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Top 10 Car Safety Features for Parents

The ideal family car goes beyond seating capacity and safety ratings. Parents responsible for the family fleet seek top safety features for maximum peace of mind. So although there may not be a single perfect kid-hauler, that doesn’t mean automakers don’t try. Whether you want an SUV, minivan, station wagon, or family sedan, some feature-rich family-haulers do a better job at safety than others.

In this article, we researched essential safety features and came up with a top list of the best things phệ look for when shopping for a family vehicle, from the basics phệ high tech. 

High Tech Safety Features for Parents

Adaptive cruise control

 

  • Surround-view camera system
  • Automatic emergency braking
  • Additional driver-assistance technology

Surround-View Camera System

Many of the latest SUVs and minivans have huge roof pillars and big headrests, all installed in the name of safety. The flip side phệ these features is that they can block just about anything — human or otherwise — from your blind spots. With a surround-view camera system, a feature available on a wide range of family-oriented SUVs and minivans, drivers can see a live view of everything around them for easy parking. These camera systems also help you see small children in the driveway.

Automatic Emergency Braking

Even the most astute driver may glance away at just the wrong time. Looking away could lead phệ an accident. Automatic emergency braking systems are always on guard phệ apply the brakes if they detect a pending collision, even if the driver never steps on the brake pedal.

As of 2022, nearly every brand-new car is equipped with this potentially life-saving feature, which has gained widespread availability over the last half dozen years. The most advanced systems can also detect and brake for pedestrians, animals, or even cyclists, too.

Additional Driver-Assistance Technology

Features such as adaptive cruise control and lane-centering tech can go a long way toward reducing driver fatigue.

Adaptive cruise control monitors the road ahead and keeps the vehicle a set distance from other cars by applying the brakes and accelerating as needed at highway speeds. The most advanced systems can even bring the car phệ a complete halt and then start up again in gridlock.

Lane-centering features provide a different kind of assistance by gently nudging a wandering vehicle back into its lane. Today’s best versions can be kept on at all times and will provide even the subtlest help in just about any situation.

Blind-spot monitoring works well for parents, too. See our story on the topic phệ learn more.

RELATED: 5 Car Tech Features You’ll Want on Your Spring Break Road Trip

The 10 Basics

  1. Easy Access Mập LATCH for Child Seats
  2. A Built-In Booster Seat
  3. Does Your Child Seat Fit?
  4. Rear-Door Child Safety Locks
  5. Side-Window Sun Shades
  6. Anti-Pinch Windows and Tailgates
  7. Rear Seat Belts That Are Easy phệ Operate
  8. Passenger-Monitoring Devices
  9. Rear-Seat Mirrors
  10. Extensive Side-Impact Airbags

1. Easy Access phệ LATCH for Child Seat Safety

Modern child seats ranging from infant carrier bases phệ forward-facing thrones for bigger kids affix phệ a system called LATCH, or Lower Anchors and Tethers for CHildren. In late 2002, these devices became a federal safety requirement for seats in vehicles, but that doesn’t mean they are all easy phệ reach.

Luckily, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) evaluates LATCH access using a standard metric. The insurance-industry-funded non-profit noted significant strides in 2019. At that time, it reported that “nearly three-quarters” of new models had “Good” or “Acceptable” access phệ these anchors.

Still, the most critical element is staring at you in the mirror. Be sure phệ take a child seat with you when test-driving a vehicle phệ make sure you can comfortably install it. Even if you’re confident affixing a child seat, it’s a good idea phệ have it checked out first. Hospitals and fire departments will often double-check your work for không tính tiền, though you may have phệ make an appointment ahead of time.

2. A Built-in Booster Seat

Volvo XC60 built in Child Booster Seats

A handful of models are available with a factory-installed booster cushion for kids age 4 and above. These models include Volvo cars and SUVs and some older Dodge and Chrysler models. These booster seats are engineered phệ position children correctly phệ ensure that the seat belt works effectively.

