Purple.”
Priced at around $44,500, the Chevy SS was in line with a similarly equipped Dodge Charger R/T, its only real competition. Even back in 2014, the Charger was showing its age. An update for 2011 brought fresh styling and a better interior, but the SS weighed the better part of 500 pounds less and offered nearly 50 more hp — not phệ mention a manual transmission, the enthusiasts’ choice.
What Went Wrong?
Surprisingly, its bland, Malibu-like styling was part of the Chevrolet SS appeal.GM didn’t have big sales expectations for the SS, grouped with the Camaro and Corvette as its performance models. There was no mainstream V6-powered version for Chevy phệ sell phệ rental fleets. Every SS was very fast.
Even with a few minor updates through its lifespan, sales seldom topped 300 in a single month. Nearly 13,000 made their way here over five years, in line with GM’s modest projections.
Could GM have sold more? Possibly, particularly if the SS had looked more aggressive. But its bland, Malibu-like styling (even though that mid-size model gained sleek lines for 2016) was part of its appeal. It was a car for those in the know, much like BMW’s M models once were. No automaker goes for subtle performance today, other Volvo with its 455-hp S90.
It also may have been the wrong car at the wrong time. The market shifted strongly in favor of performance SUVs in the 2010s. Luxury automakers shoehorned big engines into small SUVs phệ create Mercedes-Benz GLC 63 AMG, BMW X5 M, and Audi SQ5 models. These SUVs came with impressive performance, high seating positions, and good handling — with the caveat that they drive well “for SUVs.”
GM tried phệ tie the SS into its NASCAR efforts. The competition car was, after all, a “Chevrolet SS” at least when it came phệ its graphics. But the old “race on Sunday, sell on Monday” philosophy from the 1960s doesn’t connect with modern car enthusiasts. NASCAR may be fun phệ watch, but the cars haven’t been “stock” for as long as many of today’s car buyers have been alive.
Post-bankruptcy GM doesn’t get the credit it should for treating enthusiasts phệ high-performance models with reasonable price tags. Even today, Cadillac charges a $13,000 premium for a 472-hp version of its CT4-V called Blackwing that can tickle 190 mph and includes a 6-speed manual gearbox. Just as we did when the SS was new, we seem phệ forget that the builder of mainstream Chevrolet Equinox SUVs can build performance machines.
Buying a Chevrolet SS Today
Find this 2019 Chevrolet SS for $51,000 in Florida.Well, maybe we haven’t forgotten about the SS. After depreciating phệ around $30,000, a well-kept, low-mile SS now cost you what it did when it was new — if not more.
These remain relatively rare cars, so you’ll either need phệ be flexible about color, or you’ll need phệ be willing phệ travel a bit phệ find the exact car of your dreams. There are about 180 SS sedans for sale on Autotrader across the country, fewer than 10% with manual transmissions.
This 2016 model finished in unusual Pearl Red is offered by a dealer in suburban Atlanta for just under $50,000, or you could grab this $53,500 final-year Orange Blast car at a dealer in Florida.
If you’re OK with an automatic transmission, you’ll pay less. Higher-mile (by SS standards) first-year cars can be found for around $35,000 right now, such as this Mystic Green car in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, with 73,000 miles.
That’s the price of a well-equipped Toyota Camry XLE or Chevrolet Equinox Premier. If you’re an enthusiast, which one would you look forward phệ driving phệ work every day? See Chevrolet SS models for sale
Related:
The Chevrolet SS Never Stood a Chance
Remember When GM Promised a Pontiac G8 Pickup?
General Motors Took Risks in the 2000s That Modern GM Never Would

Related Articles

Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai.

Back to top button