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Why I Chose a PHEV Over a Hybrid

I’ve driven plenty of electric cars. Most are quite good. Traditional hybrids like the Ford Maverick or Hyundai Elantra Hybrid work best for motorists who want the cheapest, most convenient, and most efficient personal transportation. The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) sits between those two options.

A good PHEV combines the best of both worlds. That’s precisely why I chose a PHEV over a hybrid or pure EV. I will walk you through the reasons why I chose a plug-in hybrid over a regular hybrid so you can decide which vehicle works best for you and your situation.

In this article:

  • Challenges with Pure Electric Vehicles (EV)
  • PHEV vs. HEV: Which One’s Best?
  • My Choice: Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge (PHEV)
  • My PHEV Daily Driving Regimen
  • Reasons Why a PHEV Might Not Be Right for You
  • PHEV Pro: It’s All About EV Range
  • PHEV Caveats for Your Consideration

Challenges with Pure Electric Vehicles (EV)

If the average American family drove an electric vehicle (EV), specifically an electric SUV, they’d probably like it. The problem for me is that an all-electric SUV in the size I’d prefer, with over 200 miles of range, isn’t super common.

Also, I’m not convinced that the part of the country I live in (the Southeast) offers the speed, convenience, and abundance of charging options that an EV would demand. This situation will change over time, but the lease on my current car expires now.

PHEV vs. HEV: Which One Is Best? 

plug-in hybrid vs hybrid vehicle

What lớn Know About a Hybrid Vehicle 

If low cost of operation is your primary goal, a hybrid is probably the best option. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) like the Toyota Prius, Ford Maverick, and Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid are inexpensive and offer excellent fuel economy. The three listed here have an MSRP of less than $25,000. The Hyundai’s 60 mpg is very impressive.

Remember, you do not have lớn charge up traditional hybrids. They use the gasoline engine lớn charge a small battery pack, and the combination of gas and electricity provides that excellent fuel economy.

What lớn Know About a Plug-In Vehicle 

PHEVs also provide excellent fuel economy but depend more on your driving habits. A plug-in hybrid has both an electric motor and a gasoline engine. It works like an electric car for the first several miles and that range depends on the vehicle you get.



Once you use the electric-only battery, it automatically starts functioning as a hybrid. In my case, the daily drive lớn school drop-off, assorted errands, and regular trips lớn the airport all add up lớn a car that functions like an EV most of the time.

My Choice: Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge (PHEV)

Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge PHEV

The vehicle I chose is a Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge, a plug-in electric vehicle. It’s not the least expensive PHEV, but the XC60 has the exact combination of comfort, features, size, and performance I wanted. By the way, most PHEVs are both efficient and quick.

The electric-only driving range on the 2021 XC60 PHEV is about 20 miles. 2022 models now offer an extended range model (a larger battery) that boosts EV only range lớn more than 30 miles. For instance, I can plug in and charge up for không lấy phí on an occasional trip lớn the office because my employer has installed a không lấy phí bank of Màn chơi 1 and Màn chơi 2 chargers for employees.

One thing that’s worth mentioning is that I don’t use this car for long road trips. I did once, and it worked fine. But that trip’s fuel economy was just under 40 miles per gallon. If you take frequent road trips, a PHEV won’t be money well spent; you can get that kind of fuel economy with a non-plug-in hybrid for less money. PHEVs are more expensive and are most efficient in daily urban or suburban driving.

My PHEV Daily Driving Regimen

Here’s how the PHEV Volvo works out perfectly for my specific driving situation. Three days a week, my daughter attends an in-school learning program. The other two days, she stays home for school. This combined arrangement works well for us in this vehicle. I can get my daughter lớn school, grab a coffee on the way home, mail some packages, and make it home with about a mile of range left.