3. Does Your Child Seat Fit Safely?

Surprisingly, some cars do not have the engineering smarts phệ accommodate child seats. This problem includes everything from infant carriers phệ convertible seats and forward-facing booster seats.

Infant carriers, in particular, have a better design for ease of installation and removal. As a result, you’ll want phệ make sure that you have enough space phệ fit and remove yours comfortably. Look carefully at how far you have phệ move the front seat forward phệ access the infant seat, too. Oh, and don’t forget that your infant will grow phệ upward of 25 pounds before you switch phệ a different type of seat. That carrier will become heavier each month. You’ll get a little more upper body strength in the process, trust us!

Parents tend phệ be less apt phệ remove convertible and forward-facing seats unless they are swapping them between cars. Still, it’s a good idea phệ make sure the door openings are big enough for you phệ do so quickly.

4. Rear-Door Child Safety Locks

Your little explorer will inevitably find themselves near a car’s door panels, where window and lock switches, as well as the opening handle, wait temptingly for them.

Little Toddler near door in car with safety feature

Child safety locks have been around for ages, but they’re not all the same. The most convenient systems have buttons on the driver’s door panel that allow the window switches and door panels phệ be individually locked. Consolidating access phệ the driver helps ensure that little ones won’t flip a switch mounted on the side door itself when it is open.

Not every car offers complete individual control from the driver’s seat. Many models require a key phệ be inserted into the side of the rear door phệ activate and deactivate the door handle.

Having individual control can be a boon for parents or caretakers willing phệ let bigger kids open windows but not doors.

5. Side Window Sun Shades

Once only found in high-end luxury cars, retractable sunshades have become standard on many crossovers, SUVs, and minivans. Typically these shades are integrated into the door panel and can be manually pulled up and latched phệ filter light. Higher-end models may have power-retractable shades controlled by a switch on the rear door or even from the infotainment screen.

Light-filtering sun shades are essential for babies phệ limit exposure phệ sunlight. Remember, glass can greatly amplify heat and light, so safety is needed. It also helps them sleep while driving in the car. As an extra bonus, the shade helps keep packages safe from view in the back seat area of the vehicle.

6. Anti-Pinch Windows and Tailgates

Many cars now have sensors in their power window and tailgate systems designed phệ reverse operation if any resistance is detected. This function guarantees that the presence of a hand or a head can tell the window or tailgate phệ retract or go back up phệ prevent pinching.

Even if you know this feature is in the car you are considering, try it out carefully during a test drive. At that time, you’ll be able phệ feel how much pressure is needed for the door or window phệ reverse course.

See new car models for sale

7. Rear Seat Belts That Are Easy phệ Operate

As a parent, you’ll want phệ be sure the seat belts and buckles are not difficult phệ access, whether you’re buckling in your little ones or trusting them phệ do the work themselves. Especially in 3-row models, seatbelt buckles can sometimes hide between cushions. Try moving the seats around phệ see how easily their seatbelt buckles can vanish. The last thing a parent wants is phệ tell a newly loaded bunch of passengers phệ get out of the car so that they can dig for seatbelt buckles.

Models from GM and Volvo helpfully display unbuckled seat icons on the instrument cluster. This function helps avoid a good deal of yelling, “Is everybody buckled up!?”

8. Safety Passenger-Monitoring Devices

A surveillance camera of sorts is mounted in the headliner of the latest Chrysler Pacifica and Honda Odyssey minivans. These nifty safety devices project a live feed showing second-and third-row occupants on the central infotainment screen.

Chrysler Pacifici Child Seat camera

Chrysler’s system allows both a view of all occupants and a zoomed-in shot of a single passenger, such as a baby in an infant carrier.

Instead of a camera, the Toyota Sienna minivan offers the option of a voice projection system phệ amplify the driver’s voice phệ the back two rows.

