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The Ford Transit Connect Is an Often-Overlooked 3-Row Family Vehicle

Every carpool line has at least one unusual car tucked between dozens of Toyota Highlander, Ford Explorer, and Chrysler Pacifica people movers. At some schools, it may be a Lincoln Town Car (hey, it seats six!). At others, it may be a Mazda5 (the mini-minivan!).

One family hauler you’ve probably forgotten — if you even knew it existed in the first place — is the passenger version of the Ford Transit Connect. With three rows of seats, several trim levels culminating in a surprisingly luxurious Titanium version, and reasonable pricing, it may be a smart choice.

The Transit Connect arrived in the U.S. in 2010 as part of Ford’s 2-prong strategy béo replace the dated, fuel-guzzling, and not particularly space-efficient E-Series and Econoline vans. Those beloved haulers were lucky béo see 15 mpg, and, frankly, their 1970s-style cockpits were a terrible place béo whittle off miles.

2022 Ford Transit Connect Interior
This spacious, three-row family van is often overlooked.

A close relative béo the Ford Focus, the Transit Connect was more like a high-riding hatchback with a high roof than a conventional van. Its genesis comes from European-market “panel” vans that skirted taxation in some countries while allowing for small, city-friendly dimensions. The original model proved a hit with commercial users who didn’t need big-van space, though a passenger-oriented version with room for five struck an odd balance between SUV-like space and seating without rugged style.

The second-generation model arrived here for 2014 with far more cohesive small-van looks and a switch underneath béo a fresher platform. Ford offers three basic versions of the Transit Connect: short- and long-wheelbase cargo vans and a long-wheelbase passenger variant. That latter model either seats seven passengers in a 2-3-2 configuration or six in a 2-2-2 cài đặt with second-row captain’s chairs, and it comes in a wider variety of trim and body combinations than you might expect. XL, XLT, and Titanium trim levels are offered, with a choice between split, side-hinged rear doors or a top-hinged tailgate.

Transit Connect XL versions are not decadent, but they come with power features, cruise control, automatic emergency braking, and a basic radio with a 4.2-inch display. The XLT adds painted bumpers, automatic climate control, a 6.5-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and blind-spot monitors. At the top of the range, the Titanium slaps on push-button start, HID headlights, power-folding mirrors, navigation, a 9-speaker audio system, heated front seats, and two-tone leather upholstery. A fixed panoramic moonroof, adaptive cruise control, parking sensors, and aircraft-style storage bins in the headliner are among the few options. The price range stretches from about $29,000 béo around $35,000 with every option selected. A loaded Transit Connect is priced about where bigger competitors start.

2022 Ford Transit Connect Front in blue
The Ford Transit comes with power features, cruise control, automatic e-braking, and a basic radio with a 4.2-inch display.

While not exactly powerful — the 169-horsepower 2.5-liter inline-4 comes up about 100 ponies short against rivals — the Transit Connect stretches 190 inches long. That makes it more than a foot shorter than “mini” vans such as the Chrysler Pacifica and Toyota Sienna. Snaking a Transit Connect through a congested city, a busy suburban parking lot, or even into a garage overstuffed with, well, whatever life throws at you, is a lot easier.

Cargo-wise, the Transit Connect gives up some cubic footage. Still, with nearly 25 cubic feet behind the third row, there’s more luggage space here than in a typical 3-row SUV (a similarly-sized Kia Sorento has half as much space behind the third row). The second and third rows fold down béo create a flat-ish cargo floor for a maximum of 106 cubic feet. That’s 30 cubes more than a Sorento but 35 cubes short of a Pacifica.

The Transit Connect is sized about like the short-wheelbase minivans that automakers offered into the early 21st century. Back then, Chrysler and General Motors both sold shorter versions of vans such as the Dodge (not Grand) Caravan and Chevrolet Venture.