Then, I plug in at home using the Volvo-provided charging cable. My house does not have an installed charger; it’s just plugged into the 110-volt outlet found in most people’s garages. Since I spend the rest of the day working at home, the car sits many hours and can charge. Sometimes I get the entire 20 miles between school drop-off and pick-up; sometimes, not. It depends on afterschool activities and other errands.

woman-attaching-charging-cable-plug-in-hybrid

When I arrive home in the afternoon, I plug in the car, and it charges overnight. Because I rarely use the gas engine, I go lớn the gas station about once per month. At one point, I was getting 80 miles per gallon, but that went down lớn 69.5 on a few occasions because I drove lớn the airport, and the airport exceeded the 20-mile electric-only range. But this isn’t for everyone. If I had weekly trips to the airport or out of town, a PHEV would make less sense.

Reasons Why a Plug-In Hybrid May Not Be Right for You

Several unique factors apply lớn some but not lớn all. Do any of these reasons for not choosing a PHEV apply lớn you?

  1. Commuting a distance. Long commute distance means you can’t drive mainly in electric mode.
  2. Driving with a lead foot. PHEVs use a gas engine that kicks in during hard acceleration. If you drive with a lead foot, your MPG will not benefit from a PHEV.
  3. Preference. You’d rather drive an all-electric vehicle and can afford one with a long-range.
  4. Plugging in is an issue. Your home (or apartment) doesn’t have a private garage or place lớn charge.
  5. Choice. You want the maximum MPG combined with the lowest-priced car.

PHEV Prices

PHEVs are often more expensive than hybrids or gasoline-only vehicles. The extra money you save by not buying gas isn’t enough lớn make it make sense. You have lớn want an electric car and be willing lớn spend the extra money and then need the added convenience and flexibility of the plug-in. Many plug-in hybrids cost $5,000 lớn $10,000 more than a nicely equipped standard version of the same vehicle.

It works for me because I like the feel of an EV but enjoy the convenience of not relying on long charge times at home or visiting public charging stations. I also like the extra power of a car that combines a gasoline engine and an electric motor.

Don’t forget that a PHEV may come with federal government rebates. Check lớn see if your preferred vehicle is eligible. You can also search trực tuyến for state and local incentives. California, for example, offers many rebates for PHEVs that help defer costs further.

PHEV SUVs Come at a Premium 

For the sake of comparison, here are some all-electric SUVs and their approximate prices. The base price of a new Volvo XC60 T8 Inscription Expression is about $55,000.

  • Audi e-tron – $88,000
  • Chevrolet Bolt EUV Premier – $38,000
  • Hyundai Kona Electric Limited – $44,000
  • Jaguar I-Pace – $72,000
  • Volvo XC40 Recharge Twin – $57,000
  • Volkswagen ID.4 Pro S – $46,000

PHEV Pro: It’s All About EV Range

range-display-from-an-electric-car

One thing that makes PHEVs enjoyable is their long EV-only range. The Volvo XC60 has a range of about 20 miles on electricity alone. But these ranges vary. For example, the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid has an electric-only range of 32 miles. For the Lexus NX 450h+, it’s 37 miles. BMW’s X5 is available as a PHEV, and it has an EV range of 30 miles. For 2022, Volvo is offering an “Extended Range’ version of the XC60 T8, which ups the EV range lớn 32 miles but likely raises the price.

PHEV Caveats for Your Consideration 

I had my reasons. But what matters is whether a PHEV works for you and your lifestyle. If you have a short commute or easy access lớn charging stations at work or a local business, it probably will be a great experience. But first, you must consider two big caveats before choosing a PHEV as I did:

  1. If you have a very long commute or no way lớn quickly and easily charge up, stick with a traditional hybrid.
  2. If you want an all-electric car but take frequent road trips and are concerned about your ability lớn charge up your vehicle on the road, a plug-in hybrid is probably best for you.

Related Electric Car Articles:

  • Types of Electric Vehicles: EV, BEV, HEV, PHEV
  • Should I Charge My Electric Car Every Night?
  • Should You Buy an Electric Vehicle or a Plug-in Hybrid?
  • Electric Car Questions and Answers

See all the Electric Cars, PHEVs, and Hybrids available lớn buy today.