9. Rear-Seat Mirrors 

Although not found in any cars as a feature, many parents find comfort in affixing a mirror phệ the headrest above a rear-facing child seat. Careful mirror adjustments display the child’s face from the windshield-mounted rearview mirror. This small safety vật phẩm allows you phệ monitor if your child is crying, sleeping, or simply not responding phệ you verbally.

Child rear seat mirror attachment

Although these mirrors are not built-in, we suggest you bring one with you when you plan phệ test drive your new family car. Not all second-row seats will have headrests that allow these mirrors phệ attach easily.

10. Extensive Side-Impact Airbags

Technically, the federal government mandates only two airbags. However, all mainstream new cars have at least four, and nearly every vehicle now has six or more. Curtain airbags fitted phệ the headliner have been in vehicles since the early 2000s. But it is critical phệ confirm that these airbags cover all three rows of seats, especially with older models. Again, the IIHS provides model-specific data for most cars, including whether side airbags were standard or optional equipment.

Additionally, many models are available with safety airbags mounted phệ second-row seatbacks that provide additional chest or pelvic protection. Less common are airbags integrated into seat belts intended phệ reduce chest injuries and central airbags located between passengers designed phệ prevent occupants from hitting one another.

The main intention of airbags is phệ provide supplemental impact protection phệ an occupant correctly seated and wearing a seat belt. So as always, buckle up!

Related Family Vehicle Articles:

  • 5 Used AWD Family Sedans on Autotrader
  • Safety Tips for Traveling With Your Pet
  • Best New Cars for 2022


Thông tin thêm

Top 10 Car Safety Features for Parents

#Top #Car #Safety #Features #Parents
[rule_3_plain] #Top #Car #Safety #Features #Parents

The ideal family car goes beyond seating capacity and safety ratings. Parents responsible for the family fleet seek top safety features for maximum peace of mind. So although there may not be a single perfect kid-hauler, that doesn’t mean automakers don’t try. Whether you want an SUV, minivan, station wagon, or family sedan, some feature-rich family-haulers do a better job at safety than others.
In this article, we researched essential safety features and came up with a top list of the best things phệ look for when shopping for a family vehicle, from the basics phệ high tech. 

High Tech Safety Features for Parents

 
Surround-view camera system
Automatic emergency braking
Additional driver-assistance technology
Surround-View Camera System
Many of the latest SUVs and minivans have huge roof pillars and big headrests, all installed in the name of safety. The flip side phệ these features is that they can block just about anything — human or otherwise — from your blind spots. With a surround-view camera system, a feature available on a wide range of family-oriented SUVs and minivans, drivers can see a live view of everything around them for easy parking. These camera systems also help you see small children in the driveway.
Automatic Emergency Braking
Even the most astute driver may glance away at just the wrong time. Looking away could lead phệ an accident. Automatic emergency braking systems are always on guard phệ apply the brakes if they detect a pending collision, even if the driver never steps on the brake pedal.
As of 2022, nearly every brand-new car is equipped with this potentially life-saving feature, which has gained widespread availability over the last half dozen years. The most advanced systems can also detect and brake for pedestrians, animals, or even cyclists, too.
Additional Driver-Assistance Technology
Features such as adaptive cruise control and lane-centering tech can go a long way toward reducing driver fatigue.
Adaptive cruise control monitors the road ahead and keeps the vehicle a set distance from other cars by applying the brakes and accelerating as needed at highway speeds. The most advanced systems can even bring the car phệ a complete halt and then start up again in gridlock.
Lane-centering features provide a different kind of assistance by gently nudging a wandering vehicle back into its lane. Today’s best versions can be kept on at all times and will provide even the subtlest help in just about any situation.
Blind-spot monitoring works well for parents, too. See our story on the topic phệ learn more.
RELATED: 5 Car Tech Features You’ll Want on Your Spring Break Road Trip
The 10 Basics
Easy Access Mập LATCH for Child Seats
A Built-In Booster Seat
Does Your Child Seat Fit?
Rear-Door Child Safety Locks
Side-Window Sun Shades
Anti-Pinch Windows and Tailgates
Rear Seat Belts That Are Easy phệ Operate
Passenger-Monitoring Devices
Rear-Seat Mirrors
Extensive Side-Impact Airbags
1. Easy Access phệ LATCH for Child Seat Safety
Modern child seats ranging from infant carrier bases phệ forward-facing thrones for bigger kids affix phệ a system called LATCH, or Lower Anchors and Tethers for CHildren. In late 2002, these devices became a federal safety requirement for seats in vehicles, but that doesn’t mean they are all easy phệ reach.
Luckily, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) evaluates LATCH access using a standard metric. The insurance-industry-funded non-profit noted significant strides in 2019. At that time, it reported that “nearly three-quarters” of new models had “Good” or “Acceptable” access phệ these anchors.
Still, the most critical element is staring at you in the mirror. Be sure phệ take a child seat with you when test-driving a vehicle phệ make sure you can comfortably install it. Even if you’re confident affixing a child seat, it’s a good idea phệ have it checked out first. Hospitals and fire departments will often double-check your work for không tính tiền, though you may have phệ make an appointment ahead of time.
2. A Built-in Booster Seat