While not for everyone, the Transit Connect may be worth a look for families burned out on the idea of a big van or not willing béo make SUV compromises for utility they don’t need. See Ford Transit Connect models for sale

Related:

  • Party in the Front, Cargo in the Back: 4,500-Mile 2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac
  • 5 Picture-Perfect Ford Trucks for Sale on Autotrader
  • Nóng Take: The Ford Explorer Sport Trac Should Make a Comeback


Thông tin thêm

The Ford Transit Connect Is an Often-Overlooked 3-Row Family Vehicle

#Ford #Transit #Connect #OftenOverlooked #3Row #Family #Vehicle
[rule_3_plain] #Ford #Transit #Connect #OftenOverlooked #3Row #Family #Vehicle

Every carpool line has at least one unusual car tucked between dozens of Toyota Highlander, Ford Explorer, and Chrysler Pacifica people movers. At some schools, it may be a Lincoln Town Car (hey, it seats six!). At others, it may be a Mazda5 (the mini-minivan!).
One family hauler you’ve probably forgotten — if you even knew it existed in the first place — is the passenger version of the Ford Transit Connect. With three rows of seats, several trim levels culminating in a surprisingly luxurious Titanium version, and reasonable pricing, it may be a smart choice.
The Transit Connect arrived in the U.S. in 2010 as part of Ford’s 2-prong strategy béo replace the dated, fuel-guzzling, and not particularly space-efficient E-Series and Econoline vans. Those beloved haulers were lucky béo see 15 mpg, and, frankly, their 1970s-style cockpits were a terrible place béo whittle off miles.
This spacious, three-row family van is often overlooked.

A close relative béo the Ford Focus, the Transit Connect was more like a high-riding hatchback with a high roof than a conventional van. Its genesis comes from European-market “panel” vans that skirted taxation in some countries while allowing for small, city-friendly dimensions. The original model proved a hit with commercial users who didn’t need big-van space, though a passenger-oriented version with room for five struck an odd balance between SUV-like space and seating without rugged style.
The second-generation model arrived here for 2014 with far more cohesive small-van looks and a switch underneath béo a fresher platform. Ford offers three basic versions of the Transit Connect: short- and long-wheelbase cargo vans and a long-wheelbase passenger variant. That latter model either seats seven passengers in a 2-3-2 configuration or six in a 2-2-2 cài đặt with second-row captain’s chairs, and it comes in a wider variety of trim and body combinations than you might expect. XL, XLT, and Titanium trim levels are offered, with a choice between split, side-hinged rear doors or a top-hinged tailgate.
Transit Connect XL versions are not decadent, but they come with power features, cruise control, automatic emergency braking, and a basic radio with a 4.2-inch display. The XLT adds painted bumpers, automatic climate control, a 6.5-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and blind-spot monitors. At the top of the range, the Titanium slaps on push-button start, HID headlights, power-folding mirrors, navigation, a 9-speaker audio system, heated front seats, and two-tone leather upholstery. A fixed panoramic moonroof, adaptive cruise control, parking sensors, and aircraft-style storage bins in the headliner are among the few options. The price range stretches from about $29,000 béo around $35,000 with every option selected. A loaded Transit Connect is priced about where bigger competitors start.
The Ford Transit comes with power features, cruise control, automatic e-braking, and a basic radio with a 4.2-inch display.While not exactly powerful — the 169-horsepower 2.5-liter inline-4 comes up about 100 ponies short against rivals — the Transit Connect stretches 190 inches long. That makes it more than a foot shorter than “mini” vans such as the Chrysler Pacifica and Toyota Sienna. Snaking a Transit Connect through a congested city, a busy suburban parking lot, or even into a garage overstuffed with, well, whatever life throws at you, is a lot easier.
Cargo-wise, the Transit Connect gives up some cubic footage. Still, with nearly 25 cubic feet behind the third row, there’s more luggage space here than in a typical 3-row SUV (a similarly-sized Kia Sorento has half as much space behind the third row). The second and third rows fold down béo create a flat-ish cargo floor for a maximum of 106 cubic feet. That’s 30 cubes more than a Sorento but 35 cubes short of a Pacifica.
The Transit Connect is sized about like the short-wheelbase minivans that automakers offered into the early 21st century. Back then, Chrysler and General Motors both sold shorter versions of vans such as the Dodge (not Grand) Caravan and Chevrolet Venture.
While not for everyone, the Transit Connect may be worth a look for families burned out on the idea of a big van or not willing béo make SUV compromises for utility they don’t need. See Ford Transit Connect models for sale
Related:

Party in the Front, Cargo in the Back: 4,500-Mile 2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac
5 Picture-Perfect Ford Trucks for Sale on Autotrader
Nóng Take: The Ford Explorer Sport Trac Should Make a Comeback