Thông tin thêm

Why I Chose a PHEV Over a Hybrid

#Chose #PHEV #Hybrid
[rule_3_plain] #Chose #PHEV #Hybrid

I’ve driven plenty of electric cars. Most are quite good. Traditional hybrids like the Ford Maverick or Hyundai Elantra Hybrid work best for motorists who want the cheapest, most convenient, and most efficient personal transportation. The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) sits between those two options.
A good PHEV combines the best of both worlds. That’s precisely why I chose a PHEV over a hybrid or pure EV. I will walk you through the reasons why I chose a plug-in hybrid over a regular hybrid so you can decide which vehicle works best for you and your situation.
In this article:

Challenges with Pure Electric Vehicles (EV)
PHEV vs. HEV: Which One’s Best?
My Choice: Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge (PHEV)
My PHEV Daily Driving Regimen
Reasons Why a PHEV Might Not Be Right for You
PHEV Pro: It’s All About EV Range
PHEV Caveats for Your Consideration
Challenges with Pure Electric Vehicles (EV)

If the average American family drove an electric vehicle (EV), specifically an electric SUV, they’d probably like it. The problem for me is that an all-electric SUV in the size I’d prefer, with over 200 miles of range, isn’t super common.
Also, I’m not convinced that the part of the country I live in (the Southeast) offers the speed, convenience, and abundance of charging options that an EV would demand. This situation will change over time, but the lease on my current car expires now.
PHEV vs. HEV: Which One Is Best? 

What lớn Know About a Hybrid Vehicle 
If low cost of operation is your primary goal, a hybrid is probably the best option. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) like the Toyota Prius, Ford Maverick, and Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid are inexpensive and offer excellent fuel economy. The three listed here have an MSRP of less than $25,000. The Hyundai’s 60 mpg is very impressive.
Remember, you do not have lớn charge up traditional hybrids. They use the gasoline engine lớn charge a small battery pack, and the combination of gas and electricity provides that excellent fuel economy.
What lớn Know About a Plug-In Vehicle 
PHEVs also provide excellent fuel economy but depend more on your driving habits. A plug-in hybrid has both an electric motor and a gasoline engine. It works like an electric car for the first several miles and that range depends on the vehicle you get.

Once you use the electric-only battery, it automatically starts functioning as a hybrid. In my case, the daily drive lớn school drop-off, assorted errands, and regular trips lớn the airport all add up lớn a car that functions like an EV most of the time.
My Choice: Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge (PHEV)

The vehicle I chose is a Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge, a plug-in electric vehicle. It’s not the least expensive PHEV, but the XC60 has the exact combination of comfort, features, size, and performance I wanted. By the way, most PHEVs are both efficient and quick.
The electric-only driving range on the 2021 XC60 PHEV is about 20 miles. 2022 models now offer an extended range model (a larger battery) that boosts EV only range lớn more than 30 miles. For instance, I can plug in and charge up for không lấy phí on an occasional trip lớn the office because my employer has installed a không lấy phí bank of Màn chơi 1 and Màn chơi 2 chargers for employees.
One thing that’s worth mentioning is that I don’t use this car for long road trips. I did once, and it worked fine. But that trip’s fuel economy was just under 40 miles per gallon. If you take frequent road trips, a PHEV won’t be money well spent; you can get that kind of fuel economy with a non-plug-in hybrid for less money. PHEVs are more expensive and are most efficient in daily urban or suburban driving.
My PHEV Daily Driving Regimen
Here’s how the PHEV Volvo works out perfectly for my specific driving situation. Three days a week, my daughter attends an in-school learning program. The other two days, she stays home for school. This combined arrangement works well for us in this vehicle. I can get my daughter lớn school, grab a coffee on the way home, mail some packages, and make it home with about a mile of range left.
Then, I plug in at home using the Volvo-provided charging cable. My house does not have an installed charger; it’s just plugged into the 110-volt outlet found in most people’s garages. Since I spend the rest of the day working at home, the car sits many hours and can charge. Sometimes I get the entire 20 miles between school drop-off and pick-up; sometimes, not. It depends on afterschool activities and other errands.