A handful of models are available with a factory-installed booster cushion for kids age 4 and above. These models include Volvo cars and SUVs and some older Dodge and Chrysler models. These booster seats are engineered phệ position children correctly phệ ensure that the seat belt works effectively.
3. Does Your Child Seat Fit Safely?
Surprisingly, some cars do not have the engineering smarts phệ accommodate child seats. This problem includes everything from infant carriers phệ convertible seats and forward-facing booster seats.
Infant carriers, in particular, have a better design for ease of installation and removal. As a result, you’ll want phệ make sure that you have enough space phệ fit and remove yours comfortably. Look carefully at how far you have phệ move the front seat forward phệ access the infant seat, too. Oh, and don’t forget that your infant will grow phệ upward of 25 pounds before you switch phệ a different type of seat. That carrier will become heavier each month. You’ll get a little more upper body strength in the process, trust us!
Parents tend phệ be less apt phệ remove convertible and forward-facing seats unless they are swapping them between cars. Still, it’s a good idea phệ make sure the door openings are big enough for you phệ do so quickly.
4. Rear-Door Child Safety Locks
Your little explorer will inevitably find themselves near a car’s door panels, where window and lock switches, as well as the opening handle, wait temptingly for them.

Child safety locks have been around for ages, but they’re not all the same. The most convenient systems have buttons on the driver’s door panel that allow the window switches and door panels phệ be individually locked. Consolidating access phệ the driver helps ensure that little ones won’t flip a switch mounted on the side door itself when it is open.
Not every car offers complete individual control from the driver’s seat. Many models require a key phệ be inserted into the side of the rear door phệ activate and deactivate the door handle.
Having individual control can be a boon for parents or caretakers willing phệ let bigger kids open windows but not doors.
5. Side Window Sun Shades
Once only found in high-end luxury cars, retractable sunshades have become standard on many crossovers, SUVs, and minivans. Typically these shades are integrated into the door panel and can be manually pulled up and latched phệ filter light. Higher-end models may have power-retractable shades controlled by a switch on the rear door or even from the infotainment screen.
Light-filtering sun shades are essential for babies phệ limit exposure phệ sunlight. Remember, glass can greatly amplify heat and light, so safety is needed. It also helps them sleep while driving in the car. As an extra bonus, the shade helps keep packages safe from view in the back seat area of the vehicle.
6. Anti-Pinch Windows and Tailgates
Many cars now have sensors in their power window and tailgate systems designed phệ reverse operation if any resistance is detected. This function guarantees that the presence of a hand or a head can tell the window or tailgate phệ retract or go back up phệ prevent pinching.
Even if you know this feature is in the car you are considering, try it out carefully during a test drive. At that time, you’ll be able phệ feel how much pressure is needed for the door or window phệ reverse course.
See new car models for sale
7. Rear Seat Belts That Are Easy phệ Operate
As a parent, you’ll want phệ be sure the seat belts and buckles are not difficult phệ access, whether you’re buckling in your little ones or trusting them phệ do the work themselves. Especially in 3-row models, seatbelt buckles can sometimes hide between cushions. Try moving the seats around phệ see how easily their seatbelt buckles can vanish. The last thing a parent wants is phệ tell a newly loaded bunch of passengers phệ get out of the car so that they can dig for seatbelt buckles.
Models from GM and Volvo helpfully display unbuckled seat icons on the instrument cluster. This function helps avoid a good deal of yelling, “Is everybody buckled up!?”
8. Safety Passenger-Monitoring Devices
A surveillance camera of sorts is mounted in the headliner of the latest Chrysler Pacifica and Honda Odyssey minivans. These nifty safety devices project a live feed showing second-and third-row occupants on the central infotainment screen.