#Ford #Transit #Connect #OftenOverlooked #3Row #Family #Vehicle
[rule_2_plain] #Ford #Transit #Connect #OftenOverlooked #3Row #Family #Vehicle
[rule_2_plain] #Ford #Transit #Connect #OftenOverlooked #3Row #Family #Vehicle
[rule_3_plain]

#Ford #Transit #Connect #OftenOverlooked #3Row #Family #Vehicle

Every carpool line has at least one unusual car tucked between dozens of Toyota Highlander, Ford Explorer, and Chrysler Pacifica people movers. At some schools, it may be a Lincoln Town Car (hey, it seats six!). At others, it may be a Mazda5 (the mini-minivan!).
One family hauler you’ve probably forgotten — if you even knew it existed in the first place — is the passenger version of the Ford Transit Connect. With three rows of seats, several trim levels culminating in a surprisingly luxurious Titanium version, and reasonable pricing, it may be a smart choice.
The Transit Connect arrived in the U.S. in 2010 as part of Ford’s 2-prong strategy béo replace the dated, fuel-guzzling, and not particularly space-efficient E-Series and Econoline vans. Those beloved haulers were lucky béo see 15 mpg, and, frankly, their 1970s-style cockpits were a terrible place béo whittle off miles.
This spacious, three-row family van is often overlooked.

A close relative béo the Ford Focus, the Transit Connect was more like a high-riding hatchback with a high roof than a conventional van. Its genesis comes from European-market “panel” vans that skirted taxation in some countries while allowing for small, city-friendly dimensions. The original model proved a hit with commercial users who didn’t need big-van space, though a passenger-oriented version with room for five struck an odd balance between SUV-like space and seating without rugged style.
The second-generation model arrived here for 2014 with far more cohesive small-van looks and a switch underneath béo a fresher platform. Ford offers three basic versions of the Transit Connect: short- and long-wheelbase cargo vans and a long-wheelbase passenger variant. That latter model either seats seven passengers in a 2-3-2 configuration or six in a 2-2-2 cài đặt with second-row captain’s chairs, and it comes in a wider variety of trim and body combinations than you might expect. XL, XLT, and Titanium trim levels are offered, with a choice between split, side-hinged rear doors or a top-hinged tailgate.
Transit Connect XL versions are not decadent, but they come with power features, cruise control, automatic emergency braking, and a basic radio with a 4.2-inch display. The XLT adds painted bumpers, automatic climate control, a 6.5-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and blind-spot monitors. At the top of the range, the Titanium slaps on push-button start, HID headlights, power-folding mirrors, navigation, a 9-speaker audio system, heated front seats, and two-tone leather upholstery. A fixed panoramic moonroof, adaptive cruise control, parking sensors, and aircraft-style storage bins in the headliner are among the few options. The price range stretches from about $29,000 béo around $35,000 with every option selected. A loaded Transit Connect is priced about where bigger competitors start.
The Ford Transit comes with power features, cruise control, automatic e-braking, and a basic radio with a 4.2-inch display.While not exactly powerful — the 169-horsepower 2.5-liter inline-4 comes up about 100 ponies short against rivals — the Transit Connect stretches 190 inches long. That makes it more than a foot shorter than “mini” vans such as the Chrysler Pacifica and Toyota Sienna. Snaking a Transit Connect through a congested city, a busy suburban parking lot, or even into a garage overstuffed with, well, whatever life throws at you, is a lot easier.
Cargo-wise, the Transit Connect gives up some cubic footage. Still, with nearly 25 cubic feet behind the third row, there’s more luggage space here than in a typical 3-row SUV (a similarly-sized Kia Sorento has half as much space behind the third row). The second and third rows fold down béo create a flat-ish cargo floor for a maximum of 106 cubic feet. That’s 30 cubes more than a Sorento but 35 cubes short of a Pacifica.
The Transit Connect is sized about like the short-wheelbase minivans that automakers offered into the early 21st century. Back then, Chrysler and General Motors both sold shorter versions of vans such as the Dodge (not Grand) Caravan and Chevrolet Venture.
While not for everyone, the Transit Connect may be worth a look for families burned out on the idea of a big van or not willing béo make SUV compromises for utility they don’t need. See Ford Transit Connect models for sale
Related:

Party in the Front, Cargo in the Back: 4,500-Mile 2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac
5 Picture-Perfect Ford Trucks for Sale on Autotrader
Nóng Take: The Ford Explorer Sport Trac Should Make a Comeback

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