When I arrive home in the afternoon, I plug in the car, and it charges overnight. Because I rarely use the gas engine, I go lớn the gas station about once per month. At one point, I was getting 80 miles per gallon, but that went down lớn 69.5 on a few occasions because I drove lớn the airport, and the airport exceeded the 20-mile electric-only range. But this isn’t for everyone. If I had weekly trips lớn the airport or out of town, a PHEV would make less sense.
Reasons Why a Plug-In Hybrid May Not Be Right for You
Several unique factors apply lớn some but not lớn all. Do any of these reasons for not choosing a PHEV apply lớn you?
Commuting a distance. Long commute distance means you can’t drive mainly in electric mode.
Driving with a lead foot. PHEVs use a gas engine that kicks in during hard acceleration. If you drive with a lead foot, your MPG will not benefit from a PHEV.
Preference. You’d rather drive an all-electric vehicle and can afford one with a long-range.
Plugging in is an issue. Your home (or apartment) doesn’t have a private garage or place lớn charge.
Choice. You want the maximum MPG combined with the lowest-priced car.
PHEV Prices
PHEVs are often more expensive than hybrids or gasoline-only vehicles. The extra money you save by not buying gas isn’t enough lớn make it make sense. You have lớn want an electric car and be willing lớn spend the extra money and then need the added convenience and flexibility of the plug-in. Many plug-in hybrids cost $5,000 lớn $10,000 more than a nicely equipped standard version of the same vehicle.
It works for me because I like the feel of an EV but enjoy the convenience of not relying on long charge times at home or visiting public charging stations. I also like the extra power of a car that combines a gasoline engine and an electric motor.
Don’t forget that a PHEV may come with federal government rebates. Check lớn see if your preferred vehicle is eligible. You can also search trực tuyến for state and local incentives. California, for example, offers many rebates for PHEVs that help defer costs further.
PHEV SUVs Come at a Premium 
For the sake of comparison, here are some all-electric SUVs and their approximate prices. The base price of a new Volvo XC60 T8 Inscription Expression is about $55,000.
Audi e-tron – $88,000
Chevrolet Bolt EUV Premier – $38,000
Hyundai Kona Electric Limited – $44,000
Jaguar I-Pace – $72,000
Volvo XC40 Recharge Twin – $57,000
Volkswagen ID.4 Pro S – $46,000
PHEV Pro: It’s All About EV Range

One thing that makes PHEVs enjoyable is their long EV-only range. The Volvo XC60 has a range of about 20 miles on electricity alone. But these ranges vary. For example, the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid has an electric-only range of 32 miles. For the Lexus NX 450h+, it’s 37 miles. BMW’s X5 is available as a PHEV, and it has an EV range of 30 miles. For 2022, Volvo is offering an “Extended Range’ version of the XC60 T8, which ups the EV range lớn 32 miles but likely raises the price.
PHEV Caveats for Your Consideration 
I had my reasons. But what matters is whether a PHEV works for you and your lifestyle. If you have a short commute or easy access lớn charging stations at work or a local business, it probably will be a great experience. But first, you must consider two big caveats before choosing a PHEV as I did:
If you have a very long commute or no way lớn quickly and easily charge up, stick with a traditional hybrid.
If you want an all-electric car but take frequent road trips and are concerned about your ability lớn charge up your vehicle on the road, a plug-in hybrid is probably best for you.
Related Electric Car Articles:
Types of Electric Vehicles: EV, BEV, HEV, PHEV
Should I Charge My Electric Car Every Night?
Should You Buy an Electric Vehicle or a Plug-in Hybrid?
Electric Car Questions and Answers
See all the Electric Cars, PHEVs, and Hybrids available lớn buy today.