Chrysler’s system allows both a view of all occupants and a zoomed-in shot of a single passenger, such as a baby in an infant carrier.
Instead of a camera, the Toyota Sienna minivan offers the option of a voice projection system phệ amplify the driver’s voice phệ the back two rows.
9. Rear-Seat Mirrors 
Although not found in any cars as a feature, many parents find comfort in affixing a mirror phệ the headrest above a rear-facing child seat. Careful mirror adjustments display the child’s face from the windshield-mounted rearview mirror. This small safety vật phẩm allows you phệ monitor if your child is crying, sleeping, or simply not responding phệ you verbally.

Although these mirrors are not built-in, we suggest you bring one with you when you plan phệ test drive your new family car. Not all second-row seats will have headrests that allow these mirrors phệ attach easily.
10. Extensive Side-Impact Airbags
Technically, the federal government mandates only two airbags. However, all mainstream new cars have at least four, and nearly every vehicle now has six or more. Curtain airbags fitted phệ the headliner have been in vehicles since the early 2000s. But it is critical phệ confirm that these airbags cover all three rows of seats, especially with older models. Again, the IIHS provides model-specific data for most cars, including whether side airbags were standard or optional equipment.
Additionally, many models are available with safety airbags mounted phệ second-row seatbacks that provide additional chest or pelvic protection. Less common are airbags integrated into seat belts intended phệ reduce chest injuries and central airbags located between passengers designed phệ prevent occupants from hitting one another.
The main intention of airbags is phệ provide supplemental impact protection phệ an occupant correctly seated and wearing a seat belt. So as always, buckle up!
Related Family Vehicle Articles:
5 Used AWD Family Sedans on Autotrader
Safety Tips for Traveling With Your Pet
Best New Cars for 2022

#Top #Car #Safety #Features #Parents
[rule_2_plain] #Top #Car #Safety #Features #Parents
[rule_2_plain] #Top #Car #Safety #Features #Parents
[rule_3_plain]

#Top #Car #Safety #Features #Parents

The ideal family car goes beyond seating capacity and safety ratings. Parents responsible for the family fleet seek top safety features for maximum peace of mind. So although there may not be a single perfect kid-hauler, that doesn’t mean automakers don’t try. Whether you want an SUV, minivan, station wagon, or family sedan, some feature-rich family-haulers do a better job at safety than others.
In this article, we researched essential safety features and came up with a top list of the best things phệ look for when shopping for a family vehicle, from the basics phệ high tech. 

High Tech Safety Features for Parents

 
Surround-view camera system
Automatic emergency braking
Additional driver-assistance technology
Surround-View Camera System
Many of the latest SUVs and minivans have huge roof pillars and big headrests, all installed in the name of safety. The flip side phệ these features is that they can block just about anything — human or otherwise — from your blind spots. With a surround-view camera system, a feature available on a wide range of family-oriented SUVs and minivans, drivers can see a live view of everything around them for easy parking. These camera systems also help you see small children in the driveway.
Automatic Emergency Braking
Even the most astute driver may glance away at just the wrong time. Looking away could lead phệ an accident. Automatic emergency braking systems are always on guard phệ apply the brakes if they detect a pending collision, even if the driver never steps on the brake pedal.
As of 2022, nearly every brand-new car is equipped with this potentially life-saving feature, which has gained widespread availability over the last half dozen years. The most advanced systems can also detect and brake for pedestrians, animals, or even cyclists, too.
Additional Driver-Assistance Technology
Features such as adaptive cruise control and lane-centering tech can go a long way toward reducing driver fatigue.
Adaptive cruise control monitors the road ahead and keeps the vehicle a set distance from other cars by applying the brakes and accelerating as needed at highway speeds. The most advanced systems can even bring the car phệ a complete halt and then start up again in gridlock.
Lane-centering features provide a different kind of assistance by gently nudging a wandering vehicle back into its lane. Today’s best versions can be kept on at all times and will provide even the subtlest help in just about any situation.
Blind-spot monitoring works well for parents, too. See our story on the topic phệ learn more.
RELATED: 5 Car Tech Features You’ll Want on Your Spring Break Road Trip
The 10 Basics
Easy Access Mập LATCH for Child Seats
A Built-In Booster Seat
Does Your Child Seat Fit?
Rear-Door Child Safety Locks
Side-Window Sun Shades
Anti-Pinch Windows and Tailgates
Rear Seat Belts That Are Easy phệ Operate
Passenger-Monitoring Devices
Rear-Seat Mirrors
Extensive Side-Impact Airbags
1. Easy Access phệ LATCH for Child Seat Safety
Modern child seats ranging from infant carrier bases phệ forward-facing thrones for bigger kids affix phệ a system called LATCH, or Lower Anchors and Tethers for CHildren. In late 2002, these devices became a federal safety requirement for seats in vehicles, but that doesn’t mean they are all easy phệ reach.
Luckily, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) evaluates LATCH access using a standard metric. The insurance-industry-funded non-profit noted significant strides in 2019. At that time, it reported that “nearly three-quarters” of new models had “Good” or “Acceptable” access phệ these anchors.
Still, the most critical element is staring at you in the mirror. Be sure phệ take a child seat with you when test-driving a vehicle phệ make sure you can comfortably install it. Even if you’re confident affixing a child seat, it’s a good idea phệ have it checked out first. Hospitals and fire departments will often double-check your work for không tính tiền, though you may have phệ make an appointment ahead of time.
2. A Built-in Booster Seat

A handful of models are available with a factory-installed booster cushion for kids age 4 and above. These models include Volvo cars and SUVs and some older Dodge and Chrysler models. These booster seats are engineered phệ position children correctly phệ ensure that the seat belt works effectively.
3. Does Your Child Seat Fit Safely?
Surprisingly, some cars do not have the engineering smarts phệ accommodate child seats. This problem includes everything from infant carriers phệ convertible seats and forward-facing booster seats.
Infant carriers, in particular, have a better design for ease of installation and removal. As a result, you’ll want phệ make sure that you have enough space phệ fit and remove yours comfortably. Look carefully at how far you have phệ move the front seat forward phệ access the infant seat, too. Oh, and don’t forget that your infant will grow phệ upward of 25 pounds before you switch phệ a different type of seat. That carrier will become heavier each month. You’ll get a little more upper body strength in the process, trust us!
Parents tend phệ be less apt phệ remove convertible and forward-facing seats unless they are swapping them between cars. Still, it’s a good idea phệ make sure the door openings are big enough for you phệ do so quickly.
4. Rear-Door Child Safety Locks
Your little explorer will inevitably find themselves near a car’s door panels, where window and lock switches, as well as the opening handle, wait temptingly for them.