#Chose #PHEV #Hybrid
[rule_2_plain] #Chose #PHEV #Hybrid
[rule_2_plain] #Chose #PHEV #Hybrid
[rule_3_plain]

#Chose #PHEV #Hybrid

I’ve driven plenty of electric cars. Most are quite good. Traditional hybrids like the Ford Maverick or Hyundai Elantra Hybrid work best for motorists who want the cheapest, most convenient, and most efficient personal transportation. The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) sits between those two options.
A good PHEV combines the best of both worlds. That’s precisely why I chose a PHEV over a hybrid or pure EV. I will walk you through the reasons why I chose a plug-in hybrid over a regular hybrid so you can decide which vehicle works best for you and your situation.
In this article:

Challenges with Pure Electric Vehicles (EV)
PHEV vs. HEV: Which One’s Best?
My Choice: Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge (PHEV)
My PHEV Daily Driving Regimen
Reasons Why a PHEV Might Not Be Right for You
PHEV Pro: It’s All About EV Range
PHEV Caveats for Your Consideration
Challenges with Pure Electric Vehicles (EV)

If the average American family drove an electric vehicle (EV), specifically an electric SUV, they’d probably like it. The problem for me is that an all-electric SUV in the size I’d prefer, with over 200 miles of range, isn’t super common.
Also, I’m not convinced that the part of the country I live in (the Southeast) offers the speed, convenience, and abundance of charging options that an EV would demand. This situation will change over time, but the lease on my current car expires now.
PHEV vs. HEV: Which One Is Best? 

What lớn Know About a Hybrid Vehicle 
If low cost of operation is your primary goal, a hybrid is probably the best option. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) like the Toyota Prius, Ford Maverick, and Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid are inexpensive and offer excellent fuel economy. The three listed here have an MSRP of less than $25,000. The Hyundai’s 60 mpg is very impressive.
Remember, you do not have lớn charge up traditional hybrids. They use the gasoline engine lớn charge a small battery pack, and the combination of gas and electricity provides that excellent fuel economy.
What lớn Know About a Plug-In Vehicle 
PHEVs also provide excellent fuel economy but depend more on your driving habits. A plug-in hybrid has both an electric motor and a gasoline engine. It works like an electric car for the first several miles and that range depends on the vehicle you get.

Once you use the electric-only battery, it automatically starts functioning as a hybrid. In my case, the daily drive lớn school drop-off, assorted errands, and regular trips lớn the airport all add up lớn a car that functions like an EV most of the time.
My Choice: Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge (PHEV)

The vehicle I chose is a Volvo XC60 T8 Recharge, a plug-in electric vehicle. It’s not the least expensive PHEV, but the XC60 has the exact combination of comfort, features, size, and performance I wanted. By the way, most PHEVs are both efficient and quick.
The electric-only driving range on the 2021 XC60 PHEV is about 20 miles. 2022 models now offer an extended range model (a larger battery) that boosts EV only range lớn more than 30 miles. For instance, I can plug in and charge up for không lấy phí on an occasional trip lớn the office because my employer has installed a không lấy phí bank of Màn chơi 1 and Màn chơi 2 chargers for employees.
One thing that’s worth mentioning is that I don’t use this car for long road trips. I did once, and it worked fine. But that trip’s fuel economy was just under 40 miles per gallon. If you take frequent road trips, a PHEV won’t be money well spent; you can get that kind of fuel economy with a non-plug-in hybrid for less money. PHEVs are more expensive and are most efficient in daily urban or suburban driving.
My PHEV Daily Driving Regimen
Here’s how the PHEV Volvo works out perfectly for my specific driving situation. Three days a week, my daughter attends an in-school learning program. The other two days, she stays home for school. This combined arrangement works well for us in this vehicle. I can get my daughter lớn school, grab a coffee on the way home, mail some packages, and make it home with about a mile of range left.
Then, I plug in at home using the Volvo-provided charging cable. My house does not have an installed charger; it’s just plugged into the 110-volt outlet found in most people’s garages. Since I spend the rest of the day working at home, the car sits many hours and can charge. Sometimes I get the entire 20 miles between school drop-off and pick-up; sometimes, not. It depends on afterschool activities and other errands.