Child safety locks have been around for ages, but they’re not all the same. The most convenient systems have buttons on the driver’s door panel that allow the window switches and door panels phệ be individually locked. Consolidating access phệ the driver helps ensure that little ones won’t flip a switch mounted on the side door itself when it is open.
Not every car offers complete individual control from the driver’s seat. Many models require a key phệ be inserted into the side of the rear door phệ activate and deactivate the door handle.
Having individual control can be a boon for parents or caretakers willing phệ let bigger kids open windows but not doors.
5. Side Window Sun Shades
Once only found in high-end luxury cars, retractable sunshades have become standard on many crossovers, SUVs, and minivans. Typically these shades are integrated into the door panel and can be manually pulled up and latched phệ filter light. Higher-end models may have power-retractable shades controlled by a switch on the rear door or even from the infotainment screen.
Light-filtering sun shades are essential for babies phệ limit exposure phệ sunlight. Remember, glass can greatly amplify heat and light, so safety is needed. It also helps them sleep while driving in the car. As an extra bonus, the shade helps keep packages safe from view in the back seat area of the vehicle.
6. Anti-Pinch Windows and Tailgates
Many cars now have sensors in their power window and tailgate systems designed phệ reverse operation if any resistance is detected. This function guarantees that the presence of a hand or a head can tell the window or tailgate phệ retract or go back up phệ prevent pinching.
Even if you know this feature is in the car you are considering, try it out carefully during a test drive. At that time, you’ll be able phệ feel how much pressure is needed for the door or window phệ reverse course.
See new car models for sale
7. Rear Seat Belts That Are Easy phệ Operate
As a parent, you’ll want phệ be sure the seat belts and buckles are not difficult phệ access, whether you’re buckling in your little ones or trusting them phệ do the work themselves. Especially in 3-row models, seatbelt buckles can sometimes hide between cushions. Try moving the seats around phệ see how easily their seatbelt buckles can vanish. The last thing a parent wants is phệ tell a newly loaded bunch of passengers phệ get out of the car so that they can dig for seatbelt buckles.
Models from GM and Volvo helpfully display unbuckled seat icons on the instrument cluster. This function helps avoid a good deal of yelling, “Is everybody buckled up!?”
8. Safety Passenger-Monitoring Devices
A surveillance camera of sorts is mounted in the headliner of the latest Chrysler Pacifica and Honda Odyssey minivans. These nifty safety devices project a live feed showing second-and third-row occupants on the central infotainment screen.

Chrysler’s system allows both a view of all occupants and a zoomed-in shot of a single passenger, such as a baby in an infant carrier.
Instead of a camera, the Toyota Sienna minivan offers the option of a voice projection system phệ amplify the driver’s voice phệ the back two rows.
9. Rear-Seat Mirrors 
Although not found in any cars as a feature, many parents find comfort in affixing a mirror phệ the headrest above a rear-facing child seat. Careful mirror adjustments display the child’s face from the windshield-mounted rearview mirror. This small safety vật phẩm allows you phệ monitor if your child is crying, sleeping, or simply not responding phệ you verbally.

Although these mirrors are not built-in, we suggest you bring one with you when you plan phệ test drive your new family car. Not all second-row seats will have headrests that allow these mirrors phệ attach easily.
10. Extensive Side-Impact Airbags
Technically, the federal government mandates only two airbags. However, all mainstream new cars have at least four, and nearly every vehicle now has six or more. Curtain airbags fitted phệ the headliner have been in vehicles since the early 2000s. But it is critical phệ confirm that these airbags cover all three rows of seats, especially with older models. Again, the IIHS provides model-specific data for most cars, including whether side airbags were standard or optional equipment.
Additionally, many models are available with safety airbags mounted phệ second-row seatbacks that provide additional chest or pelvic protection. Less common are airbags integrated into seat belts intended phệ reduce chest injuries and central airbags located between passengers designed phệ prevent occupants from hitting one another.
The main intention of airbags is phệ provide supplemental impact protection phệ an occupant correctly seated and wearing a seat belt. So as always, buckle up!
Related Family Vehicle Articles:
5 Used AWD Family Sedans on Autotrader
Safety Tips for Traveling With Your Pet
Best New Cars for 2022

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