When I arrive home in the afternoon, I plug in the car, and it charges overnight. Because I rarely use the gas engine, I go lớn the gas station about once per month. At one point, I was getting 80 miles per gallon, but that went down lớn 69.5 on a few occasions because I drove lớn the airport, and the airport exceeded the 20-mile electric-only range. But this isn’t for everyone. If I had weekly trips lớn the airport or out of town, a PHEV would make less sense.
Reasons Why a Plug-In Hybrid May Not Be Right for You
Several unique factors apply lớn some but not lớn all. Do any of these reasons for not choosing a PHEV apply lớn you?
Commuting a distance. Long commute distance means you can’t drive mainly in electric mode.
Driving with a lead foot. PHEVs use a gas engine that kicks in during hard acceleration. If you drive with a lead foot, your MPG will not benefit from a PHEV.
Preference. You’d rather drive an all-electric vehicle and can afford one with a long-range.
Plugging in is an issue. Your home (or apartment) doesn’t have a private garage or place lớn charge.
Choice. You want the maximum MPG combined with the lowest-priced car.
PHEV Prices
PHEVs are often more expensive than hybrids or gasoline-only vehicles. The extra money you save by not buying gas isn’t enough lớn make it make sense. You have lớn want an electric car and be willing lớn spend the extra money and then need the added convenience and flexibility of the plug-in. Many plug-in hybrids cost $5,000 lớn $10,000 more than a nicely equipped standard version of the same vehicle.
It works for me because I like the feel of an EV but enjoy the convenience of not relying on long charge times at home or visiting public charging stations. I also like the extra power of a car that combines a gasoline engine and an electric motor.
Don’t forget that a PHEV may come with federal government rebates. Check lớn see if your preferred vehicle is eligible. You can also search trực tuyến for state and local incentives. California, for example, offers many rebates for PHEVs that help defer costs further.
PHEV SUVs Come at a Premium 
For the sake of comparison, here are some all-electric SUVs and their approximate prices. The base price of a new Volvo XC60 T8 Inscription Expression is about $55,000.
Audi e-tron – $88,000
Chevrolet Bolt EUV Premier – $38,000
Hyundai Kona Electric Limited – $44,000
Jaguar I-Pace – $72,000
Volvo XC40 Recharge Twin – $57,000
Volkswagen ID.4 Pro S – $46,000
PHEV Pro: It’s All About EV Range

One thing that makes PHEVs enjoyable is their long EV-only range. The Volvo XC60 has a range of about 20 miles on electricity alone. But these ranges vary. For example, the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid has an electric-only range of 32 miles. For the Lexus NX 450h+, it’s 37 miles. BMW’s X5 is available as a PHEV, and it has an EV range of 30 miles. For 2022, Volvo is offering an “Extended Range’ version of the XC60 T8, which ups the EV range lớn 32 miles but likely raises the price.
PHEV Caveats for Your Consideration 
I had my reasons. But what matters is whether a PHEV works for you and your lifestyle. If you have a short commute or easy access lớn charging stations at work or a local business, it probably will be a great experience. But first, you must consider two big caveats before choosing a PHEV as I did:
If you have a very long commute or no way lớn quickly and easily charge up, stick with a traditional hybrid.
If you want an all-electric car but take frequent road trips and are concerned about your ability lớn charge up your vehicle on the road, a plug-in hybrid is probably best for you.
Related Electric Car Articles:
Types of Electric Vehicles: EV, BEV, HEV, PHEV
Should I Charge My Electric Car Every Night?
Should You Buy an Electric Vehicle or a Plug-in Hybrid?
Electric Car Questions and Answers
See all the Electric Cars, PHEVs, and Hybrids available lớn buy today.

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